Archive of ‘media literacy’ category

bots and disinformation

Computer-generated humans and disinformation campaigns could soon take over political debate. Last year, researchers found that 70 countries had political disinformation campaigns over two years from r/Futurology

Bots will dominate political debate, experts warn

 

 

Last year, researchers at Oxford University found that 70 countries had political disinformation campaigns over two years.
Perhaps the most notable of such campaigns was that initiated by a Russian propaganda group to influence the 2016 US election result.

he US Federal Communications Commission hosted a period in 2017 where the public could comment on its plans to repeal net neutrality. Harvard Kennedy School lecturer Bruce Schneier notes that while the agency received 22 million comments, many of them were made by fake identities.
Schneier argues that the escalating prevalence of computer-generated personas could “starve” people of democracy

 

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more on deepfake in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=deepfake

algorithm literacy

Report: Colleges Must Teach ‘Algorithm Literacy’ to Help Students Navigate Internet

By Rebecca Koenig     Jan 16, 2020

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-01-16-report-colleges-must-teach-algorithm-literacy-to-help-students-navigate-internet

Project Information Literacy, a nonprofit research institution that explores how college students find, evaluate and use information. It was commissioned by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and The Harvard Graduate School of Education.

focus groups and interviews with 103 undergraduates and 37 faculty members from eight U.S. colleges.

To better equip students for the modern information environment, the report recommends that faculty teach algorithm literacy in their classrooms. And given students’ reliance on learning from their peers when it comes to technology, the authors also suggest that students help co-design these learning experiences.

Algorithms and Media Literacy

While informed and critically aware media users may see past the resulting content found in suggestions provided after conducting a search on YouTube, Facebook, or Google, those without these skills, particularly young or inexperienced users, fail to realize the culpability of underlying algorithms in the resultant filter bubbles and echo chambers (Cohen, 2018).
Media literacy education is more important than ever. It’s not just the overwhelming calls to understand the effects of fake news or addressing data breaches threatening personal information, it is the artificial intelligence systems being designed to predict and project what is perceived to be what consumers of social media want.
it’s time to revisit the Eight Key Concepts of media literacy with an algorithmic focus.
Literacy in today’s online and offline environments “means being able to use the dominant symbol systems of the culture for personal, aesthetic, cultural, social, and political goals” (Hobbs & Jensen, 2018, p 4).

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Information Literacy in an Age of Algorithms from Kristen Yarmey

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Artificial Intelligence Literacy from Rogelio E. Cardona-Rivera

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more on media literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

more on news literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=news+literate

Facebook deep fake

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/jan/07/facebook-bans-deepfake-videos-in-run-up-to-us-election

Some news organisations, including the BBCNew York Times and Buzzfeed have made their own “deepfake” videos, ostensibly to spread awareness about the techniques. Those videos, while of varying quality, have all contained clear statements that they are fake.

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more on deep fake in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=deep+fake

deepfake facebook

https://www.npr.org/2020/01/07/794171662/facebook-issues-new-rules-on-deepfake-videos-targeting-manipulation

Facebook’s new ban targets videos that are manipulated to make it appear someone said words they didn’t actually say.

 

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more on deep fake in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=deep+fake
more on facebook in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook

reliable information sources

10 Journalism Brands Where You Find Real Facts Rather Than Alternative Facts

https://www.forbes.com/sites/berlinschoolofcreativeleadership/2017/02/01/10-journalism-brands-where-you-will-find-real-facts-rather-than-alternative-facts/#211616b7e9b5

Feb 1, 2017 Paul Glader

The Poynter Institute – an enlightened non-profit in St. Petersburg, Fla., that has an ownership role in the Tampa Bay Times and provides research, training and educational resources on journalism – provides many excellent online modules to help citizens improve their news media literacy.

citizens should support local and regional publications that hew to ethical journalism standards and cover local government entities.

  1. https://www.nytimes.com/
  2. https://www.wsj.com/
  3. https://www.washingtonpost.com/
  4. http://www.bbc.com/news
  5. http://www.economist.com/
  6. http://www.newyorker.com/
  7. Wire Services: The Associated PressReutersBloomberg News
  8. https://www.foreignaffairs.com/
  9. https://www.theatlantic.com/
  10. http://www.politico.com/

Runners Up:

– National Public Radio

– TIME magazine

-The Christian Science Monitor

– The Los Angeles Times (and many other regional, metropolitan daily newspapers)

– USA Today

– CNN

– NBC News

– CBS News

– ABC News

Business News Sources:

– FORBES magazine

– Bloomberg BusinessWeek magazine

– Fortune magazine

– The Financial Times newspaper

Sources of reporting and opinion from the right of the political spectrum:

  • National Review
  • The Weekly Standard

Sources of reporting and opinion from the left of the political spectrum:

– The New Republic

– The Nation

 

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

K12 media literacy

Report: Florida, Ohio called ‘advanced leaders’ in K-12 media literacy efforts

Advocacy group Media Literacy Now says 14 states have laws with “some media-literacy language” and others will consider bills this year, but some say progress “is too slow.”

https://www.educationdive.com/news/report-florida-ohio-called-advanced-leaders-in-k-12-media-literacy-effo/569879/

Erin McNeill, president and board member of Media Literacy Now

Media Literacy Now considers digital citizenship as part of media literacy — not the other way around

nine states — California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Utah — are identified as “emerging leaders” for “beginning the conversation” and consulting with experts and others.

Calls for increased attention to media literacy skills and demand from educators for training in this area increased following an outbreak of “fake news” reports associated with the 2016 presidential election. Studies and assessments showing students are easily misled by digital information have also contributed to a sense of urgency.

because the topic can fit into multiple content areas, it can also be overlooked because of other pressures on teachers. Media literacy, the group notes, also “encompasses the foundational skills of digital citizenship and internet safety including the norms of appropriate, responsible, ethical, and healthy behavior, and cyberbullying prevention.”

Lawmakers in Missouri and South Carolina have also pre-filed versions of Media Literacy Now’s model bill, the report noted, and legislation is expected in Hawaii and Arizona.

the News Literacy Project and the Center for New Literacy’s summer academy.

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more on media literacy in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

Fake Video Audio and the Election

https://www.npr.org/2019/09/02/754415386/what-you-need-to-know-about-fake-video-audio-and-the-2020-election

deep fake: definition

What are “deepfakes?”

That’s the nickname given to computer-created artificial videos or other digital material in which images are combined to create new footage that depicts events that never actually happened. The term originates from the online message board Reddit.

One initial use of the fake videos was in amateur-created pornography, in which the faces of famous Hollywood actresses were digitally placed onto that of other performers to make it appear as though the stars themselves were performing.

How difficult is it to create fake media?

It can be done with specialized software, experts say, the same way that editing programs such as Photoshop have made it simpler to manipulate still images. And specialized software itself isn’t necessary for what have been dubbed “shallow fakes” or “cheap fakes.”

Researchers also say they are working on new ways to speed up systems aimed at helping establish when video or audio has been manipulated. But it’s been called a “cat and mouse” game in which there may seldom be exact parity between fabrication and detection.

At least one state has considered legislation that would outlaw distributing election-oriented fake videos.

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more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

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