Archive of ‘media literacy’ category

media literacy part of digital citizenship

Making Media Literacy Central to Digital Citizenship

that kind of tech — expensive, bleeding-edge tools — makes headlines but doesn’t make it into many classrooms, especially the most needy ones. What does, however, is video.

68 percent of teachers are using video in their classrooms, and 74 percent of middle schoolers are watching videos for learning.

Video is a key aspect of our always-online attention economy that’s impacting votingbehavior, and fueling hate speech and trolling. Put simply: Video is a contested civic space.

We need to move from a conflation of digital citizenship with internet safety and protectionism to a view of digital citizenship that’s pro-active and prioritizes media literacy and savvy.

equip students with some essential questions they can use to unpack the intentions of anything they encounter. One way to facilitate this thinking is by using a tool like EdPuzzle

We need new ways of thinking that are web-specific. Mike Caulfield’s e-book is a great deep dive into this topic, but as an introduction to web literacy you might first dig into the notion of reading “around” as well as “down” media — that is, encouraging students to not just analyze the specific video or site they’re looking at but related content (e.g., where else an image appears using a reverse Google image search).

Active viewing — engaging more thoughtfully and deeply with what you watch — is a tried-and-true teaching strategy for making sure you don’t just watch media but retain information.

For this content, students shouldn’t just be working toward comprehension but critique; they need to not just understand what they watch, but also have something to say about it. One of my favorite techniques for facilitating this more dialogic and critical mode of video viewing is by using aclassroom backchannel, like TodaysMeet, during video viewings

only 3 percent of the time tweens and teens spend using social media is focused on creation

There are a ton of options out there for facilitating video creation and remix, but two of my favorites are MediaBreaker and Vidcode.

The Anti-Defamation League and Teaching Tolerance have lesson plans that connect to both past and present struggles, and one can also look to the co-created syllabi that have sprung up around Black Lives MatterCharlottesville, and beyond. Pair these resources with video creation tools,

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

more on digital citizenship in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

infographics library

Qualey, E. e. (2014). What Can Infographics Do for You?. AALL Spectrum18(4), 7-8.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d97765379%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Infographics for Advocacy

Infographics for Marketing

Infographics for Data

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more on inforgraphics in this IMS blog
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POD 2017

 

 

2016 POD Network Conference

http://podnetwork.org/content/uploads/2016-POD-Program-Final.pdf

https://guidebook.com/g/pod2016

Studying Connections between Student Well-Being,
Performance, and Active Learning
Amy Godert, Cornell University; Teresa Pettit, Cornell University

Treasure in the Sierra Madre? Digital Badges and Educational
Development
Chris Clark, University of Notre Dame; G. Alex Ambrose, University
of Notre Dame; Gwynn Mettetal, Indiana University South Bend;
David Pedersen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Roberta
(Robin) Sullivan, University of Buffalo, State University of New York

Learning and Teaching Centers: The Missing Link in Data
Analytics
Denise Drane, Northwestern University; Susanna Calkins,
Northwestern University

Identifying and Supporting the Needs of International Faculty
Deborah DeZure, Michigan State University; Cindi Leverich, Michigan
State University

Online Discussions for Engaged and Meaningful Student
Learning
Danilo M. Baylen, University of West Georgia; Cheryl Fulghum,
Haywood Community College

Why Consider Online Asynchronous Educational Development?
Christopher Price, SUNY Center for Professional Development

Online, On-Demand Faculty Professional Development for Your
Campus
Roberta (Robin) Sullivan, University at Buffalo, State University of
New York; Cherie van Putten, Binghamton University, State
University of New York; Chris Price, State University of New York
The Tools of Engagement Project (http://suny.edu/toep) is an online faculty development model that encourages instructors to explore and reflect on innovative and creative uses of freely-available online educational technologies to increase student engagement and learning. TOEP is not traditional professional development but instead provides access to resources for instructors to explore at their own pace through a set of hands-on discovery activities. TOEP facilitates a learning community where participants learn from each
other and share ideas. This poster will demonstrate how you can implement TOEP at your campus by either adopting your own version or joining the existing project.

Video Captioning 101: Establishing High Standards With
Limited Resources
Stacy Grooters, Boston College; Christina Mirshekari, Boston
College; Kimberly Humphrey, Boston College
Recent legal challenges have alerted institutions to the importance of ensuring that video content for instruction is properly captioned. However, merely meeting minimum legal standards can still fall significantly short of the best practices defined by disability rights
organizations and the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Drawing from data gathered through a year-long pilot to investigate the costs and labor required to establish “in-house” captioning support at Boston College, this hands-on session seeks to give
participants the tools and information they need to set a high bar for captioning initiatives at their own institutions.

