Archive of ‘academic library’ category

Effordability Summit

The University of Wisconsin-Stout (in Menomonie, WI) will be hosting our second “E”ffordability Summit on the March 26-27.  The full schedule, registration and additional information can be found at https://effordabilitysummit2018.jimdo.com/.  This is shaping up to be a really great conference with keynotes by OTNers Michelle Reed, UT-Arlington and Dave Ernst.  In addition to a full slate of content, we will also have Daniel Williamson, Managing Director of OpenStax, Glenda Lembisz from the National Association of College Stores and Mindy Boland, ISKME/OER Commons and much more!

bots, big data and the future

Computational Propaganda: Bots, Targeting And The Future

February 9, 201811:37 AM ET 

https://www.npr.org/sections/13.7/2018/02/09/584514805/computational-propaganda-yeah-that-s-a-thing-now

Combine the superfast calculational capacities of Big Compute with the oceans of specific personal information comprising Big Data — and the fertile ground for computational propaganda emerges. That’s how the small AI programs called bots can be unleashed into cyberspace to target and deliver misinformation exactly to the people who will be most vulnerable to it. These messages can be refined over and over again based on how well they perform (again in terms of clicks, likes and so on). Worst of all, all this can be done semiautonomously, allowing the targeted propaganda (like fake news stories or faked images) to spread like viruses through communities most vulnerable to their misinformation.

According to Bolsover and Howard, viewing computational propaganda only from a technical perspective would be a grave mistake. As they explain, seeing it just in terms of variables and algorithms “plays into the hands of those who create it, the platforms that serve it, and the firms that profit from it.”

Computational propaganda is a new thing. People just invented it. And they did so by realizing possibilities emerging from the intersection of new technologies (Big Compute, Big Data) and new behaviors those technologies allowed (social media). But the emphasis on behavior can’t be lost.

People are not machines. We do things for a whole lot of reasons including emotions of loss, anger, fear and longing. To combat computational propaganda’s potentially dangerous effects on democracy in a digital age, we will need to focus on both its howand its why.

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more on big data in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

more on bots in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bot

more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

Library Counter project

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/06/library-counter-project/
short link: http://bit.ly/libcount

Library counters project from Plamen Miltenoff

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/02/05/key-performance-indicator-toolkit/comment-page-1/#comment-843

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Mark Sandford <msandford@colgate.edu>
Reply-To: lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Monday, February 5, 2018 at 7:32 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Using Raspberry Pi(s) w/ Sensors to Obtain Counts on Occupancy in a Library Space

Berika,

We’re currently experimenting/piloting with RPis, the RPi camera module, and this code:

https://github.com/WatershedArts/Footfall

It’s working, generally, but it does require a good bit of config tweaking to get it to accurately count. It also needs (I’ve discovered) a certain amount of distance between the door and the camera. We have very low ceilings at our doorways and a single person can span the entire frame which appears to confuse the software. All that being said, it’s very much worth looking into.

Analytics out of the box aren’t great. The only built in report is only the current day’s numbers, but it’s pretty easy to export data. We have Libinsight from Springshare and I’m working on pumping that data into their system. It is tricky because the system basically records two things: a timestamp, and a positive or negative integer depending on whether or not the traffic was going in or out. By default, no generic analytics system seems to understand that well enough to display it the way I’d like, so I may have to create some custom reports using d3.js or similar.

I’m using the Pi 2 and standard camera module from Adafruit. I’d be happy to answer questions.

——-

Mark Sandford  Systems Librarian Assistant Professor in the Libraries Colgate University Libraries

On Thu, Feb 1, 2018 at 1:23 PM, <berika.williams@tufts.edu> wrote:

Hi all,

We are trying to automate counting the number of people entering and leaving a

specific floor of our library. (The library is located in a multi-use

building.)

We’ve looked at the awesome “Measure the Future” code but we need analytics

more akin to a gate count versus tracking movement of people utilizing the

space.

Have any of you used raspberry pis or other technologies to do this type of

tracking?

If so, would you be willing to share your hardware/software setup with us and

also what type of data/analytics you’re getting back from the system?

Thank you,

Berika

——————

Berika Williams

Research and Instruction

Emerging Technologies and Web Librarian

Hirsh Health Sciences Library/ Tufts University

145 Harrison Ave, Boston MA 02111

http://hirshlibrary.tufts.edu

  1. 617 636-2454

blockchain for libraries

Blockchain technology has the potential to enhance the role played by libraries within their communities, however, there are many questions yet to be answered about how specifically blockchain technology might be used and how much value it would add to library services and the communities they serve.  Ideas from within the information profession are needed as we formulate recommendations for the profession.

The San José State University School of Information (iSchool) received an IMLS grant to investigate ways that blockchain technology can be used by libraries as a community anchor to partner with other organizations and to support city/community goals.  Some suggestions for blockchain applications in libraries include building an enhanced metadata center, protecting Digital First Sale rights, supporting community-based collections, facilitating partnerships across organizations, and more.

The year-long project will provide three opportunities for a national dialog among technical experts in libraries, blockchain technology, and urban planning and members of the information professions to discuss ways that blockchain technology can advance library services to support city/community goals.

