Searching for "digital literacy"

media, digital literacy and fake news

An interactive discussion on media, digital literacy and fake news

Bryan Alexander’s Future Trends Forum w/ Special Guest Jennifer Sparrow

https://shindig.com/login/event/ftf-sparrow

On this week’s Future Trends Forum, Bryan Alexander and Jennifer Sparrow, the Senior Director of Teaching and Learning with Technology at Penn State University, will explore the significance of media and digital literacy, especially in the era of fake news.

Jennifer and Bryan will further dissect how digital literacy and fluency differ, and why this difference is important.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+education

digital literacy Confucius Institute

Levi Johnson and students SCSU Confucius Institute

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, August 23, 2018

Plan for Fall 2018

August 23, 2018.

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be assisting in your instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

  1. Social Media for 2018
    1. WeChat and the connection to other social media
      1. building a community on WeChat
    2. SCSU Edublog http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ci/
      1. the idea of a blog. the advantages compared to SM such as WeChat / Facebook
    3. Reflections
      1. Multimedia
    4. Connecting blogs to social media (WeChat and similar)
  2. Digital Literacy instruction
    1. what is digital literacy and how does it differ from other literacies? Why is it important?
      What other literacies must be considered when speaking about DL? E.g. media literacy: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
    2. Internet Resources
        1. How do we search?
          1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
          2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
          3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
        2. Custom Search Engine:
          http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
        3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services
          https://www.semanticscholar.org/
        4. subject guide 3
        5. –Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)Filtersfilters
        6. ++++++++++++++++
          Search criteriasearch_criteria

      sdfgsdfg

    3. citation management software to organize bibliographic information
    4. Refworkhttps://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
    5. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
      1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
      2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
        http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/

Digital Literacy for SPED 405

Digital Literacy for SPED 405. Behavior Theories and Practices in Special Education.

Instructor Mark Markell. mamarkell@stcloudstate.edu Mondays, 5:30 – 8:20 PM. SOE A235

Preliminary Plan for Monday, Sept 10, 5:45 PM to 8 PM

Introduction – who are the students in this class. About myself: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty Contact info, “embedded” librarian idea – I am available to help during the semester with research and papers

about 40 min: Intro to the library: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/
15 min for a Virtual Reality tours of the Library + quiz on how well they learned the library:
http://bit.ly/VRlib
and 360 degree video on BYOD:
Play a scavenger hunt IN THE LIBRARY: http://bit.ly/learnlib
The VR (virtual reality) and AR (augmented reality) component; why is it important?
why is this technology brought up to a SPED class?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/18/immersive-journalism/
autism: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/09/10/sound-and-brain/
Social emotional learning
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/31/vr-ar-sel-empathy/
(transition to the next topic – digital literacy)

about 50 min:

  1. Digital Literacy

How important is technology in our life? Profession?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/20/employee-evolution/

Do you think technology overlaps with the broad field of special education? How?
How do you define technology? What falls under “technology?”

What is “digital literacy?” Do we need to be literate in that sense? How does it differ from technology literacy?
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Additional readings on “digital literacy”
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/23/nmc-digital-literacy/

Digital Citizenship: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/19/digital-citizenship-info/
Play Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/e844253f-b5dd-4a91-b096-b6ff777e6dd7
Privacy and surveillance: how does these two issues affect your students? Does it affect them more? if so, how?  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/08/21/ai-tracks-students-writings/

Social Media:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/

Is Social Media part of digital literacy? Why? How SM can help us become more literate?

Digital Storytelling:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

How is digital storytelling essential in digital literacy?

about 50 min:

  1. Fake News and Research

Syllabus: Teaching Media Manipulation: https://datasociety.net/pubs/oh/DataAndSociety_Syllabus-MediaManipulationAndDisinformationOnline.pdf

#FakeNews is a very timely and controversial issue. in 2-3 min choose your best source on this issue. 1. Mind the prevalence of resources in the 21st century 2. Mind the necessity to evaluate a) the veracity of your courses b) the quality of your sources (the fact that they are “true” does not mean that they are the best). Be prepared to name your source and defend its quality.
How do you determine your sources? How do you decide the reliability of your sources? Are you sure you can distinguish “good” from “bad?”
Compare this entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites
to this entry: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview to understand the scope

Do you know any fact checking sites? Can you identify spot sponsored content? Do you understand syndication? What do you understand under “media literacy,” “news literacy,” “information literacy.”  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

Why do we need to explore the “fake news” phenomenon? Do you find it relevant to your professional development?

