Archive of ‘social media’ category

Stacks CMS for libraries

EBSCO Launches Content Management System for Libraries

By Leila Meyer 09/26/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/09/26/ebsco-debuts-content-management-system-for-libraries.aspx

EBSCO Information Services has debuted Stacks, a hosted content management system for libraries, and Stacks Mobile, a native app for iOS and Android devices.

Social media integration, including Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn;

++++++++++++++++

more on technology in libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=library

ALA resources for social media in libraries

Social media basics: Engaging your library users

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/10/social-media-basics-engaging-your-library-users

Managing Traditional & Social Media for Libraries

http://www.ala.org/pla/onlinelearning/webinars/archive/media

Use of Social Media in the Library

http://www.ala.org/alcts/confevents/upcoming/webinar/121014

Social media has the potential to facilitate much closer relationships between libraries and their patrons. Current usage of social media by the library community generally remains ad hoc and somewhat experimental, but the uptake of these tools is accelerating, and they will likely play an increasingly important role in library service provision and outreach in the future. Taylor & Francis has produced a white paper that analyzes current practices relating social media’s use in the library and how this differs by librarian job role. The sample was taken from academic librarians around the world, which also allows us to examine differences by geographic location. The goal: to establish how librarians are currently using social media in their roles, the most useful social media tools and best applications for these tools in a library setting.

bit.ly/LibrarySM
http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf
http://downloads.alcts.ala.org/ce/141012socialmedialibrary_Slides.pdf

Academic Libraries

http://www.ala.org/news/state-americas-libraries-report-2014/academic-libraries

Learn to plan and strategize for ‘A More Effective Social Media Presence’ in new workshop

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/08/learn-plan-and-strategize-more-effective-social-media-presence-new-workshop

Using social media to find collaboration, coordination and focus

http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2012/11/using-social-media-find-collaboration-coordination-and-focus promotes http://store.elsevier.com/Managing-Social-Media-in-Libraries/Troy-Swanson/isbn-9781780633770/

Rethinking social media to organize information and communities, popular eCourse returns!

http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2016/02/rethinking-social-media-organize-information-and-communities-popular-ecourse

explores a variety of social media tools in terms of how they can be used to organize information and communities. Together, you will survey and use a variety of social media tools, such as Delicious, Diigo, Facebook, Goodreads, Google Hangouts, LibraryThing, Pinterest, Storify, Twitter, and more! You will also explore how social media tools can be used to organize and disseminate information and how they can be used to foster and sustain communities of learning.

Web_Analytics_Part1–Turning_Numbers_Into_Action–1-20-2011 from Paul Signorelli

In age of Social Media U.S. libraries encourage users to choose privacy

http://www.ala.org/news/news/pressreleases2010/april2010/privacy_pio

User-Generated Content in Library Discovery Systems

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/user-generated-content-library-discovery-systems

With the widespread use of library technology that incorporates social media components, intelligent objects, and knowledge-sharing tools comes the ability of libraries to provide greater opportunities for patron engagement in those discovery systems through user-generated content.  These features may include the ability of users to contribute commentary such as reviews, simple point-and-click rating systems (e.g. one star to five stars), or to engage in extensive discussions or other social interactions. This kind of content could transform authoritative files, alter information architecture, and change the flow of information within the library discovery system.

Privacy Shifting

http://www.ala.org/transforminglibraries/future/trends/privacy

Across generations, concerns for privacy may dissipate with time as specific technologies take hold or as people become aware of a technology’s benefits and value those over their value for privacy.

Library Privacy Guidelines for Students in K-12 Schools

http://www.ala.org/advocacy/library-privacy-guidelines-students-k-12-schools

my note: excellent blueprint for similar activities / policies at higher ed.

Twitter Social Media Analytics

#1: Adjust Your Content Mix

On Facebook, go to Insights > Posts > Post Types to review the engagement by the type of content you posted (post, link, image, video). On Twitter, you can see a snapshot of each post you’ve made by going to Settings > Analytics > Tweets.

#2: Fine-tune Your Posting Schedule

On Facebook, go to Insights > Posts > When Your Fans Are Online. For Twitter, you can use a tool such a Tweriod to find out when the bulk of your followers are online.

#3: Inform Your Messaging

On Facebook, open the Ads Manager and go to Audience Insights. On Twitter, you can check your audience data by going to Settings > Twitter Ads > Analytics > Audience Insights.