Sessions on mindfulness

52 Cognitive Neuroscience Applications for Teaching and Learning (BoF)

53 Contemplative Practices (BoF) Facilitators: Penelope Wong, Berea College; Carl S. Moore, University of the District of Columbia

79 The Art of Mindfulness: Transforming Faculty Development by Being Present Ursula Sorensen, Utah Valley University

93 Impacting Learning through Understanding of Work Life Balance Deanna Arbuckle, Walden University

113 Classroom Mindfulness Practices to Increase Attention, Creativity, and Deep Engagement Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

132 Measuring the Impacts of Mindfulness Practices in the Classroom Kelsey Bitting, Northeastern University; Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

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more on POD conferences in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=pod+conference

NMC digital literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

The New Media Consortium (NMC) has released Digital Literacy in Higher Education, Part II: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief, a follow-up to its 2016 strategic brief on digital literacy.

PDF available here.
2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II-ycykt3

But what does it really mean to be digitally literate, and which standards do we use?” said Dr. Eden Dahlstrom, NMC Executive Director. “This report sheds light on the meaning and impact of digital literacy using cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary approaches, highlighting frameworks and exemplars in practice.

NMC’s report has identified a need for institutions and thought leaders to consider the ways in which content creation is unequally expressed throughout the world. In an examination of digital literacy within European, Middle Eastern, and African nations (EMEA), research has surfaced unequal access to information technology based on inequalities of economics, gender, race, and political divides.

2020 2015
1. Complex Problem Solving 1. Complex Problem Solving
2. Critical Thinking 2. Coordinating with Others
3. Creativity 3. People  Management
4. People  Management 4. Critical Thinking
5. Coordinating with Others 5. Negotiation
6. Emotional  Intelligence 6. Quality Control
7. Judgment and Decision Making 7. Service  Orientation
8. Service  Orientation 8. Judgment and Decision Making
9. Negotiation 9. Active Listening
10. Cognitive  Flexibility 10. Creativity

Digital tools themselves are merely enablers, pushing the envelope of  what learners can create. No longer is it acceptable for students to be passive consumers of content; they can contribute to the local and global knowledge ecosystem, learning through the act of producing and discussing rich media, applications, and objects. In the words of many institutional mission statements, students do not have to wait until they graduate to change the world.

Using readily available  digital  content  creation tools (e.g., video production and editing, web and graphic tools), students are evolving into digital storytellers,

digital literacy now encompasses the important skills of being able to coordinate with others to create something truly original that neither mind would fathom independently.

The ability to discern credible from inaccurate resources is foundational to digital literacy. my note: #Fakenews

A lack of broad consensus on the meaning of digital literacy still hinders its uptake, although a growing  body  of research is helping higher education professionals better navigate the continuous adjustments to the field brought about by emerging pedagogies and technologies.

Information literacy is a nearly universal component within these digital literacy frameworks. Critically finding, assessing, and using digital content within the vast and sometimes chaotic internet appears as a vital skill in almost every account, including those published beyond libraries. In contrast, media literacy is less widely included in digital literacy publications,  possibly  due  to  a  focus  on  scholarly, rather than popular, materials. Digital literacies ultimately combine information and media literacy.

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to  focus  on  educational  policy details and personal empowerment,  the  latter  encouraging  learners  to  become  more  effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself… this recommendation for Balkan digital strategy: “Media and information education (with an emphasis on critical thinking and switching from consumption to action) should start at early ages, but address all ages.”

African digital literacy is more business-oriented. Frameworks often speak to job skills and digital entrepreneurship. New skills and professions are emphasized, symbolized by the call for “new collar” positions.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can  also  represent  a  drive  to  produce  more  locally-sourced  content,  as  opposed  to  consuming

Digital literacy is a complex phenomenon in 2017, when considered internationally. Nations  and regions are creating ways to help their populations grapple with the digital revolution that are shaped by their local situations. In doing so, they cut across the genealogy of digital literacies, touching on its historical components: information literacy, digital skills, and media literacy.

2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II-ycykt3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Does Digital Literacy Change Pedagogy?

Students are not all digital natives, and do not necessarily have the same level of capabilities. Some need to be taught to use online tools (such as how to navigate a LMS) for learning. However, once digital literacy skills for staff and students are explicitly recognized as important for learning and teaching, critical drivers for pedagogical change are in place.

Pedagogy that uses an inquiry based/problem solving approach is a great framework to enhance the use and practice of digital skills/capabilities in the classroom.

