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Digital Storytelling for EDAD 652

Community Relations for Administrators EDAD 652

Instructor Kay Worner

A discussion with Kay’s class of school administrators about the use of digital storytelling as a tool for community relations.

discussion based on LIB 490/590
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

  • Introduction (5-10 min)
    Plamen: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
    students: interests and related information
  • Group assignment (5-10 min)
    Effective communication strategies. List 3-5 and discuss the pros and cons (what makes them effective and are there any impediments, limitations)
  • Class discussion on effective communication strategies: based on the group work findings, how do you think digital storytelling may be [can it be] an effective communication tool

What is Storytelling? How does it differ from Digital Storytelling?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling

Rossiter & Garcia (2010)  consider “digital stories are short vignettes that combine the art of telling stories with multimedia objects including images, audio, and video” (p. 37)

Is Digital Storytelling more then just storytelling on technology steroids?

What is Digital Storytelling (DS) for school leadership? A bibliographic research reveals a plenitude of research on DS in the classroom, for educators, but not much for educational leaders.
Guajardo, Oliver, Rodrigez, Valcez, Cantu, & Guajardo (2011) view digital storytelling for emerging educational leaders as “as a process for data creation, analysis, and synthesis.”

There is information for corporate leaders or community leaders and DS, but not much for ed leaders.

Let’s create our own understanding of digital storytelling for educational leaders.

Basic definitions, concepts and processes.

  • Learn about Web 1.0 versus Web 2.0; the Cloud; transliteracy and multiliteracy

Multimodal Literacy refers to meaning-making that occurs through the reading, viewing, understanding, responding to and producing and interacting with multimedia and digital texts. It may include oral and gestural modes of talking, listening and dramatising as well as writing, designing and producing such texts. The processing of modes, such as image, words, sound and movement within texts can occur simultaneously and is often cohesive and synchronous. Sometimes specific modes may dominate.

http://guides.library.stonybrook.edu/digital-storytelling

  • Social Media and digital storytelling
    which social media tools would you employ to ensure a digital story happening?

When you hear the term, Digital Storytelling, do you immediately consider Social Media?

IT’S A MINDSET – NOT A SKILL
http://turndog.co/2015/06/16/how-to-use-social-media-in-your-digital-storytelling/

Share Your Brand’s (School?) Story
https://www.postplanner.com/digital-storytelling-techniques-secret-sauce-social-media/

  • group work (15-20) min
    split in groups of 3: an ed leader, a media specialist (or teacher with technology background) and a teacher (to represent a school committee on community relations)
    you have 5 min to research (Internet, access to school resources) and 5-10 min to come up with a strategy for use of digital storytelling for expanding and improving community relationship
    Base your strategy on existing examples.
    E.g.:
    Do the following electronic resources regarding this particular educational institution relay digital story:
    http://strideacademy.org/
    https://www.facebook.com/StrideAcademy/
    https://twitter.com/search?q=Stride%20Academy%20Charter%20School&src=tyah
    https://youtu.be/eekIUqMQ4v0
    What do you like?
    What would you do differently?
  • Digital Storytelling for building, expanding, improving community relations – final thoughts

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literature:
Rossiter, M., & Garcia, P. A. (2010). Digital storytelling: A new player on the narrative field.
New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2010(126), 37-48.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.
com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d51532202%26
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Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodriguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantu, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal Of Research On Leadership Education, 6(5), 145-161.
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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

how to digital storytelling

An excellent example of practical approach to a real digital storytelling case:

https://plus.google.com/+GeorgeCohn/posts/XfaXtgp5amA

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

digital storytelling brainstorming


digital storytelling from writing

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Forget storytelling. ‘Hypertelling’ is the future, says Google Zoo founder

At C2 Montreal, Mike Yapp explains how technology is driving a narrative leap akin to the printed word

Read more at http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/forget-storytelling-hypertelling-future-says-google-zoo-founder/1396454#4sCKmcICYCQa13Lw.99

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Defining Digital Storytelling from digitalstorytelling

 

school leadership and digital storytelling

Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodríguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantú, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 6(5), 145–161. http://doi.org/10.1177/194277511100600504
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/literature.html#d
p. 149-150. Digital storytelling applies techniques that cross disciplines, fields, and subject matter. Digital storytelling pioneer Dana Atchley used the varied techniques such as case study, personal experience, introspection, life story, interviews, artifacts, cultural texts, observations, historical interaction, visual texts, and others (Lambert, 2002, 2006). Atchley’s techniques are firmly rooted in research methodology and collectively describe routine and problematic moments and meanings in individuals’ lives (Denzin & Lincoln, 2000; Lambert, 2006). Qualitative researchers often refer to this process as a bricolage, or the creation or construction from a variety of things. This bricolage helps Downloaded from jrl.sagepub.com at SAINT CLOUD STATE UNIV on June 8, 2016 Guajardo et. al./REFRAMING THE PRAXIS OF SCHOOL LEADERSHIP 150 to clarify our ontologies and inform epistemologies. Ladson-Billings (2000) explained epistemologies as more than the traditional way of knowing. Instead, epistemologies are a system of knowing that has both internal logic and external validity. The assortments of experiences used to inform our way of knowing then become the deliberate choices between hegemony and liberation. This process allows individuals to move beyond a traditional epistemological stance, or what Stanley (2007) has called the master narrative. Shujaa (1997) has called it a worldview epistemology that looks at knowledge as a symbiotic interaction of how we view the world, the knowledge we possess, and the knowledge we are capable of passing on to others.
p. 156 digital storytelling has been found to help organizations understand themselves (Militello & Guajardo, 2011). When organizations delve into introspective practices through the use of digital media, small and large organizations alike invite the opportunity to learn from deep, digital reflection.

