Archive of ‘social media’ category

social media for good

9 ways real students use social media for good

Michael Niehoff  October 2, 2019

https://www.iste.org/explore/Digital-citizenship/9-ways-real-students-use-social-media-for-good

1.  Sharing tools and resources.

2.  Gathering survey data.

3. Collaborating with peers.

4. Participating in group work.

5. Communicating with teachers.

6. Researching careers.

7. Meeting with mentors and experts.

8. Showcasing student work.  

9. Creating digital portfolios.

+++++++++++++
more about social media in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

digitally native need computer help

The Smartphone Generation Needs Computer Help

Young people may be expert social-media and smartphone users, but many lack the digital skills they need for today’s jobs. How can we set them up for success?

https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/grow-google-2019/smartphone-generation-computer-help/3127/

Kenneth Cole’s classroom at the Boys & Girls Club of Dane County, located on a quiet residential street in Madison, Wisconsin.

The classes Cole teaches use Grow with Google’s Applied Digital Skills online curriculum.

One day he may lead Club members in a lesson on building digital resumes that can be customized quickly and make job-seeking easier when applying online. Another day they may create a blog. On this particular day, they drew up a budget for an upcoming event using a spreadsheet. For kids who are often glued to their smartphones, these types of digital tasks, surprisingly, can be new experiences.

The vast majority of young Americans have access to a smartphone, and nearly half say they are online “almost constantly.”

But although smartphones can be powerful learning tools when applied productively, these reports of hyperconnectivity and technological proficiency mask a deeper paucity of digital skills. This often-overlooked phenomenon is limiting some young people’s ability—particularly those in rural and low-income communities—to succeed in school and the workplace, where digital skills are increasingly required to collaborate effectively and complete everyday tasks.

According to a survey by Pew Research Center, only 17 percent of Americans are “digitally ready”—that is, confident using digital tools for learning. Meanwhile, in a separate study, American millennials ranked last among a group of their international peers when it came to “problem-solving in technology-rich environments,” such as sending and saving digital information

teach his sophomore pupils the technology skills they need in the workplace, as well as soft skills like teamwork.

+++++++++++++++++++++
more on digitally native in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitally+native
more on millennials in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=millennials

Instagram AI and cyberbullying

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/03/766507832/instagram-now-lets-you-control-your-bullys-comments

Instagram announced a new anti-bullying feature called Restrict.

Fifty-nine percent of American teens have been bullied or harassed online, according to a 2018 survey by the Pew Research Center. Instagram is one of the most popular social media networks among teenagers and a likely place for teens to be bullied.

In a recent study, conducted by the investment bank Piper Jaffray, Instagram is the second most popular social media platform among teenagers. Thirty-five percent of teens surveyed said that Instagram is their favorite social media platform, compared with 41% who preferred Snapchat.

++++++++++++
more on cyberbullying in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cyberbullying

Endgame for LinkedIn

The Endgame for LinkedIn Is Coming

https://medium.com/@lancengym/the-endgame-for-linkedin-is-coming-31d4a8b2a76

LinkedIn had — and still has — multiple branded apps: Job Search, SlideShare, Learning, Recruiter, Sales Navigator and something call ‘Elevate”, which purports to “build your reputation by sharing smart content”. A news and publishing app called Pulse was integrated into the main app in May 2017.

The idea of selling relevant services to your user base is good, but not if you can’t do it well.

LinkedIn’s employees were actually using G suite — the whole bag: Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Hangouts, Docs, Sheets… — before the Microsoft acquisition.

+++++++++++
more on LInkedIn in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=linkedin

high trust vs low trust societies

https://twitter.com/math_rachel/status/1175895568385658880

App Gap

Higher Ed Needs to Bridge the ‘App Gap’ to Reach Students

By Gordon Freedman     Nov 29, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-11-29-higher-ed-needs-to-bridge-the-app-gap-to-reach-students

Millennials (born between 1981 and 1996) or Gen Z (born after 1996)

Today’s youth culture lives in apps—not for the sake of the technology itself, but for the rich social, psychological identity-driven mash-up that define a person, group, interactions and opinions.

When a Millennial or Gen Z-er accesses a new consumer app, it is as simple as opening the morning newspaper is for their parents or grandparents. However, when the same people look at a college schedule, fill out paperwork or an online form, access or save records that they may need later, and, eventually, try to conjure it all at the end of this process, they are stopped in their tracks.

Building a Brand, User Testing Apps, Social Media Marketing

By contrast, when brands and memes compete on social media, young people pay attention.

Without those social signals as well as continual feedback from their friends and influencers— what the younger generations rely on for context—they are likely on very different wavelengths from the colleges who want them to attend and stay, training and outreach opportunities vying for their attention, and employers who need reliable entry hires.

Each generational shift suffers a cultural communication schism, noticeable at home and in school, that in the past was navigable by the time young people focused on college or career training, or entered the workforce. Today, this is not happening.

The gap between the traditional practices and the social and consumer app world is serious. Simply creating app-like technology to mimic older processes is not the answer.

Equity is more than creating more organizational programs or developing more ineffective websites without adequate measures for engaging and empowering young people who need support.

illusory truth effect

When False Claims Are Repeated, We Start To Believe They Are True

When False Claims Are Repeated, We Start To Believe They Are True — Here’s How Behaving Like A Fact-Checker Can Help

September 12, 2019

This phenomenon, known as the “illusory truth effect”, is exploited by politicians and advertisers — and if you think you are immune to it, you’re probably wrong. In fact, earlier this year we reported on a study that found people are prone to the effect regardless of their particular cognitive profile.

study in Cognition has found that using our own knowledge to fact-check a false claim can prevent us from believing it is true when it is later repeated. But we might need a bit of a nudge to get there.

The researchers found that participants who had focussed on how interesting the statements were in the first part of the study showed the illusory truth effect

++++++++++++++
more on Fake News in this IMS blog

Fake Video Audio and the Election

https://www.npr.org/2019/09/02/754415386/what-you-need-to-know-about-fake-video-audio-and-the-2020-election

deep fake: definition

What are “deepfakes?”

That’s the nickname given to computer-created artificial videos or other digital material in which images are combined to create new footage that depicts events that never actually happened. The term originates from the online message board Reddit.

One initial use of the fake videos was in amateur-created pornography, in which the faces of famous Hollywood actresses were digitally placed onto that of other performers to make it appear as though the stars themselves were performing.

How difficult is it to create fake media?

It can be done with specialized software, experts say, the same way that editing programs such as Photoshop have made it simpler to manipulate still images. And specialized software itself isn’t necessary for what have been dubbed “shallow fakes” or “cheap fakes.”

Researchers also say they are working on new ways to speed up systems aimed at helping establish when video or audio has been manipulated. But it’s been called a “cat and mouse” game in which there may seldom be exact parity between fabrication and detection.

At least one state has considered legislation that would outlaw distributing election-oriented fake videos.

+++++++++++
more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=fake+news

1 2 3 50