Archive of ‘Library and information science’ category

digital innovation liberal arts

The Secret to Digital Innovation in the Liberal Arts

Small liberal arts colleges looking to innovate with technology in education are finding strength in numbers.

By David Raths 12/12/16

https://campustechnology.com/Articles/2016/12/12/The-Secret-to-Digital-Innovation-in-the-Liberal-Arts.aspx

During a Dec. 8 Future Trends Forum video chat hosted by futurist Bryan Alexander, several liberal arts technology leaders spoke about their efforts to define their colleges’ approach to digital innovation.

As an example of a more promising liberal arts partnership, Eshleman pointed to LACOL, the Liberal Arts Consortium for Online Learning. LACOL’s nine member institutions comprise Amherst, Bryn Mawr, Carleton, Haverford, Pomona, Swarthmore, Vassar, Washington and Lee and Williams. LACOL is an effort to create an experimental framework that supports project work across the nine campuses. There are interesting experiments happening on each campus, and LACOL provides opportunities to use a digital network to take those to a new level, said Elizabeth Evans, LACOL’s director, who joined Eshleman on the Future Trends Forum virtual stage to describe the consortium’s setup.

This involves a multi-campus team of faculty and instructional designers, all organized around a central project, which has its ups and downs, she added.

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She is starting to work with Davidson’s Center for Interdisciplinary Studies and an entrepreneurship initiative to foster projects that are “bottom-up from students, faculty and staff who want to experiment with models of innovation.”

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She said she has learned to keep the focus off of technology initially. She asks faculty members to think about what have they wanted to do around student learning and why. “It is about that first, and technology second,” she stressed, adding that she has moved away from quantitative evaluation of projects and more toward storytelling.

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more on digital innovation in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+innovation

social media clean up

How to Start Fresh Again on Social Media

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http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

ECIL

5th European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL2017).

http://ecil2017.ilconf.org
http://www.facebook.com/ecil2017

Topics of the Conference include (but not limited with) the following:

  • Information literacy in the workplace
  • Information literacy and employability
  • Information literacy and workforce development
  • Information literacy and career readiness
  • Information literacy and developing critical and creative workers
  • Information literacy and 21st century workplace
  • Information usage in the workplace
  • Information literacy and organisational success
  • Information literacy and competitiveness
  • Critical perspectives on workplace information literacy
  • Information literacy and the neoliberal agenda
  • Information literacy and digital empowerment
  • Information literacy and trans/inter/multiculturalism
  • Information literacy and community engagement
  • Information literacy and social change
  • Information literacy and democracy, citizenship, active participation
  • Information literacy, libraries, the public sphere
  • Information literacy and lifelong learning
  • Information literacy in theoretical context (models, standards, indicators)
  • literacy, visual literacy, health literacy, multi literacy)civic literacy, transliteracy, metaliteracy, e-literacy, digital literacy, computer literacy, scientific iteracy, lInformation literacy and related concepts (transversal competencies, media literacy, data
  • Information literacy research (research strategies, methodology and methods)
  • Information seeking and information behavior
  • Information literacy good practices
  • Information literacy policies and policy development
  • Information literacy and libraries Information literacy and LIS education
  • Information literacy and knowledge management
  • Information literacy across disciplines
  • Information literacy in different cultures and countries
  • Information literacy in different contexts (law, health, etc.)
  • Information literacy and education
  • Information literacy education in different sectors (K-12, higher education, vocational education)
  • Information literacy instruction
  • Information literacy for different groups (adults, children, young people, disadvantaged groups)
  • Information literacy and ethical/social issues
  • Information literacy and emerging technologies

Information literacy in the future

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More on info literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=information+literacy

interactive historical map

Chronas – Interactive Historical Map and Data Sets

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2015/12/chronas-interactive-history-map-and.html

http://chronas.org/history

My note: it is not about history ONLY, it is about gamifying your lesson plan.

