Archive of ‘technology literacy’ category

ISTE standards ed leaders

ISTE Releases New Standards for Education Leaders

By Team ISTE6/24/2018

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=2227&category=Press-Releases&article=
The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) today released new standards for education leaders that highlight key areas of impact.
ISTE received input and feedback on the Education Leaders Standards from over 1,300 educators and leaders from all 50 states and 36 countries.

The characteristics of effective leaders outlined in the ISTE Standards for Education Leaders are:

  1. Equity and Citizenship Advocate: Leaders use technology to increase equity, inclusion and digital citizenship practices.
  2. Visionary Planner: Leaders engage others in establishing a vision, strategic plan and ongoing evaluation cycle for transforming learning with technology.
  3. Empowering Leader: Leaders create a culture where teachers and learners are empowered to use technology in innovative ways to enrich teaching and learning.
  4. System Designer: Leaders build teams and systems to implement, sustain and continually improve the use of technology to support learning.
  5. Connected Learner: Leaders model and promote continuous professional learning for themselves and others.

The ISTE Standards are a framework for rethinking education and empowering learners. ISTE began a cycle of updating the widely used standards when it released the new ISTE Standards for Students (in 2016), followed by the ISTE Standards for Educators (in 2017), culminating with the ISTE Standards for Education Leaders this year.

“As administrators, our responsibilities cover many areas, including technology, which has become a necessary component of living and work,” said Curt Mould, director of digital media, innovation and strategy at Sun Prairie Area School District in Wisconsin. “The world our students are walking into is increasingly global and diverse – and technology is often the leverage point needed to bring global and diverse ideas together. In this regard, technology can be a game-changer in our schools. We need a new plan to help operationalize our work for the long-term benefit of our students.”

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more on ISTE standards in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=iste+standards

more on technology and ed leaders in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+ed+leaders

European Commission and cryptocurrency

EU Commission may consider regulating cryptocurrencies before 2019

upcoming Action Plan on FinTech and on the EU’s position at the upcoming G20 in Buenos Aires,” said Dombrovskis, in reference to the financial technology that describes an emerging financial services sector. “We have not excluded the possibility to move ahead (by regulating cryptocurrencies) at the EU level if we see, for example, risks emerging but no clear international response to the threat.”

Despite what might be interpreted as a sombre warning about the potential downside cryptocurrencies might have for investors, Dombrovskis was quick to point out that he remained positive about initial coin offerings (ICOs), saying the EU – one of the smaller traders of cryptocurrencies – needed to work with other G20 nations to address any potential risks.

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more on cryptocurrency in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cryptocurrency

transform education via digital tools

Digital tools can transform, not just replicate, the teaching and learning experience

Commentary: The SAMR and TPACK models of technology implementation can help schools as they transition to using more digital tools.

By EdScoop Staff  MAY 8, 2018 2:37 PM

https://edscoop.com/digital-tools-can-transform-not-just-replicate-the-teaching-and-learning-experience

The SAMR (substitution, augmentation, modification, redefinition) model and TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge) model can help schools as they transition to using more digital tools.

In a recent edWebinar, Michelle Luhtala, library department chair at New Canaan High School in Connecticut, reviewed these models and discussed apps that can take teaching, learning and reading to the next level.

The SAMR model determines the level of technology integration of a tool: substitution, which doesn’t add value; augmentation, which adds a few features with only a little improvement; modification, which redesigns some structures; and redefinition, which allows the creation of new tasks and is the ultimate learning goal. Transformation in how educators are teaching and how students are understanding content happens in the modification and redefinition parts of the model.

MackinVIA’s Classroom allows educators to create a collection of digital content for students; build assignment around it; and share the collection, or an individual book, with the classroom. Students can also highlight text, make annotations, and save these to Google Drive.

Emerging Tech for Schools and Libraries is a free professional learning community where school librarians, teachers, and administrators can explore all the ways to integrate technology and 21st century learning into school library programs.