Let’s watch another video and play this Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/21379a63-b67c-4897-a2cd-66e7d1c83027

So, how do we do academic research? Let’s play another Kahoot: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e09bb66-4d87-44a5-af21-c8f3d7ce23de
If you to structure this Kahoot, what are the questions, you will ask? What are the main steps in achieving successful research for your paper?

  • Research using social media

what is social media (examples). why is called SM? why is so popular? what makes it so popular?

use SM tools for your research and education:

– Determining your topic. How to?
Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com
Facebook, Twitter – hashtags (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
LinkedIn Groups
YouTube and Slideshare (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest for visual aids (like YouTube they are media repositories)

Academia.com (https://www.academia.edu/Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” https://www.academia.edu/31942069_Facebook_for_Academics_The_Convergence_of_Self-Branding_and_Social_Media_Logic_on_Academia.edu

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/

– collecting and managing your resources:
Delicious https://del.icio.us/
Diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
Evernote: evernote.com OneNote (Microsoft)

blogs and wikis for collecting data and collaborating

– Managing and sharing your information:
Refworks,
Zotero https://www.zotero.org/,
Mendeley, https://www.mendeley.com/

– Testing your work against your peers (globally):

Wikipedia:
First step:Using Wikipedia.Second step: Contributing to Wikipedia (editing a page). Third step: Contributing to Wikipedia (creating a page)  https://www.evernote.com/shard/s101/sh/ef743d1a-4516-47fe-bc5b-408f29a9dcb9/52d79bfa20ee087900764eb6a407ec86

– presenting your information


please use this form to cast your feedback. Please feel free to fill out only the relevant questions:
http://bit.ly/imseval

digital literacy from ISTE

4 things to know about teaching digital literacy to refugees

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=2209
Digital literacy is not a given
The children of these adult refugees don’t struggle as much with technical skills as their parents do because they attend American schools with access to technology.
Access can be a barrier to inclusion
Lack of digital access can hamper refugees in many ways. An Australian study found that the lack of tech skills and access to technology affected refugees’ ability to integrate into their new communities.
Communication comes in many varieties

There are many slang terms, acronyms, idioms and confusing words like “mouse” rapidly thrown at these new arrivals.

We found a universal language using memes. Often dismissed as trivial and silly, memes can communicate across cultures. The image paired with a caption can immediately convey a message or feeling.

Creating global collaborators

Many refugees have lived in multiple countries, speak many languages and have family members living overseas. A hallmark of being a global collaborator, as outlined in the ISTE Standards for Students, is using digital tools to connect with learners from a variety of backgrounds and cultures, engaging with them in ways that broaden mutual understanding and learning.

Resources for teaching refugees

If you have refugees in your classroom, here are some organizations that offer resources you can incorporate into classroom settings.

The Wonderment. This nonprofit connects students from all around the world in collaborative service projects.

UNICEF. This global organization has up-to-date reports on the refugee and migrant crisis as well as ways you can get involved.

International Rescue Committee. This nonprofit helps refugees resettle in their community as well as provide both international and local resources.

Carrie Rogers-Whitehead is an ISTE member and CEO of Digital Respons-Ability. Her company teaches digital citizenship to refugees and she plans to publish findings about this work

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

for more info on refugees and immigrants, pls consider this blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/refugeesandmigrants/

digital literacy ENGL 101

English 101 materials for discussion on digital literacy.

Jamie Heiman.

All materials on #DigitalLiteracy in the IMS blog here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Scenario for digital literacy in English classes:

What do virtual reality, BuzzFeed quizzes and essay writing have in common?

https://www.educationdive.com/news/what-do-virtual-reality-buzzfeed-quizzes-and-essay-writing-have-in-common/527868/

July 18, 2018

high school students now create infographics, BuzzFeed-like quizzes and even virtual reality (VR) experiences to illustrate how they can research, write and express their thoughts.

technology — using sites like CoSpaces Edu and content learning system Schoology (my note: the equivalnet of D2L at SCSU) — to engage and empower her students.

Thinklink, during a session called “Virtually Not an Essay: Technological Alternatives to a standard essay assignment.” (see this blog materials on ThingLink and like here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=thinglink. The author made typo by calling the app “ThinKlink, instead of ThinGlink. Also, to use Thinglink’s Video 360 editor, the free account is not sufficient and the $125/month upgrade is needed. Not a good solution for education)

Jamie: I would love to discuss with you #infographics and #Thinglink for use in your courses and the Departmental course.

