Posts Tagged ‘Blackboard’

Blackboard-Moodle breakup

LMS market after Blackboard-Moodle breakup

  • Two of the leading learning management system companies are cutting ties after a six-year partnership —  a split that Inside Higher Education reported was likely “messy.”
  • U.S.-based Blackboard and Australia’s Moodle separately announced the end to the partnership, which will mean that Blackboard won’t use the Moodle name in the future, but its Moodlerooms product will be maintained.

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more on LMS in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=LMS

LMS vendors

LMS Revival: D2L picking up new customers and showing they can listen

LMS Revival: D2L's new customers & showing they can listen

Posted by EDUCAUSE on Tuesday, August 22, 2017

LMS Revival: D2L picking up new customers and showing they can listen

By 

some_text

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more on LMS in this iMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+management

asynch and LMS online

Asynch Delivery and the LMS Still Dominate for Online Programs

By Dian Schaffhauser  05/22/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/22/asynch-delivery-and-the-lms-still-dominate-for-online-programs.aspx

a recent research project  by Quality Matters and Eduventures, the “Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE)” offers a “baseline” examination of program development, quality measures and other structural issues.

95 percent of larger programs (those with 2,500 or more online program students) are “wholly asynchronous” while 1.5 percent are mainly or completely synchronous. About three-quarters (73 percent) of mid-sized programs (schools with between 500 and 2,499 online program students) and 62 percent of smaller programs are fully asynchronous.

The asynchronous nature of this kind of education may explain why threaded discussions turned up as the most commonly named teaching and learning technique, mentioned by 27.4 percent of respondents, closely followed by practice-based learning, listed by 27.3 percent of survey participants.

Blackboard and Instructure Canvas dominated. Audio- and videoconferencing come in a “distant second,” according to the researchers. The primary brands that surfaced for those functions were Adobe Connect, Cisco WebEx, Zoom, Kaltura, Panopto, TechSmith Camtasia and Echo360.

While the LMS plays a significant role in online programming, the report pointed to a distinct lack of references to “much-hyped innovations,” such as adaptive learning, competency-based education systems, simulation or game-based learning tools. (my note: my mouth run dry of repeating every time people start becoming orgasmic about LMS, D2L in particular)

four in 10 require the use of instructional design support, three in 10 use a team approach for online course design and one in 10 outsources the work. Overall, some 80 percent of larger programs use instructional design expertise.

In the smallest programs, instructional design support is treated as a “faculty option” for 53 percent of institutions. Another 18 percent expect faculty to develop their online courses independently. For 13 percent of mid-sized programs, the faculty do their development work independently; another 64 percent may choose whether or not to bring in instructional design help. (my note: this is the SCSU ‘case’)

Measuring Quality

Among the many possible quality metrics suggested by the researchers, the five adopted most frequently for internal monitoring were:

  • Student achievement of program objectives (83 percent);
  • Student retention and graduation rates (77 percent);
  • Program reputation (48 percent);
  • Faculty training (47 percent); and
  • Student engagement measures (41 percent).

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

actual use of LMS

How people actually use Blackboard, according to Blackboard

Blackboard use

http://blog.blackboard.com/patterns-in-course-design-how-instructors-actually-use-the-lms/

My note: Bryan Alexnader finished his blog entry with this q/n: I wonder if that holds true across other LMS tools (Moodle, Sakai, Canvas, etc).
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more on use of LMS in education:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=LMS

Blackboard Learn Gets Dropbox Integration

By David Nagel 10/25/2016

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/10/25/blackboard-learn-gets-dropbox-integration.aspx

Announced at the Educause 2016 conference, Blackboard Learn users will now be able to collaborate on documents using the cloud sharing platform Dropbox.

My note: BB is only catching up with Google, which has Google Drive (~ Dropbox) and Google Classroom (~ BB). It doesn’t matter how much hype BB is trying to produce, the fact is that BB is behind.
D2L is even farther behind, without an integration of any video tool. Google has Google Hangouts and BB purchased several video conferencing tools until it got “the right one.”
D2L announce in 2010 an integration with Skype but it has not happened. Now, D2L will be double behind without integration of a cloud-based file space.

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more on LMS in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lms

LMS: how can I search its content

Q:

Hi all,

Please excuse duplication but I’m trying to get this to as many people as possible.