digital storytelling

Stories are for sorting and storing
http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

> Willard,

>

> The post 29.126 has been niggling at me for days. I originally want to

> reply with a simple observation that the appeal to storytelling is

> cast in such a way to avoid the complications of narration’s relation

> to narrative (the telling and the told; shown and said). But it was

> the theme of “borrowing” from one domain by another that leads me to

> recall a counter-narrative where there is no need to borrow between

> domains since the military-industrial-entertainment complex is one entity.

>

> I contend that fundamental to human interaction is narration:

> attentiveness to how stories are related. Stories are for sorting and

> storing. *Sometimes this soothes paranoia induced by too much

> linearity.*

>

> A while ago (1996), I explored recursivity and narrativity. My

> starting point was the ability to ask questions (and learn from one’s

> bodily reactions). The musings may or may not have military relevance.

> Judge for

> yourselves:

>

> <quote>

>

> Pedagogical situations are sensory. They are also interpersonal.

> Because they are sensory this makes even learning by oneself interpersonal.

> Egocentric speech is like a dialogue between the senses. In

> Vygotsky’s and Luria’s experiments, children placed in problem-solving

> situations that were slightly too difficult for them displayed egocentric speech.

> One could consider these as self-induced metadiscursive moments. The

> self in crisis will disassociate and one’s questionning becomes the

> object of a question.

>

> Not only is the human self as a metabeing both fracturable and

> affiliable in itself, it is also prone to narrativity. That is, the

> human self will project its self-making onto the world in order to

> generate stories from sequences and to break stories into recombinant

> sequences. Its operations on signs are material practices with consequences for world-making.

>

> The fracturable affiliable self calls for reproductive models suitable

> to the interactions of multi-sensate beings, models that render dyads

> dialectical, questionable, answerable. Narrativity understood

> dialectically does not merely mean making sequences or strings of

> events into stories but also stories into things, strung together for

> more stories. From such an understanding, emerge non-dyadic

> narratives of reproduction, narratives where a thing-born transforms

> itself into an event, comes to understand itself as a process.

>

> </quote>

>

> http://homes.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance/S6D.HTM

>

> Funny to consider that those remarks were based in a consideration of

> language and feedback mechanisms. Make me think that the storytelling

> as “potent form of emotional cueing” may be directed to undesired

> responses such as greater self-reflexivity. And depending on how they

> are parsed, Hollywood films can contribute to undesired responses

> including escape. 🙂

>

> Francois Lachance, Scholar-at-large

> http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~lachance

>

> to think is often to sort, to store and to shuffle: humble, embodied

> tasks

>

> On Mon, 29 Jun 2015, Humanist Discussion Group wrote:

>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>> Sharon Ghamari-Tabrizi, in “The Convergence of the Pentagon and

>> Hollywood” (Memory Bytes: History, Technology, and Digital Culture, ed.

>> Rabinovitz and Geil, 2004), describes in some detail the adoption by

>> the U.S. military of the entertainment industry’s storytelling

>> techniques implemented by means of simulation. This chapter follows

>> on from her excellent “Simulating the Unthinkable: Gaming Future War

>> in the 1950s and 1960s”, Social Studies of Science 30.2 (2000). In

>> the 2004 piece she describes a U.S. National Research Council

>> workshop in October 1996 at which representatives from film, video

>> game, entertainment and theme-parks came together with those from the

>> Department of Defense, academia and the defense industries. There is

>> much about this convergence that we might productively take an

>> interest in. Let me, however, highlight storytelling in particular.

>>

>> In a military context, Ghamari-Tabrizi points out, skilled

>> storytelling techniques are used to help participants in a VR

>> environment sense that they are in a real environment and behave

>> accordingly. Storytelling functions as a potent form of emotional

>> cueing that would seem to elicit the desired responses. But

>> especially interesting, I think, is the fact that “many conference

>> participants argued that the preferred mode of experiential immersion

>> in electronic media is not the unframed chaos of hypertext, but

>> old-fashioned storytelling.” She quotes Alex Seiden of Industrial

>> Light and Magic (note the date — 1996): “I’ve never seen a CD-ROM

>> that moved me the way a powerful film has. I’ve never visited a Web

>> page with great emotional impact. I contend that linear narrative is

>> the fundamental art form of humankind: the novel, the play, the film… these are the forms that define our cultural experience.”

>>

>> Comments?

>>

>> Yours,

>> WM

>> —

>> Willard McCarty (http://www.mccarty.org.uk/), Professor, Department of

>> Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and Digital Humanities

>> Research Group, University of Western Sydney

Turning Technophobia through Digital Storytelling

http://www.nmc.org/blog/turning-technophobia-through-digital-storytelling/

 

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