Digital literacy (DL): options, ideas, possibilities

rethinking digital literacy

Rethinking Digital Literacy to Serve Library Staff and Users
facilitated by Paul Signorelli

4-week eCourse
Beginning Monday, May 14, 2018

What is digital literacy? Do you know how you can foster digital literacy through formal and informal learning opportunities for your library staff and users?

Supporting digital literacy still remains an important part of library staff members’ work, but sometimes we struggle to agree on a simple, meaningful definition of the term. In this four-week eCourse, training/learning specialist Paul Signorelli begins by exploring a variety of definitions, focusing on work by a few leading proponents of the need to foster digital literacy among people of all ages and backgrounds. He explores a variety of digital-literacy resources – including case studies of how we creatively approach digital-literacy learning opportunities for library staff and users, and explores a variety of digital tools that will help to encourage further understanding of this topic.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

NMC digital literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

NMC Releases Second Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

The New Media Consortium (NMC) has released Digital Literacy in Higher Education, Part II: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief, a follow-up to its 2016 strategic brief on digital literacy.

PDF available here.
2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II-ycykt3

But what does it really mean to be digitally literate, and which standards do we use?” said Dr. Eden Dahlstrom, NMC Executive Director. “This report sheds light on the meaning and impact of digital literacy using cross-cultural and multi-disciplinary approaches, highlighting frameworks and exemplars in practice.

NMC’s report has identified a need for institutions and thought leaders to consider the ways in which content creation is unequally expressed throughout the world. In an examination of digital literacy within European, Middle Eastern, and African nations (EMEA), research has surfaced unequal access to information technology based on inequalities of economics, gender, race, and political divides.

2020 2015
1. Complex Problem Solving 1. Complex Problem Solving
2. Critical Thinking 2. Coordinating with Others
3. Creativity 3. People  Management
4. People  Management 4. Critical Thinking
5. Coordinating with Others 5. Negotiation
6. Emotional  Intelligence 6. Quality Control
7. Judgment and Decision Making 7. Service  Orientation
8. Service  Orientation 8. Judgment and Decision Making
9. Negotiation 9. Active Listening
10. Cognitive  Flexibility 10. Creativity

Digital tools themselves are merely enablers, pushing the envelope of  what learners can create. No longer is it acceptable for students to be passive consumers of content; they can contribute to the local and global knowledge ecosystem, learning through the act of producing and discussing rich media, applications, and objects. In the words of many institutional mission statements, students do not have to wait until they graduate to change the world.

Using readily available  digital  content  creation tools (e.g., video production and editing, web and graphic tools), students are evolving into digital storytellers,

digital literacy now encompasses the important skills of being able to coordinate with others to create something truly original that neither mind would fathom independently.

The ability to discern credible from inaccurate resources is foundational to digital literacy. my note: #Fakenews

A lack of broad consensus on the meaning of digital literacy still hinders its uptake, although a growing  body  of research is helping higher education professionals better navigate the continuous adjustments to the field brought about by emerging pedagogies and technologies.

Information literacy is a nearly universal component within these digital literacy frameworks. Critically finding, assessing, and using digital content within the vast and sometimes chaotic internet appears as a vital skill in almost every account, including those published beyond libraries. In contrast, media literacy is less widely included in digital literacy publications,  possibly  due  to  a  focus  on  scholarly, rather than popular, materials. Digital literacies ultimately combine information and media literacy.

United States digital literacy frameworks tend to  focus  on  educational  policy details and personal empowerment,  the  latter  encouraging  learners  to  become  more  effective students, better creators, smarter information consumers, and more influential members of their community.

National policies are vitally important in European digital literacy work, unsurprising for a continent well populated with nation-states and struggling to redefine itself… this recommendation for Balkan digital strategy: “Media and information education (with an emphasis on critical thinking and switching from consumption to action) should start at early ages, but address all ages.”

African digital literacy is more business-oriented. Frameworks often speak to job skills and digital entrepreneurship. New skills and professions are emphasized, symbolized by the call for “new collar” positions.