  1. The project website and blog includes information and resources about blockchain technology, potential uses of blockchain technology by libraries, and project updates along with a blog to foster open dialog. Seehttps://ischoolblogs.sjsu.edu/blockchains/
  2. The National Forum scheduled for August 6, 2018 in San Jose, CA will be comprised of 20-30 technical experts in libraries, blockchain technology, and urban planning to identify and discuss key opportunities for libraries to serve as community anchors using blockchain technology.
  3. The Library 2.018 conference, Blockchain Applied: Impact on the Information Profession, is designed for presentations and discussion on the uses of blockchain technology in libraries. Registration in this open online conference is free to the profession and public. Scheduled on June 7, 2018 from 12:00 – 3:00 pm PDT. The call for proposals is located on the conference website.

We are seeking nominations of individuals to represent the professional associations (e.g. LITA, PLA, ULC, CLIR, ARL) and information organizations by participating in the National Forum in San Jose, CA (August 6, 2018).  Funding provided by IMLS is available to support most of the expenses (travel, lodging, meals) for the National Forum for invited participants.

Nominations (including self-nominations) are due by February 15, 2018.  Nominees should be knowledgeable about blockchain technology and libraries in order to have an impact on the recommendations that will be made and discussed during the Library 2.018 conference and National Forum.

Nominations to participate in the Blockchain National Forum should be submitted by February 15 using this Google Form.

more for blockchain in education in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

library of congress twitter

Library Of Congress Will No Longer Archive Every Tweet

learning spaces and stem students

The Next 10 Years: Helping STEM Students Thrive series, on January 10th, from 12-1:30 PM ET. The topic will be learning spaces with the following guest speakers:

  • Jeanne L. Narum, Principal, Learning Spaces Collaboratory

Jeanne will discuss what she has learned about what works, why and how it works in achieving sustainable institutional transformation in the world of planning spaces for learning in the undergraduate setting.

  • Lisa Stephens, Sr. Strategist- SUNY Academic Innovation – University at Buffalo
  • Rebecca Rotundo, Instructional Technology Specialist, University at Buffalo

Lisa and Rebecca will share their experience in FLEXspace (Flexible Learning Environments eXchange) an open education repository project which has expanded to over 2,600+ users from 1,200+ educational institutions across 42 countries.

  • Xin Li, Associate University Librarian, Cornell

Xin will share information about the Library’s initiative to install a Portal on the Cornell campus in Sept. 2018, with the goal to engage faculty, students, and the community in live conversations with Portal users in different countries, cultures, or life circumstances, such as what others do for STEM education.

For more information on the speakers and to register and log into the event please go tohttps://gateway.shindig.com/event/learningspaces

This collaboration between Cornell University and the University at Buffalo featuring the perspectives of national thought leaders and institutional representatives about expanding the participation of women in undergraduate STEM education at different scales.

This interactive, online series features a different topic per month. Each session kicks off with an introduction by our distinguished thought leaders followed by institutional representatives from Cornell University and the University at Buffalo who will share insights from their campuses. Participants may join the conversation, ask questions, share experiences, build networks and learn more about:

·         Innovations that can expand female or underrepresented minority student participation and success in STEM undergraduate education.

·         Effective evidence-based STEM teaching practices commonly adopted at research universities.

·         Unique institutional and cultural challenges to achieving STEM diversity.

·         What difference at scale looks like.

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more on learning spaces in academic environment in this iMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+spaces

Social Democrats in Disarray

What’s Left?: Social Democrats in Disarray

Alan Johnson Summer 2015

Why has the right, including the populist right, rather than the left, been the main political beneficiary of the anger and bitterness that has roiled Europe since the 2008 financial crash, the eurozone crisis, and the resulting deep recession and brutal austerity? After all, these events surely proved the relevance of the left’s critique of capitalism.

The left is increasingly marginal to political life in Europe despite the fact that, in the words of Owen Jones, an important voice of the British left, “Living standards are falling, public assets are being flogged to private interests, a tiny minority are being enriched at the expense of society and the hard-won gains of working people—social security, rights in the workplace and so on—are being stripped away.” And the radical parties and movements to the left of the social democratic parties have been faring no better. In the brutally honest assessment of the British Marxist Alex Callinicos, “Nearly seven years after the financial crash began, the radical left has not been weaker for decades.”

But the European left’s inability to forcefully meet the crisis is not due to a failure of individual political leaders, but the fact that it has not developed, in theory or practice, a response to the three great waves of change—economic, socio-cultural, and politico-intellectual—that have crashed over it since the late 1970s.

The fruits of this radical transformation of European social democracy into a political force pursuing a slightly kinder and a slightly gentler neoliberalism—which some dub “social neoliberalism”—have been bitter.

While capital is global, mobile, and regnant, organized labor is increasingly deindustrialized, indebted, and precarious; often temporary, part-time, insecure, and, quite frankly, unorganized.

an explosion of inequality, relative poverty, and acquisitive individualism.

The manic, pathological quality of neoliberal consumerism has produced an explosion of personal debt.

the crisis of the European left is also intellectual.

 

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