Technology Instruction available free

Student’s relationship with technology is complex. They recognize its value but still need guidance when it comes to better using it for academics.

Educause’s ECAR Study, 2013

InforMedia Services

IMS faculty would be happy to meet with you or your group at your convenience.
Please request using this Google Form: or
by email: |

How you can reach us:

Services we provide:

  • Instruct and collaborate with faculty, staff and students on specific computer, Cloud and mobile applications
  • Assist faculty in course design and instruction to incorporate SCSU’s resources
  • Join faculty in the classroom instructional designto assist students with learning technology application for the class
  • Consult with faculty on instructional design issues, particularly those that use the World Wide Web, multimedia techniques and interactivity
  • Collaborate with faculty, staff and students on technology-related projects
  • Work with campus units in technology planning and acquisition
  • Respond to faculty, staff and students requests and technology developments




1google2 copy 


adobe connect2

How PowerPoint is killing critical thought

Bored students is the least of it – the bullet point-ization of information is making us stupid and irresponsible

The genesis story runs like this: from the late 1950s corporations began to realise that, rather than going to the trouble of developing new products they hoped would meet a need, they could use marketeers to create the perception of need, then develop products to meet it (a shift brilliantly dramatised in the TV series Mad Men). To do this, different departments had to be able to speak to each other, to sell ideas internally. So while there had always been meetings, now there were meetings about meetings and – hey presto! – the modern world was born.

The presentational precursor to PowerPoint was the overhead projector, which is why PP screens are still called “slides”. The program owes most to Whitfield Diffie, one of the time lords of online cryptography, but it was quickly snapped up by Microsoft. Its coding/marketing roots are intrinsic to its cognitive style, being relentlessly linear and encouraging short, affirmative, jargonesque assertions: arguments that are resolved, untroubled by shades of grey.

It’s no coincidence that the two most famous PowerPoint presentations are: a) the one presented to Nasa managers by engineers, explaining with unarguable illogic why damaged tiles on the space shuttle Columbia were probably nothing to fret about; and b) General Colin Powell’s equally fuzzy pitch for war with Iraq. Now, blaming PowerPoint for Iraq would be a bit like blaming Darwin for Donald Trump, but the program made scrutiny of the case harder. Not for nothing did Brigadier General McMaster, of the US military, subsequently liken the proliferation of PP presentation in the military to an “internal threat”, saying: “It’s dangerous because it can create the illusion of understanding and the illusion of control. Some problems are not bullet-izable.

More on the topic in this blog:

maximise PowerPoint’s true potential.

Course content

  • An introduction to the principles of data visualisation
  • Storytelling with PowerPoint
  • How to design using PowerPoint
  • Creating compelling narratives
  • Practical exercise: create a sample slide using pen and paper
  • Tools and further reading
  • Q&A and group discussion


Digital Teacher

10 Lessons For The Digital Teacher
purpose of my curriculum planning

10 Lessons For The Digital Teacher

  • Manage your time
  • Be organized in your teaching
  • Measure success
  • Be purposeful
  • Find a mentor
  • Always be learning
  • Reflect on your teaching
  • Grow a personal learning network
  • Create teaching files
  • Be open

transcription tool

it is a hot topic [and contested] topic at MnSCU, considering ADA. In the MnSCU case, it is video and audio material, here, it is text based. The crowdsourcing idea applies, though…

From: <> on behalf of Ronald Houk <>
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2015 10:01 AM
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Crowdsourced transcription tool?


Hi Kathryn,

Scripto looks like an interesting project.


On Thu, Sep 10, 2015 at 8:31 AM, Kathryn Frederick (Library) <> wrote:


We recently had preservation work done on a number of 16th – 18th century land patents. We will be digitizing them, and would like to transcribe the documents which are hand-written in English and, in some cases, Latin.

Is anyone aware of a tool that would allow us to crowdsource the transcription?

Thanks for any suggestions,



Kathryn Frederick

Head of Digital and Collection Services

Lucy Scribner Library – Skidmore College

Saratoga Springs, NY 12866

(518) 580-5505
To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see

Ronald Houk ☕
Assistant Director
Ottumwa Public Library
102 W. Fourth Street
Ottumwa, IA 52501


Subject: Re: [lita-l] Crowdsourced transcription tool?


If you’re interested in a fully hosted solution, you might also check out The underlying software is open source and you can install it locally as well.

Ben Brumfield, the guy who developed FromThePage also has a blog,, which has some useful information about different systems.

Danielle Cunniff Plumer

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

presentation tools for teaching

21 Top Presentation Tools for Teachers

As repeated by me for years, PPT should not be the one and only. Here are some choices. Please consider that IMS delivers workshops, one-on-one sessions and class sessions on the applications listed below:

What Works on What Device

Tool Windows Mac iPad iPad App Chromebook Chromebook App Android
Android App
Animoto Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Bunkr Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
Canva Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
Clear Slide Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Creedoo Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
eMaze Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
Flowvella No Yes Yes No No No No No
Goanimate Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
Google Slides Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Haiku Deck Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No
Impress Yes Yes No No No Yes No No
Keynote No Yes Yes Yes No No No No
KnowledgeVision Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No
MoveNote Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
PearDeck Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
PowerPoint Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes
PowerPoint Online Yes Yes No No No Yes No Yes
PowToon Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes Yes No
Prezi Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Slidedog Yes No No No No No No No
Visme Yes Yes Yes No Yes No Yes No

More on this topic at the IMS blog:

reading fine print

Practical advice to read fine print

from informal Facebook Discussion: with age and / or feeble eyes, how one can read fine print

6 Must-Have Magnifier Apps to Use for Free on Your Android Device 


social media administration

LITA discussion thread on how social media should be run at an academic library:

Very much different from where I am at. But that’s not new, I have voiced the fallacies often in the last 5 years rather frequently.

From: [] On Behalf Of Alex Herzberg
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2015 11:39 AM
Subject: RE: [lita-l] social media administration

Hi Allison,

The Loyola/Notre Dame Library’s social media is run by a committee of 4 full-time staff: two from research & instruction, one from circulation, and one from archives. I’m the committee chair but we all take weekly shifts for posting and monitoring the accounts. This model of sharing the workload has been really effective for us!

I’m happy to answer any questions you might have.


Alex Herzberg, MLS

Online Learning Librarian

Business Liaison

Loyola/Notre Dame Library

200 Winston Avenue

Baltimore, MD 21212


From: [] On Behalf Of Lisa Rabey
Sent: Thursday, August 27, 2015 6:16 AM
Subject: Re: [lita-l] social media administration


At my last position, I was the systems and web librarian, which included social media. I did the following:


Managed all of the social media accounts (FB, Twitter, Flickr, Tumblr)

Used Hootsuite to post date posts in Twitter.

Used FB to post date posts in FB

Created singular branding across all sites

Created social media best practices

Created social media policy in congruent with the college’s s AUP

Managed the backend of the blog

— Created a calendar for blog post ideas

— Enlisted other people to provide additional content

— edited blog posts from other posters


I’d say I spent 2-5 hours a week on the social media, most of which I managed when I was the reference desk.


The person who replaced me dumped all of the above. So there’s that.



—–Original Message—–
From: [] On Behalf Of Erik Sandall
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [lita-l] social media administration


Hi Allison,


As a librarian and webmaster, I split my time between library and IT.

I’m responsible for the administration and management of our social media accounts. I also post a little, and there are three others (one librarian, two non-libs) who also contribute content.


It’s worked out very well having a variety of staff across departments contributing to our social media efforts. I highly recommend it.