Middle Eastern nations offer yet another variation, with a strong focus on media literacy. As with other regions, this can be a response to countries with strong state influence or control over local media. It can  also  represent  a  drive  to  produce  more  locally-sourced  content,  as  opposed  to  consuming

Digital literacy is a complex phenomenon in 2017, when considered internationally. Nations  and regions are creating ways to help their populations grapple with the digital revolution that are shaped by their local situations. In doing so, they cut across the genealogy of digital literacies, touching on its historical components: information literacy, digital skills, and media literacy.

2017-nmc-strategic-brief-digital-literacy-in-higher-education-II-ycykt3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Does Digital Literacy Change Pedagogy?

Students are not all digital natives, and do not necessarily have the same level of capabilities. Some need to be taught to use online tools (such as how to navigate a LMS) for learning. However, once digital literacy skills for staff and students are explicitly recognized as important for learning and teaching, critical drivers for pedagogical change are in place.

Pedagogy that uses an inquiry based/problem solving approach is a great framework to enhance the use and practice of digital skills/capabilities in the classroom.

The current gap between students’ information literacy skills and their need  to  internalize  digital literacy competencies creates an opportunity for academic librarians to support students  in  the pursuit of civic online reasoning at the core of NMC’s multimodal model of three digital literacies. Academic librarians need a new strategy that evolves information literacy to an expanded role educating digitally literate students. Let’s build a new model in which academic librarians are  entrepreneurial collaborators with faculty,55  supporting  their  classroom  efforts  to  help  students become responsible sharers and commentators of news on social media.

“Digital literacy is not just about ensuring that students can use the latest technologies, but also developing skills to select the right tools for a particular context to deepen their learning outcomes and engage in creative problem-solving”

There is a disconnect between how students experience and interact with technology in their personal lives and how they use technology in their roles as  students.  Yes, students are digitally savvy, and yes,  universities  have  a  role  in  questioning  (insightfully  of  course) their sometimes brash digital savviness. We have a situation where students are expecting more, but (as I see it) cannot provide a clear demand, while faculty are unable to walk in  the  shoes  of  the students.

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

digital literacy ala

Rethinking Digital Literacy
facilitated by Paul Signorelli  4-week eCourse Beginning Monday, May 1, 2017

http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11469&zbrandid=4634&zidType=CH&zid=43393326&zsubscriberId=1026665847&zbdom=http://ala-publishing.informz.net

Learning outcomes

After participating in this course, you will be able to:

  • incorporate ever-evolving definitions of digital literacy into learning opportunities
  • draw upon a variety of digital resources to create digital-learning opportunities
  • seek additional resources that you can use in your continuing efforts to keep up with new developments in digital literacy in libraries and other learning organizations

What is digital literacy? Do you know how you can foster digital literacy through formal and informal learning opportunities for your library staff and users?

Supporting digital literacy still remains an important part of library staff members’ work, but sometimes we struggle to agree on a simple, meaningful definition of the term. In this four-week eCourse, training/learning specialist Paul Signorelli will begin by exploring a variety of definitions, focusing on work by a few leading proponents of the need to foster digital literacy among people of all ages and backgrounds. He will explore a variety of digital-literacy resources – including case studies of how we creatively approach digital-literacy learning opportunities for library staff and users, and will explore a variety of digital tools that will help to encourage further understanding of this topic.

Now, who is ready to build their digital-literacy skills and help their users become digitally literate as well?

eCourse Outline

Part 1: Digital Literacy: Initial Definitions and Explorations

Part 2: Digital Literacy: Crap Detection and Other Skills and Tools

  • Exploring Howard Rheingold’s approach to crap detection and other digital literacy/net literacy skills
  • Participation, collaboration, creativity, and experimentation as digital-literacy skills
  • Building our digital-literacy toolkit

Part 3: Digital Literacy in Learning

  • The varying digital literacy needs of our youngest students, of teens, and of adults
  • Exploring various online resources supporting our digital-literacy training-teaching-learning efforts
  • The myth of the digital native

Part 4: Fostering Digital Literacy: Creating Within a Digital Environment

  • Creating a framework to promote digital literacy
  • Designing workshops and other learning opportunities
  • Keeping up in an evolving digital literacy landscape

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Digital Literacy for Anthropology

