Archive of ‘e-learning’ category

net neutrality and education

3 Ways a Net Neutrality Repeal Might Impact Universities

The impending change in internet regulations could be detrimental to the quality of education students receive.
Meghan Bogardus Cortez , Jan 11, 2018
https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2018/01/3-ways-net-neutrality-repeal-might-impact-universities

1. Technology that Increases Access Hits the Slow Lane

Innovations in videoconferencing and lecture capture technologies have allowed universities to provide flexible learning experiences to students no matter their location. However, if internet service providers are allowed to create “fast lanes” and “slow lanes” of access, experts worry these learning experiences will be in jeopardy.
“slow lanes” of internet access could make it difficult for students to access cloud software or applications without hitting data caps.

2. Inhibit Ability to Research and Access Materials

a 40-page commentary to the FCC explaining how a repeal would hurt universities, eCampus News reports.

“Institutions of higher education and libraries depend upon an open internet to carry out their educational and civic missions, and to serve their communities,” reads the commentary.

“almost everything” relies on the internet in higher education. Students use it for research, to take courses and turn in assignments while faculty use it for research and to create lesson plans. Roberts says his library needs it to archive and preserve materials. Slower internet could inhibit research and access to library resources.

3. Increased Costs Without Increased Educational Experiences

high cost of attending a university might see a bump without net neutrality.
slower internet access would actually degrade the quality of education offered for a higher cost.

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more on net neutrality and education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=net+neutrality

Online Students Need More Interaction

Online Students Need More Interaction with Peers and Teachers [#Infographic]

New research shows online learners are seeking more interaction, mobile device support and career services.

university administrators want to make sure their courses are up to standards and their students are supported.

new report from the Learning House and Aslanian Market Research measures the opinions of 1,500 online students regarding everything from course satisfaction to study methods

institutions need to more clearly share the positive outcomes that come with completing degree and certificate programs online.”

online courses would be better if there was more contact and engagement.

online students

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more on online students in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+students

Millennials Gen Z prefer live training

Millennials and Gen Z still prefer live training, study finds

 Feb. 13, 2018

https://www.hrdive.com/news/millennials-and-gen-z-still-prefer-live-training-study-finds/516792/

instructor led training

Although by a narrower margin for millennials and Gen Z, the numbers in the Wainhouse study shows that the personal touch hasn’t been replaced in workplace learning.

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more on instructional design in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

STAR Symposium 2018

https://softchalkcloud.com/lesson/serve/tAyfSOjZTkVW05/html

Keynote: Dr. Todd Zakrajsek, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

“Teaching for Brain-based Learning”

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Effective Online Engagement
Camille Brandt, Bemidji State University

student is a boxed term. but there are flavors; undergrad vs grad, what takeaways they are looking for, categories of students

ask for expectations, outcomes, and keep touching bases during class.

Vocaroo.com

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Grading Participation in an Online Course

Kerry Marrer, St. Cloud State University

Kate Mooney, St. Cloud State University

Kris Portz, St. Cloud State University

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What’s a FIG? Inquiring Minds Want to Know!

Miki Huntington, Minneapolis Community and Technical College

COP Community of Practice. Stipends – may be or not. May be only a book.

topics: online learning, academic technologies etc

offering support: to one another in a collaborative environment. Commenting to each other notes.

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ijco6s9bNBuD5_fYmrRTgKzubCXFM6GX

brain research distance ed

The Implications of Brain Research for Distance Education

Katrina A. Meyer
Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership
University of North Dakota
katrina_meyer@und.nodak.edu

posted on FB in 2013 https://www.facebook.com/plamen.miltenoff/posts/10100455869591041

The brain is actually three brains: the ancient reptilian brain, the limbic brain, and the cortical brain. This article will focus on the limbic brain, because it may be most important to successfully using interactive video or web-based video. The limbic brain monitors the external world and the internal body, taking in information through the senses as well as body temperature and blood pressure, among others. It is the limbic brain that generates and interprets facial expressions and handles emotions, while the cortical brain handles symbolic activities such as language as well as action and strategizing. The two interact when an emotion is sent from the limbic to the cortical brain and generates a conscious thought; in response to a feeling of fear (limbic), you ask, “what should I do?” (cortical).

The importance of direct eye contact and deciphering body language is also important for sending and picking up clues about social context.

The loss of social cues is important because it may affect the quality of the content of the presentation (by not allowing timely feedback or questions) but also because students may feel less engaged and become frustrated with the interaction, and subsequently lower their assessment of the class and the instructor (Reeves & Nass, 1996). Fortunately, faculty can provide such social cues verbally, once they are aware of the importance of helping students use these new media.

Attachment theory also supports the importance of physical and emotional connections.

As many a struggling teacher knows, students are often impervious to learning new concepts. They may replay the new information for a test, but after time passes, they revert to the earlier (and likely wrong) information. This is referred to as the “power of mental models.” As explained in Marchese (2000), when we view a tree, it is not as if we see the tree in our head, as in photography.

The coping strategies of the two hemispheres are fundamentally different. The left hemisphere’s job is to create a belief system or model and to fold new experiences into that belief system. If confronted with some new information that doesn’t fit the model, it relies on Freudian defense mechanisms to deny, repress or confabulate – anything to preserve the status quo. The right hemisphere’s strategy is to play “Devil’s Advocate,” to question the status quo and look for global inconsistencies. When the anomalous information reaches a certain threshold, the right hemisphere decides that it is time to force a complete revision of the entire model and start from scratch (Ramachandran & Blakeslee, 1998, p. 136).

While much hemispheric-based research has been repudiated as an oversimplification (Gackenbach, 1999), the above description of how new information eventually overwhelms an old world view may be the result of multiple brain functions – some of which work to preserve our models and others to alter – that help us both maintain and change as needed.