There are two courses in the M1/M2 years in our medical college that are extraordinarily large. In many schools it’s called the “Doctoring” course. Our university uses Blackboard as our LMS, but as there is no real search mechanism in Blackboard, the content is hard to organize and locate. I’ve been trying to think of good options for this type of course and have come up with iTunesU and Moodle with search installed and turned on.

Do any of you have other options you might recommend?

Thanks,
Max~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Max Anderson, MLIS

Instructional Designer, Undergraduate Medical Education

UIC College of Medicine
150 College of Medicine West
1819 W. Polk St. (M/C 785)
Chicago, IL 60612-7332
Phone: 312-996-5898

Fax: 312-413-3410

UGME Website: http://chicago.medicine.uic.edu/ugme

A:

On Wed, Mar 26, 2014 at 10:57 PM, matinga ragatz <matingaragatz@gmail.com> wrote:

@Max

Google Course Builder is free but you do need a bit of html/coding knowledge to get things looking right.

Post an update when you find your solution!

Cheers!!

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Docebo? It is really daunting for online teaching, got me frustrated, but very good for your needs. Or you could Just put them on GDrive in folders and link them to any website (or LMS) that has an embedded discussion forum (G Groups, any LMS Discussion forum).

———–

Ammar Merhbi
Edtech and TESOL, M.A.
Educational Technology Specialist and Head of English Department
Google Apps and Moodle Administrator (http://www.learn.djis.edu.sa )
PD Specialist

The MOOC Is Dead! Long Live Open Learning!

http://diyubook.com/2013/07/the-mooc-is-dead-long-live-open-learning/

We’re at a curious point in the hype cycle of educational innovation, where the hottest concept of the past year–Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs–is simultaneously being discovered by the mainstream media, even as the education-focused press is declaring them dead. “More Proof MOOCs are Hot,” and “MOOCs Embraced By Top Universities,” said the Wall Street Journal and USA Today last week upon the announcement that Coursera had received a $43 million round of funding to expand its offerings;
“Beyond MOOC Hype” was the nearly simultaneous headline in Inside Higher Ed.

Can MOOCs really be growing and dying at the same time?

The best way to resolve these contradictory signals is probably to accept that the MOOC, itself still an evolving innovation, is little more than a rhetorical catchall for a set of anxieties around teaching, learning, funding and connecting higher education to the digital world. This is a moment of cultural transition. Access to higher education is strained. The prices just keep rising. Questions about relevance are growing. The idea of millions of students from around the world learning from the worlds’ most famous professors at very small marginal cost, using the latest in artificial intelligence and high-bandwidth communications, is a captivating one that has drawn tens of millions in venture capital. Yet, partnerships between MOOC platforms and public institutions like SUNY and the University of California to create self-paced blended courses and multiple paths to degrees look like a sensible next step for the MOOC, but they are far from that revolutionary future. Separate ideas like blended learning and plain old online delivery seem to be blurring with and overtaking the MOOC–even Blackboard is using the term.

The time seems to be ripe for a reconsideration of the “Massive” impact of “Online” and “Open” learning. TheReclaim Open Learning initiative is a growing community of teachers, researchers and learners in higher education dedicated to this reconsideration. Supporters include the MIT Media Lab and the MacArthur Foundation-supported Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. I am honored to be associated with the project as a documentarian and beater of the drum.

Entries are currently open for our Innovation Contest, offering a $2000 incentive to either teachers or students who have projects to transform higher education in a direction that is connected and creative, is open as in open content and open as in open access, that is participatory, that takes advantage of some of the forms and practices that the MOOC also does but is not beholden to the narrow mainstream MOOC format (referring instead to some of the earlier iterations of student-created, distributed MOOCscreated by Dave Cormier, George Siemens, Stephen Downes and others.)

Current entries include a platform to facilitate peer to peer language learning, a Skype-based open-access seminar with guests from around the world, and a student-created course in educational technology. Go hereto add your entry! Deadline is August 2. Our judges include Cathy Davidson (HASTAC), Joi Ito (MIT), and Paul Kim (Stanford).

Reclaim Open Learning earlier sponsored a hackathon at the MIT Media Lab. This fall, September 27 and 28, our judges and contest winners will join us at a series of conversations and demo days to Reclaim Open Learning at the University of California, Irvine. If you’re interested in continuing the conversation, join us there or check us out online.

July 18, 2013