The current gap between students’ information literacy skills and their need  to  internalize  digital literacy competencies creates an opportunity for academic librarians to support students  in  the pursuit of civic online reasoning at the core of NMC’s multimodal model of three digital literacies. Academic librarians need a new strategy that evolves information literacy to an expanded role educating digitally literate students. Let’s build a new model in which academic librarians are  entrepreneurial collaborators with faculty,55  supporting  their  classroom  efforts  to  help  students become responsible sharers and commentators of news on social media.

“Digital literacy is not just about ensuring that students can use the latest technologies, but also developing skills to select the right tools for a particular context to deepen their learning outcomes and engage in creative problem-solving”

There is a disconnect between how students experience and interact with technology in their personal lives and how they use technology in their roles as  students.  Yes, students are digitally savvy, and yes,  universities  have  a  role  in  questioning  (insightfully  of  course) their sometimes brash digital savviness. We have a situation where students are expecting more, but (as I see it) cannot provide a clear demand, while faculty are unable to walk in  the  shoes  of  the students.

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

podcast at 2x

Speeding Up Your Podcasts Won’t Solve Your Problems

https://plus.google.com/+DanievanderMerwe/posts/CSFxq67eSC4

https://theringer.com/inefficiency-week-podcasts-speed-comprehension-f0ea43949e42

My note: sometimes around 2011, the Chronicle had a report on Berkeley students listening to coursecasts at 2X (can’t find the reference). Here some other sources about #speedlistening:

Stop listening to podcasts at 1.5x

185 comments
https://www.theverge.com/2015/2/17/8043077/stop-listening-to-podcasts-fast-speed
and the opposite opinion:

Lots of Us Listen to Podcasts Faster Than “Normal.” Join Us!

Aisha Harris Oct. 6 2016 1:58 PM http://www.slate.com/blogs/normal/2016/10/06/speed_listening_to_podcasts_is_totally_normal_and_practical.html

Watching lectures at increased speed? Discussion in ‘Medical Students – MD‘ started by kimbosliced, Dec 24, 2010.

https://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/watching-lectures-at-increased-speed.783750/

The Rise of ‘Speed-Listening’
Books can be places for intellectual wandering. They can also be mined of precious information with ruthless efficiency.

Megan Garber

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/06/the-rise-of-speed-listening/396740/

the introduction of Overcast, a podcast-playback app designed by the creator of the text-bookmaking app Instapaper. One of Overcast’s key selling points is a feature called Smart Speed. Smart Speed isn’t about simply playing audio content at 150 or 200 percent of the standard rate; it instead tries to remove, algorithmically, the extraneous things that can bulk up the play time of audio content: dead air, pauses between sentences, intros and outros, that kind of thing.
Here is also the general tendency of podcast use until 2015 from previous IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/02/18/digital-literacy-instruction-for-scsu-health-class/

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more on podcast in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=podcast+education

fake news and video

Computer Scientists Demonstrate The Potential For Faking Video

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/07/14/537154304/computer-scientists-demonstrate-the-potential-for-faking-video

As a team out of the University of Washington explains in a new paper titled “Synthesizing Obama: Learning Lip Sync from Audio,” they’ve made several fake videos of Obama.

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Fake news: you ain’t seen nothing yet

Generating convincing audio and video of fake events, July 1, 2017

https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21724370-generating-convincing-audio-and-video-fake-events-fake-news-you-aint-seen

took only a few days to create the clip on a desktop computer using a generative adversarial network (GAN), a type of machine-learning algorithm.

Faith in written information is under attack in some quarters by the spread of what is loosely known as “fake news”. But images and sound recordings retain for many an inherent trustworthiness. GANs are part of a technological wave that threatens this credibility.

Amnesty International is already grappling with some of these issues. Its Citizen Evidence Lab verifies videos and images of alleged human-rights abuses. It uses Google Earth to examine background landscapes and to test whether a video or image was captured when and where it claims. It uses Wolfram Alpha, a search engine, to cross-reference historical weather conditions against those claimed in the video. Amnesty’s work mostly catches old videos that are being labelled as a new atrocity, but it will have to watch out for generated video, too. Cryptography could also help to verify that content has come from a trusted organisation. Media could be signed with a unique key that only the signing organisation—or the originating device—possesses.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

workforce skills

These are the top 10 workforce skills students will need by 2020

By Laura Ascione, Managing Editor, Content Services, @eSN_Laura
June 20th, 2017
a recent McGraw-Hill Education survey, just 40 percent of college seniors said they felt their college experience was helpful in preparing for a career. Alarmingly, that percentage plummeted to 19 percent for women answering the same question.
data from the nonprofit Institute for the Future, there are 6 drivers of change in today’s workforce:
1. Extreme longevity: People are living longer–by 2025 the number of Americans older than 60 will increase by 70 percent
2. The rise of smart machines and systems: Technology can augment and extend our own capabilities, and workplace automation is killing repetitive jobs
3. Computational world: Increases in sensors and processing makes the world a programmable system; data will give us the ability to see things on a scale that has never been possible
4. New media ecology: New communication tools require media literacies beyond text; visual communication media is becoming a new vernacular
5. Superstructured organizations: Social technologies drive new forms of production and value creation, and social tools are allowing organizations to work at extreme scales
6. Globally connected world: Diversity and adaptability are at the center of operations–the U.S. and Europe no longer hold a monopoly on job creation, innovation, and political power

