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history programming languages

A Brief History of Computer Programming Languages [#Infographic]

Who contributed to the code that we use every day?

by Jimmy Daly APril 19, 2013

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2013/04/brief-history-computer-programming-languages-infographic

history of coding

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more on coding in this IMS bog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=coding

intro computer programming

Intro to Computer Programming
with Steve Perry

10-week eCourse  Beginning Tuesday, September 5, 2017

For today’s librarian, the ability to adapt to new technology is not optional. Programming—the process of using computer language to generate commands that instruct a computer to perform specific functions—is at the core of all computer technology. A foundation in programming helps you understand the inner workings of all of the technologies that drive libraries now—from integrated library systems to Web pages and databases.

In this Advanced eCourse, you can go from having little to no programming knowledge to being familiar with coding in several different computer languages. Steve Perry—an experienced LIS instructor and programmer—will teach you in his lectures what you need to get started, and then the readings and exercises will give you practical programming experience, particularly as it relates to a library environment. Languages covered will include HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, and others. You do not need any programming experience or special software to participate in this eCourse.

Participants who complete this Advanced eCourse will receive an SJSU iSchool/ALA Publishing Advanced Certificate of Completion.

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more on coding in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=coding

Visualisation and Gamification of e-Learning and Programming Education

Visualisation and Gamification of e-Learning and Programming Education

Read full-text

Electronic Journal of e-Learning Article · January 2016
Marie Olsson, Peter Mozelius, Jonas Collin

This paper presents and discusses visualisation as a channel to improve learner’s control and understanding of programming concepts and gamification as a way to increase study motivation in virtual learning environments. Data has been collected by evaluation questionnaires and group discussions in two courses partly given in the Moodle virtual learning environment. One course is on Game based learning for Bachelor’s programmes, the other is a course on e-learning for university teachers. Both the courses have used progress bars to visualise students’ study paths and digital badges for gamification.

Finland Eyes Programming Classes for Elementary School Students

http://mashable.com/2013/11/16/finland-tech-education-schools/?utm_cid=mash-prod-email-topstories&utm_emailalert=daily&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily

Finland Eyes Programming Classes for Elementary School Students

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Beyond Mindcraft: Games That Inspire Building and Exploration

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/11/beyond-minecraft-games-that-inspire-building-and-exploration/

1. Garry’s Mod 

garryscreenshotGarry’s Mod (GMod) is a sandbox game like Minecraft but instead of building and exploring, students use a fun physics engine that simulates things like gravity and mass. They also use a virtual toy box of assets from Valve Software’s popular games. The tool is a step up in complexity from the elegant simplicity of Minecraft, but with Garry’s Mod,students are exposed to physics concepts while having madcap fun.

2. Kerbal Space Program

kerbal_screenshotKerbal Space Program has a robust physics engine too, but it’s more focused than Garry’s Mod. Players purchase rocket parts, put them together, and then see if they can get a ship into orbit, to one of two moons, or even to another planet. These aren’t easy tasks, so play is focused on trial and error testing, and, like Minecraft, seeking help from the community is part of a successful strategy.

3. Sound Shapes 

soundshapes_screenshotSound Shapes is a visually stunning platform puzzle game set to a rich musical soundscape. Even better: students can create and share their own levels – like interactive sheet music — using sounds and objects unlocked by playing the platform game. It’s an accessible entry point into musical composition as well as game design, and provides an experience that builds on the creativity of Minecraft while offering something wholly unique for music lovers.

4. DIY

DIYFor creative kids who want to get their hands dirty, check out DIY, a site where students can find things to build, instructions for how to build them, and ways to share their creations with others. All projects are aligned to 50 skills that run the gamut from outdoors to indoors, and feature various challenges to complete and cool badges to earn and display.

5. STENYCIL

screen568x568Computer programming is a great next step for students who love to mod Minecraft or toy around with the redstone resource (which simulates basic logic and circuitry). One solid entry-level tool is Stencyl, a game creation program focused on codeless, cross-platform game making. By snapping blocks of code together, students can create games that can be published and played on a variety of platforms including mobile phones.

6. CODECADEMY

Screen Shot 2013-11-18 at 3.31.05 PMCodecademy is a web-based, self-paced site that teaches actual industry-standard languages like PHP, Javascript, Python, Ruby, HTML, and CSS. While students don’t create publishable games like they would in Stencyl, their learning is purpose-driven and contextualized, e.g. JavaScript for web development or Ruby for app development. And students do get to see their code’s output directly onscreen.

Minecraft has introduced a lot of youth to games as well as the critical thinking, problem solving, and creation skills necessary for self-motivated learning. The games and sites on this list have the potential to extend that learning, providing fresh outlets for self-expression in the digital world and beyond.

Python as the programming language at SCSU

 

From: scsu-announce-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu [mailto:scsu-announce-bounces@lists.stcloudstate.edu] On Behalf Of Rysavy, Sr. Del Marie
Sent: Tuesday, November 12, 2013 12:50 PM
To: scsu-announce@stcloudstate.edu
Subject: [SCSU-announce] course in programming for beginners

Our beginning programming course, CNA 267, is now using Python as the programming language.  Students learn to work with decision and loop control structures, variables, lists (arrays) and procedures, etc.  Python is becoming one of the most widely-accepted languages for business professionals and scientists.
Please inform your students (who need to learn programming) of this course.  It is being offered during spring semester, as well as next fall.

Sr. Del Marie Rysavy

ECC 254

CSIT Department

telephone: 308-4929

Technology Instruction Week March 4 – March 8: Coding and Programming

Technology Instruction Week: Hybrid and Distributive Learning
March 4 – March 8 MC 205 | 1:00pm – 2:00pm Monday
  • Monday
    Basics of Visual Basic
  • Tuesday
    Basics of Cascading Style Sheets
  • Wednesday
    Basics of mobile apps programming
  • Thursday
    Basics of Java Script
  • Friday
    Basics of HTML

Register for the 1:00pm session at (not required): http://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/help/training/

Follow us on Twitter: @SCSUtechInstruc | #techworkshop
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims

Non-Traditional Badge Development

Managing Relationships with Partners in Non-Traditional Badge Development

Live Webcast: October 28, 2019 | 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Eastern
Webcast Recording: Available 10 business days after the Live Webcast

$450.00

Non-traditional badges represent a growing market full of opportunity. However, you may not be pursuing badges of this type, because you’re not sure how to work with industry partners in development and management. Don’t let that stop you!

Join us for this webcast to learn tips on how to engage with industry partners for non-traditional badge development. We will profile a typical relationship with industry partners and share common pitfalls to avoid.

Michael P. Macklin

Associate Provost for Workforce Partnerships/Development, Colorado Community College System

Michael’s primary focuses are workforce development, noncredit programming, and business partnership development. Through Mr. Macklin’s work with digital badges, he is leveraging the power of digital credential opportunities in advanced manufacturing, healthcare and information technology. He understands that digital badges are key in sustaining and expanding workforce skillsets with community and business partners as this allows for unprecedented access to affordable reskilling and upskilling opportunities. Read Michael’s full bio here.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badge

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