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more on the SAMR model in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=samr

issues with live streaming social media

Facebook Rolls Out New Live Video Tools

Join Erik Fisher and Kim Reynolds live for the Social Media Marketing Talk Show as we explore New Facebook Live Video Tools with David Foster, New Instagram Business Tools with Jeff Sieh and more breaking social media marketing news of the week!Join the discussion here: https://www.crowdcast.io/e/smelive5-11-18/register

Posted by Social Media Examiner on Friday, May 11, 2018

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more on Facebook Live in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook+live

Headphones Damage Hearing

Do Loud Headphones Damage Your Hearing?

Your headphones are probably damaging your ears (via Circuit Breaker)

Posted by NowThis Future on Saturday, May 12, 2018

Overselling of Education Technology

The Overselling of Education Technology

By Alfie Kohn     Mar 16, 2016

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-03-16-the-overselling-of-education-technology

Basically, my response to ed tech is “It depends.” And one key consideration on which it depends is the reason given for supporting it.

ads in education periodicals, booths at conferences, and advocacy organizations are selling not only specific kinds of software but the whole idea that ed tech is de rigueur for any school that doesn’t want to risk being tagged as “twentieth century.”

Other people, particularly politicians, defend technology on the grounds that it will keep our students “competitive in the global economy.” This catch-all justification has been invoked to support other dubious policies, including highly prescriptive, one-size-fits-all national curriculum standards. It’s based on two premises: that decisions about children’s learning should be driven by economic considerations, and that people in other countries should be seen primarily as rivals to be defeated.

But the rationale that I find most disturbing—despite, or perhaps because of, the fact that it’s rarely made explicit—is the idea that technology will increase our efficiency…at teaching the same way that children have been taught for a very long time.

a deeper question: “What kinds of learning should be taking place in those schools?” If we favor an approach by which students actively construct meaning, an interactive process that involves a deep understanding of ideas and emerges from the interests and questions of the learners themselves, well, then we’d be open to the kinds of technology that truly support this kind of inquiry. Show me something that helps kids create, design, produce, construct—and I’m on board. Show me something that helps them make things collaboratively (rather than just on their own), and I’m even more interested—although it’s important to keep in mind that meaningful learning never requires technology, so even here we should object whenever we’re told that software (or a device with a screen) is essential.

more worrisome are the variants of ed tech that deal with grades and tests, making them even more destructive than they already are: putting grades online (thereby increasing their salience and their damaging effects), using computers to administer tests and score essays, and setting up “embedded” assessment that’s marketed as “competency-based.”

we shouldn’t confuse personalized learning with personal learning. The first involves adjusting the difficulty level of prefabricated skills-based exercises based on students’ test scores, and it requires the purchase of software. The second involves working with each student to create projects of intellectual discovery that reflect his or her unique needs and interests, and it requires the presence of a caring teacher who knows each child well.

a recent review found that studies of tech-based personalized instruction “show mixed results ranging from modest impacts to no impact” – despite the fact that it’s remarkably expensive. In fact, ed tech of various kinds has made headlines lately for reasons that can’t be welcome to its proponents. According to an article in Education Week, “a host of national and regional surveys suggest that teachers are far more likely to use tech to make their own jobs easier and to supplement traditional instructional strategies than to put students in control of their own learning.” Last fall, meanwhile, OECD reportednegative outcomes when students spent a lot of time using computers, while Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes

Ed tech is increasingly making its way even into classrooms for young children. And the federal government is pushing this stuff unreservedly: Check out the U.S. Office of Education Technology’s 2016 plan recommending greater use of “embedded” assessment, which “includes ongoing gathering and sharing of data,” plus, in a development that seems inevitable in retrospect, a tech-based program to foster a “growth mindset” in children. There’s much more in that plan, too—virtually all of it, as blogger Emily Talmage points out, uncannily aligned with the wish list of the Digital Learning Council, a group consisting largely of conservative advocacy groups and foundations, and corporations with a financial interest in promoting ed tech.

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more on technology literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+literacy

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