#4: Boost Your Engagement

On Twitter, go to Settings > Analytics > Tweets and take a look at which post topics get the most engagement. On Facebook, go to Insights > Posts > Post Types and then switch the engagement metrics in Facebook to show reactions, comments, and shares for each post rather than post clicks or general engagement.

+++++++++++++++

more on social media analytics in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+analytics

strategic planing social media libraries

A More Effective Social Media Presence: Strategic Planning and Project Management from ALATechSource

Strategic Planning for Social Media in Libraries (2012)

Sarah K. Steiner

https://books.google.com/books/about/Strategic_Planning_for_Social_Media_in_L.html

http://www.alastore.ala.org/pdf/steiner_ch1.pdf

p. 1 definition of social media for libraries
six primarytypes exist: “collaborative projects, blogs, content communities, social networking sites,” and two types of virtual worlds: “virtual game worlds, which ask users to follow the rules of the game, and virtual social worlds, wherein users can behave without rules in almost any way they like” (Kaplan and Haenlein, 2010: 59)
it is not that I disagree with such definition, but i wish there was a “door” mentioning “flexibility” and “necessity to reassess” what social media is every year, 3 year, 5 years

p. 2 definition what is strategic planning

  • identify the needs of your target audiences,
  • identify the ways in which you can meet those needs, and
  • identify ways to respond confidently and proactively to changesin those needs.
  1. Where the organization is
  2. Where the organization should go
  3. How the organization can get there (McNamara, 2011)

It must be:

  1. Flexible
  2. Based on data
  3. Maintainable
  4. Regularly cared for

covers and confirms my notes to the SCSU library use of its social media:

p. 83 ask uncomfortable questions
in planning, we must be prepared to ask, critically consider and answer questions that make us uncomfortable (not only that I was not let to ask questions, I was ousted from any body that was making decisions regarding social media. I was openly opposed and rebuked for asking why 3 reference librarians will keep the passwords to the account for the library SM)

p. 83 Communicate
If your team communicates honestly and thoroughly, then positive feelings and advocates for your social media endeavors will grow. In the span of 6 months, I had to ask three times where are the notes of the social media committee kept and eventually i will receive an answer, which in it nebulous and apologetic form was practically not an answer.

p. 83 Don’t rush to conclusions
Satisficing often works, but it can also lead to conclusions that are less then optimal.
In the fall of 2013, I had to fight an overwhelming majority opposing my proposal that social media needs to include student representation, since SM is about dialog, not broadcasting (see page 86) and the current staff and faculty see SM as another form of broadcasting. In the span of six months, by the summer of 2014 library staff and faculty had fallen in the other extreme, letting one single student run all library SM. That student did/could not have understanding of the scope and goals of the library resulting in satisficing.

p. 84 aim for consensus, but don’t require it
Consensus was the leitmotiv of the dean; it failed in general, and it failed in SM. 

p. 84  get an external reviewer

p. 84 value and celebrate small success
a strategic plan will be realized through a series of small actions, not one or two pivotal plots.

p. 84 create accountability

p. 86 maintain a consistent tone and brand
visual and tone based consistency.
This library DOES maintain consistency by posting Instagram pictures of people covering their faces with books, so part of their face compliments a face on cover of books. It is done by other libraries and it would have been cute and original if not overdone. If the SM activities of a library consist mostly of such activities then the “branding” part definitely is hurt. Yet, the faculty in this library vehemently adhere to “let’s see what other libraries are doing,” but does not understand that it needs further conceptualizing to figure out how to transform into “brand.”

p. 86 capitalize on the strengths of social media
“in many cases, business and libraries use SM exactly as they use their websites: to push content.
This has been the main criticism from the start: the three reference librarians holding the passwords to the SM account were using Facebook as a announcement board and kept dormant the other accounts. The resolution of the library faculty who was called to arbitrate the argument with these three librarian: “I don’t understand very well Facebook.” The interim dean, who, subsequently had to resolve this dispute: “I don’t use Facebook.”

p. 87 Metrics

Analyze and tweak plan
measuring success is about maximizing time and efforts, not about laying blame for shortcomings or failures.
this applies to daily tasks and responsibilities and shuffling time, but when the organization does not have a clear overarching goal and clear strategy how to achieve it, then issues must be raised up. which leads to:

p. 92 Plan for conversation
the inclusion of conversation. incorporate your patrons as primary content creators (not appointing just a single student worker to broadcast)

p. 92 use SM as an assessment or feedback tool

p. 93 plan to monitor your brand
if you decide to start watching these types of mentions, you’ll want to consider whether you’ll adopt a passive or an active role in responding to them.

review:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1941126X.2012.732867

+++++++++++++++++++++++++

Social media strategy 2013-2014
National Library Australia

https://www.nla.gov.au/policy-and-planning/social-media-strategy-2013

——————————–

10 Social Media Marketing Tips for Libraries,Ellyssa KroskiFebruary 12, 2013

http://oedb.org/ilibrarian/10-social-media-marketing-tips-for-libraries/

————————————–

Social Media: Libraries Are Posting, but Is Anyone Listening?By on May 7, 2013

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/05/marketing/social-media-libraries-are-posting-but-is-anyone-listening/

————————————–

Strategic Planning for Social Media in Libraries: The Case of Zimbabwe

http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/strategic-planning-for-social-media-in-libraries/127826

Quality Videos Quickly

By

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/video-production-how-to-create-quality-videos-quickly-roberto-blake/

https://www.youtube.com/c/robertoblakepsd

Adobe Premiere Pro CC : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxkXrPzEGtI

Whether you’re using a smartphone or a DSLR camera, one thing Roberto recommends before recording is to check the environment. Look for and remove any distractions from the background. For example, if there’s noise from cars driving by you can change your location. If there’s a part of your office that needs to be cleaned, you can tidy up.

He also says you should think about the context of your background. For instance, when Roberto does personal vlogs as motivation for creatives and entrepreneurs who might be thinking about giving up, he uses his bookshelf as the backdrop. It’s appropriate because there is literally a collection of people behind him who put something out there and could have quit just as easily.

Roberto also notes you should consider audio, the lighting in the room, and take a photo of the shot, to check framing and composition, before you film. The photo gives you a way to make sure the video will be shot at the angle you want. Roberto shares that if he’s filming with his camera, he’ll use the remote or a timer to take a photo of him in the shot. With a smartphone, he says you can use a selfie stick, or tripod, or the timer feature.

Smartphone teleprompter apps include PromptSmart on iTunes and Teleprompter Pro on iTunes and Google Play.

Most of the smartphone apps are free or $5.

Adobe Premiere Clip, which is simple to use. All you need is a free Adobe account, which you can sign up for via email. It can upload video directly to YouTube and Facebook for you. It also has color grading filters, lets you loop background audio (they have a few tracks which are royalty free), mix down the audio, edit clips together, cut things out, and more.

Plus, if you have professional software, like Adobe Premiere Pro at home, you can do a rough cut of everything in Premiere Clip from your phone, and then save it to Creative Cloud, go back to your desktop, and then tweak and do all the advanced editing there.

If you have an iPhone, you have iMovie. There’s also FilmoraGo (iPhone and Android) and CyberLink Power Director, which is Android only.

Free video editing programs such as HitFilm 4, DaVinci Resolve, iMovie, and the Windows MovieMaker

Prisma, available on iOS and Android, takes your images, whether you take the photos in the app or import them, and applies artistic filters.

++++++++++++++
more on video editing in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=video+editing

Snapchat vs. Instagram

++++++++++++++

more on Snapchat in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=snapchat

more on Instagram in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instagram

surveying social media use on campus

Montana State University Library Social Media Survey: http://www.lib.montana.edu/social-media-survey/

A Survey of K-12 Educators on Social Networking and Content

http://www.edweb.net/fimages/op/K12Survey.pdf

SEAL Canada; https://www.cais.ca/uploaded/Professional_Development/socialmediasurveydraft3.pdf

————————–

Reach of leading social media and networking sites used by teenagers and young adults in the United States as of February 2016

http://www.statista.com/statistics/199242/social-media-and-networking-sites-used-by-us-teenagers/

Study Finds 77% of College Students Use Snapchat Daily, Feb 24, 2014: http://mashable.com/2014/02/24/snapchat-study-college-students/#HMZ348OWhGqJ

Student Panel Survey: Social Media Executive Summary

posted on

https://www.nacs.org/research/insightsintostudentbehavior/tabid/4856/ArticleID/374/Student-Panel-Survey-Social-Media-Executive-Summary.aspx

The Evolution of Social Media Use Among College Students

Feb 19 2014
March 2, 2016 By Carl Straumsheim

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2016/03/02/study-explores-impact-social-media-texting-email-use

While some faculty members are hesitant to contact students on whichever social media platform is in vogue, others have explored texting as an alternative to email.

The paper, which is being presented at next month’s Information and Telecommunications Education and Research Association conference, also recommends colleges should consider using texting and social media platforms to reach students. However, the findings still suggest email can be an effective method of communication.