The top 10 workforce skills of 2020 include:

1. Sense making: The ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems

2. Social intelligence: The ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

3. Novel and adaptive thinking: Proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based. The Drivers: Rise of smart machines and systems, globally connected world

4. Cross cultural competency: The ability to operate in different cultural settings. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

5. Computational thinking: The ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data based reasoning. The Drivers: New media ecology, computational world

6. New media literacy: The ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, new media ecology, Superstructured organizations

7. Transdisciplinary: Literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines. The Drivers: Extreme longevity, computational world

8. Design mindset: The ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world

9. Cognitive load management: The ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functions. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, computational world, new media ecology

10. Virtual collaboration: The ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team. The Drivers: Superstructured organizations, globally connected world

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more on skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=skills

media education differentiated instruction

Friezem, Y. (2017). THE MEDIA PRODUCTION HIVE: USING MEDIA EDUCATION FOR DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION.  Media Education, 8(1), 123-140

https://www.academia.edu/33079666/The_media_production_hive_Using_media_education_for_differentiated_instruction?auto=download

keywords: Media production, media literacy, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), executive
functioning, Media Production Hive

the theoretical framework of Universal Design for Learning (Rose & Meyer, 2002), teaching the same material via various strategies that cumulatively address needs and learning types of each student in the classroom (p. 126). acknowledge all the various types of learners in his class, such as visual learners, auditory learners, write-read learners, and kinesthetic learners, following Gardner’s (1983) multiple intelligence theory.
various ways of receiving, processing, and expressing information by different learners
various ways students can chose to engage in the process of learning
(p. 127) multiple means of representation guarantees each learner processes information in the best way they can, but it also provides repetition of the topic in various ways to deepen understanding
Students need to organize recently acquired knowledge in a strategic way and communicate their understanding to the teacher. Rose and Meyer (2002) created a detailed pathway for teachers to apply UDL using assistive technology.

Media education practices involve demystifying media messages and learning to use
media wisely through activities of evaluation, composition, introspection, and civic engagement. the links between the instructional design of lessons for all students and
the critical analysis, expression, and reflection on media messages are gradually
explored (Dalton, 2017).
Dalton, E. M. (2017). Universal design for learning: Guiding principles to reduce
barriers to digital & media literacy competence. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 9(2).

p. 128 Media production is the process of composing a message via a single or various media platforms. Media production includes creating videos, podcasts, presentations, posters, drawings, and books. With the increasing use of digital devices and applications, students are engaged in various ways to convey their messages using multiple ways of expression and multiple types of representations.

digitalempathy.net/hive

digital empathy media production hive

digital and media literacy competencies (Hobbs, 2010)

p. 137 challenges

Group dynamics often reveal power struggles among team members (Friesem, 2014). The responsibility of the media educator, who is not a mediator by training, is to find the way to mitigate the tension caused by differences among group members (Friesem, 2010). In addition, students have the tendency to use media production as a transgressive practice (Moore, 2011; Grace & Tubin, 1998). Facilitating the process of production involves constant reflection on the classroom power relationship using critical and pragmatic lenses.
Grace, D., & Tobin, J. (1998). Butt jokes and mean-teacher parodies: Video production
in the elementary classroom. In D. Buckingham (Ed.), Teaching popular culture: Beyond radical pedagogy (pp. 42-62). London, UK: University College London Press.

The discourse about the implementations of UDL with digital technology has been broad and used for several research studies (Rose & Meyer, 2002).
Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal
design for learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD).

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
more on instructional desing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional+design

social media in classroom

Social Media in the Classroom: Teaching the tools at your students’ fingertips today will prepare them for what’s to come in the future.

By

Visual Literacy. Using Instagram to select a single photo to capture an overall concept would transfer to so many subject areas.

People, in general, love Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and other networks, because they want to share their pictures, videos and thoughts with the world; this sort of sharing makes people feel important. When kids feel important about what they share, they, in turn, believe that what they learn is important. This is truly what 21st-century learning is about.

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more on social media in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

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