Self-talk is the “the root of empathy, understanding, cooperation, and rules that allow us to be successful social beings. Any sense of moral behavior requires thought before action” (Ratey, 2001, p. 255).

Healy (1999) argues that based on what we know about brain development in children, new computer media may be responsible for developing brains that are largely different from the brains of adults. This is because “many brain connections have become specialized for . . . media” (p. 133); in this view, a brain formed by language and reading is different from a brain formed by hypermedia. Different media lead to different synaptic connections being laid down and reinforced, creating different brains in youngsters raised on fast-paced, visually-stimulating computer applications and video games. “Newer technologies emphasize rapid processing of visual symbols . . . and deemphasize traditional verbal learning . . . and the linear, analytic thought process . . . [making it] more difficult to deal with abstract verbal reasoning” (Healy, 1999, p. 142).

 

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more on distance ed in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=distance+education

proctoring ideas

Digital Proctoring

I great exchange on ideas regarding digital proctoring in the Blended and Online Learning listserv:

STUDENTS

David Huckleberry

Coordinator of Digital Instruction – Physics & Astronomy

Purdue University

Office = PHYS 176

525 Northwestern Avenue

West Lafayette, IN 47907

dhuckleb@purdue.edu

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Proctorio

Scott Robison, Ph.D.
Associate Director, Digital Learning and Design
Portland State University

Portland, OR 97201
503-725-9118
@otterscotter
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At University of Wisconsin – Superior – we have stopped offering proctoring for students.  Faculty, however, have come up with a way for online testing. They ask student to use Kaltura tto record their face and part of the test and then post the video in the dropbox.

Rebecca Graetz, EdD

Instructional Program Manager II

UW – Superior

rgraetz@uwsuper.edu

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ProctorU, an online proctoring service, with online courses that offered online exams and BioSig ID for courses that did not require exams.

Kelvin Bentley
Email: timelord33@gmail.com
Twitter: blacktimelord
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more on proctoring in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proctoring

digital badging

Learning, Engaging, Enhancing with Digital Badging

Friday, September 29, 2017https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2017/9/learning-engaging-enhancing-with-digital-badging

The Integrated Advising and Planning for Student Success or ‘iPASS’ grant has been funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; it supports the transformation of advising and student services in higher ed through the redesign of structures, processes, and technologies. To date, this work is ongoing in 26 grantee institutions across the country.

created and delivered our Series on Excellence in Advising through iPASS as a semi self-paced online course to ensure the broadest access possible to all grantees.

 

snapchat leading social media app

Snapchat is still the network of choice for U.S. teens — and Instagram is Facebook’s best shot at catching up

Good news, Snap investors. By

https://www.recode.net/2017/12/16/16783570/snapchat-instagram-teenagers-rbc-survey-favorite-app

  • Some 79 percent of U.S. 13- to 18-year-olds surveyed said they have a Snapchat account, more than any other type of social media. Of that age group, 73 percent have an Instagram account and just 57 percent say they are on Facebook.
  • Respondents had to choose only one social network they could keep if they were “trapped on a deserted island.” This time, 44 percent of teens picked Snapchat, ahead of Instagram (24 percent) and Facebook (14 percent). One year ago, for RBC’s same survey question, the percentage of teens who insisted on keeping Snapchat on a desert island led with 28 percent — suggesting the app is still growing in necessity/popularity among young people.

Snapchat features
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more on Snapchat for education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=snapchat

students and etext

Student Engagement with E-Texts: What the Data Tell Us

by Serdar Abaci, Joshua Quick and Anastasia Morrone Monday, October 9, 2017

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/10/student-engagement-with-etexts-what-the-data-tell-us

  • This case study of Indiana University’s e-text initiative reports on students’ actual use of and engagement with digital textbooks.
  • In a typical semester, students read more in the first four weeks and less in later weeks except during major assessment times; in a typical week, most reading occurs between 5:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. from Monday to Thursday, indicating that students use e-texts mainly as a self-study resource.
  • Highlighting was the markup feature most used by students, whereas use of the other interactive markup features (shared notes, questions, and answers) was minimal, perhaps because of students’ lack of awareness of these features.
  • Research found that higher engagement with e-texts (reading and highlighting) correlated with higher course grades.

Although cost savings is often cited as a key advantage of electronic textbooks (aka, e-textbooks or simply e-texts), e-texts also provide powerful markup and interaction tools. For these tools to improve student learning, however, their adoption is critically important.
Indiana U etext initiative

The Indiana University e-texts program, which began in 2009, has four primary goals:

  1. Drive down the cost of materials for students
  2. Provide high-quality materials of choice
  3. Enable new tools for teaching and learning
  4. Shape the terms of sustainable models that work for students, faculty, and authors

To date, student savings on textbooks amount to $21,673,338. However, we recognize that many students do not pay the full list price for paper textbooks when they purchase online, buy used copies, or recoup some of their costs when they resell their texts after the semester is over.
herefore, we divide the calculated savings by two and report that total as a more accurate representation of student savings. Consequently, we claim that students have saved about $11 million since IU’s e-texts program started in spring 2012.

In addition to printing through the e-text platform, students can purchase a print-on-demand (PoD) copy of an e-text for an additional fee.

One downside of e-texts is that students lease their textbook for a limited time instead of owning it. This lease generally lasts a semester or six months, and students lose their access afterwards. However, with IU’s e-text model, students get access to the textbook before the first day of class and maintain their access until they graduate from Indiana University. That is, students can go back to the e-texts after their course to review or reference the content in the book. This could be especially important if the e-text course is a prerequisite for another course.

 

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more on etext and ebooks in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ebook

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