Upper level anthropology of Native N American class w Kelly Branam Macauley

short link to this presentation: http://bit.ly/lib4anthr

Plamen Miltenoff: I give you the intersection of technology + library and information science = digital literacy + doctoral studies in education and psychology = educational technology.
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
relevant classes I teach and might be of interest for you:
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/. if you want to survey the class, here is the FB group page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LIB290/
and
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

the topic is Social Media and research; research in the digital age

  • General issues

#FakeNews

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

Class assignment (you will need a laptop, tablet and/or smart phone. If don’t have one, team up with your peer nearest you): #FakeNews is a very timely and controversial issue. in 2-3 min choose your best source on this issue. 1. Mind the prevalence of resources in the 21st century 2. Mind the necessity to evaluate a) the veracity of your courses b) the quality of your sources (the fact that they are “true” does not mean that they are the best). Be prepared to name your source and defend its quality.
How do you determine your sources? How do you decide the reliability of your sources? Are you sure you can distinguish “good” from “bad?”
Compare this entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fake_news_websites
to this entry: https://docs.google.com/document/d/10eA5-mCZLSS4MQY5QGb5ewC3VAL6pLkT53V_81ZyitM/preview to understand the scope

Do you know any fact checking sites? Can you identify spot sponsored content? Do you understand syndication? What do you understand under “media literacy,” “news literacy,” “information literacy.”  http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

Need more info? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
Need even more info? http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

  • Academic research

http://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/:
the online dbases, the subject guides,
https://scholar.google.com/
Class assignment (you will need a laptop, tablet and/or smart phone. If don’t have one, team up with your peer nearest you): Research a topic in your class (keyword) using “heavy duty” (peer-reviewed) literature – 2-3 min.

Please pull out your smartphones, go to your Internet browser and and type: kahoot.it or click on the link: https://play.kahoot.it/

Academic research: https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/e2d6a15f-6361-4e21-96f9-d054f1d8e49b
https://play.kahoot.it/#/k/5e09bb66-4d87-44a5-af21-c8f3d7ce23de

  • Research using social media

what is social media (examples). why is called SM? why is so popular? what makes it so popular?

use SM tools for your research and education:

– Determining your topic. How to?
Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com
Facebook, Twitter – hashtags (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
LinkedIn Groups
YouTube and Slideshare (class assignment 2-3 min to search)
Flickr, Instagram, Pinterest for visual aids (like YouTube they are media repositories)

Academia.com (https://www.academia.edu/) Academia.edu, a paper-sharing social network that has been informally dubbed “Facebook for academics,” https://www.academia.edu/31942069_Facebook_for_Academics_The_Convergence_of_Self-Branding_and_Social_Media_Logic_on_Academia.edu

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/

– collecting and managing your resources:
Delicious https://del.icio.us/
Diigo: https://www.diigo.com/
Evernote: evernote.com OneNote (Microsoft)

blogs and wikis for collecting data and collaborating

– Managing and sharing your information:
Refworks,
Zotero https://www.zotero.org/,
Mendeley, https://www.mendeley.com/

– Testing your work against your peers (globally):

Wikipedia:
First step:Using Wikipedia.Second step: Contributing to Wikipedia (editing a page). Third step: Contributing to Wikipedia (creating a page)  https://www.evernote.com/shard/s101/sh/ef743d1a-4516-47fe-bc5b-408f29a9dcb9/52d79bfa20ee087900764eb6a407ec86

– presenting your information


please use this form to cast your feedback. Please feel free to fill out only the relevant questions:
http://bit.ly/imseval

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more on digital literacy for Anthropology classes in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=anthropology

digital literacy for GLST 495

Digital Literacy for GLST 495

short link: http://bit.ly/glst495

Prof. Misha Blinnikov

  1. How do we search?
    1. SCSU Resources
      1. https://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=GEOG
    2. Google and/vs. Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    3. SCSU online dbases
    4. Academia.com and ResearchGate.com
    5. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ ,
      http://smallbusiness.chron.com/difference-between-digg-reddit-68203.html
      Quora https://www.quora.com/
    6. Interlibrary Loan ILL http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/services/illrequest.asp
    7. OER (Open Educational Resources)
    8. Big Data
  2. Basic Research Resources
    1. Concept mapping (???)
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=concept+map
    2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
      Refworks: https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
      EasyBib: http://www.easybib.com/
      Zotero: https://www.zotero.org/
      Mendeley: https://www.mendeley.com/
    3. Setting up social networking to gather articles and other research information
      LinkedIn Groups
      Facebook Groups
      Pinterest Boards
  3. Social media and its importance for the topic research and the dissertation research:
    1. Web 2.0 tools: e.g. Diigo.com; Evernote.com
    2. Facebook, Twitter
    3. blog.stcloudstate.edu

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