How Millennials use and control social media, Published

———————-

Social Media Usage Trends Among Higher Education Faculty ;
2011-social-media-report
—————-

K-12 Teachers in America Remain Reluctant to Integrate Social Media in the Classroom, Finds University of Phoenix Teacher Survey http://www.phoenix.edu/news/releases/2016/08/k-12-teachers-remain-reluctant-social-media.html

 

Zygmunt Bauman Social media are a trap

Zygmunt Bauman: “Social media are a trap.”The Polish-born sociologist is skeptical about the possibilities for political change

Since developing his theory of liquid modernity in the late 1990s – which describes our age as one in which “all agreements are temporary, fleeting, and valid only until further notice” – he has become a leading figure in the field of sociology.
Q. You are skeptical of the way people protest through social media, of so-called “armchair activism,” and say that the internet is dumbing us down with cheap entertainment. So would you say that the social networks are the new opium of the people?
A. The question of identity has changed from being something you are born with to a task: you have to create your own community. But communities aren’t created, and you either have one or you don’t. What the social networks can create is a substitute. The difference between a community and a network is that you belong to a community, but a network belongs to you. You feel in control. You can add friends if you wish, you can delete them if you wish. You are in control of the important people to whom you relate. People feel a little better as a result, because loneliness, abandonment, is the great fear in our individualist age. But it’s so easy to add or remove friends on the internet that people fail to learn the real social skills, which you need when you go to the street, when you go to your workplace, where you find lots of people who you need to enter into sensible interaction with. Pope Francis, who is a great man, gave his first interview after being elected to Eugenio Scalfari, an Italian journalist who is also a self-proclaimed atheist. It was a sign: real dialogue isn’t about talking to people who believe the same things as you. Social media don’t teach us to dialogue because it is so easy to avoid controversy… But most people use social media not to unite, not to open their horizons wider, but on the contrary, to cut themselves a comfort zone where the only sounds they hear are the echoes of their own voice, where the only things they see are the reflections of their own face. Social media are very useful, they provide pleasure, but they are a trap.

social media and democracy

The biggest threat to democracy? Your social media feed

Vyacheslav PolonskiNetwork Scientist, Oxford Internet Institute
Yochai Benkler explains: “The various formats of the networked public sphere provide anyone with an outlet to speak, to inquire, to investigate, without need to access the resources of a major media organization.”
Democratic bodies are typically elected in periods of three to five years, yet citizen opinions seem to fluctuate daily and sometimes these mood swings grow to enormous proportions. When thousands of people all start tweeting about the same subject on the same day, you know that something is up. With so much dynamic and salient political diversity in the electorate, how can policy-makers ever reach a consensus that could satisfy everyone?
At the same time, it would be a grave mistake to discount the voices of the internet as something that has no connection to real political situations.
What happened in the UK was not only a political disaster, but also a vivid example of what happens when you combine the uncontrollable power of the internet with a lingering visceral feeling that ordinary people have lost control of the politics that shape their lives.

social media and democracy

Polarization as a driver of populism

People who have long entertained right-wing populist ideas, but were never confident enough to voice them openly, are now in a position to connect to like-minded others online and use the internet as a megaphone for their opinions.

The resulting echo chambers tend to amplify and reinforce our existing opinions, which is dysfunctional for a healthy democratic discourse. And while social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter generally have the power to expose us to politically diverse opinions, research suggests that the filter bubbles they sometimes create are, in fact, exacerbated by the platforms’ personalization algorithms, which are based on our social networks and our previously expressed ideas. This means that instead of creating an ideal type of a digitally mediated “public agora”, which would allow citizens to voice their concerns and share their hopes, the internet has actually increased conflict and ideological segregation between opposing views, granting a disproportionate amount of clout to the most extreme opinions.

The disintegration of the general will

In political philosophy, the very idea of democracy is based on the principal of the general will, which was proposed by Jean-Jacques Rousseau in the 18th century. Rousseau envisioned that a society needs to be governed by a democratic body that acts according to the imperative will of the people as a whole.

There can be no doubt that a new form of digitally mediated politics is a crucial component of the Fourth Industrial Revolution: the internet is already used for bottom-up agenda-setting, empowering citizens to speak up in a networked public sphere, and pushing the boundaries of the size, sophistication and scope of collective action. In particular, social media has changed the nature of political campaigning and will continue to play an important role in future elections and political campaigns around the world.

++++++++++++++

more on the impact of technology on democracy in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=democracy

 

1 2 3 30