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more on history in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history
more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling
more on gamification in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

social media and altmetrics

Sugimoto, C. R., Work, S., Larivière, V., & Haustein, S. (2016). Scholarly use of social media and altmetrics: a review of the literature. Retrieved from https://arxiv.org/abs/1608.08112
https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1608/1608.08112.pdf
One of the central issues associated with altmetrics (short for alternative metrics) is the identification of communities engaging with scholarly content on social media (Haustein, Bowman, & Costas, 2015; Neylon, 2014; Tsou, Bowman, Ghazinejad, & Sugimoto, 2015) . It is thus of central importance to understand the uses and users of social media in the context of scholarly communication.
most identify the following major categori es: social networking, social bookmarking, blogging, microblogging, wikis , and media and data sharing (Gu & Widén -Wulff, 2011; Rowlands, Nicholas, Russell, Canty, & Watkinson, 2011; Tenopir et al., 2013) . Some also conside r conferencing, collaborative authoring, scheduling and meeting tools (Rowlands et al., 2011) or RSS and online documents (Gu & Widén -Wulff, 2011; Tenopir et al., 2013) as social media. The landscape of social media, as well as that of altmetrics, is constantly changing and boundaries with othe r online platforms and traditional metrics are fuzzy. Many online platforms cannot be easily classified and more traditional metrics , such as downloads and mentions in policy documents , have been referred to as altmetrics due to data pr ovider policies.
the Use of social media platforms for by researchers is high — ranging from 75 to 80% in large -scale surveys (Rowlands et al., 2011; Tenopir et al., 2013; Van Eperen & Marincola, 2011) .
but
less than 10% of scholars reported using Twitter (Rowlands et al., 2011) , while 46% used ResearchGate (Van Noorden, 2014) , and more than 55% use d YouTube (Tenopir et al., 2013) —it is necessary to discuss the use of various types of social media separately . Furthermore, there i s a distinction among types of us e, with studies showing higher uses of social media for dissemination, consumption, communication , and promotion (e.g., Arcila -Calderón, Piñuel -Raigada, & Calderín -Cruz, 2013; Van Noorden, 2014) , and fewer instances of use for creation (i.e., using social media to construct scholarship) (British Library et al., 2012; Carpenter, Wetheridge, Tanner, & Smith, 2012; Procter et al., 2010b; Tenopir et al., 2013) .
Frequently mentioned social platforms in scholarly communication research include research -specific tools such as Mendeley, Zotero, CiteULike, BibSonomy, and Connotea (now defunct) as well as general tools such as Delicious and Digg (Hammond, Hannay, Lund, & Scott, 2005; Hull, Pettifer, & Kell, 2008; Priem & Hemminger, 2010; Reher & Haustein, 2010) .
Social data sharing platforms provide an infrastructure to share various types of scholarly objects —including datasets, software code, figures, presentation slides and videos —and for users to interact with these objects (e.g., comment on, favorite, like , and reuse ). Platforms such as Figshare and SlideShare disseminate scholars’ various types of research outputs such as datasets, figures, infographics, documents, videos, posters , or presentation slides (Enis, 2013) and displays views, likes, and shares by other users (Mas -Bleda et al., 2014) . GitHub provides for uploading and stor ing of software code, which allows users to modify and expand existing code (Dabbish, Stuart, Tsay, & Herbsleb, 2012) , which has been shown to lead to enhanced collaboratio n among developers (Thung, Bissyande, Lo, & Jiang, 2013) . As w ith other social data sharing platforms, usage statistics on the number of view and contributions to a project are provided (Kubilius, 2014) . The registry of research data repositories, re3data.org, ha s indexed more than 1,200 as of May 2015 2 . However, only a few of these repositories (i.e. , Figshare, SlideShare and Github) include social functionalities and have reached a certain level of participation from scholars (e.g., Begel, Bosch, & Storey, 2013; Kubilius, 2014) .
Video provide s yet another genre for social interaction and scholarly communication (Kousha, Thelwall, & Abdoli, 2012; Sugimoto & Thelwall, 2013) . Of the various video sharing platforms, YouTube, launched in 2005, is by far the most popular
A study of UK scholars reports that the majority o f respondents engaged with video for scholarly communication purposes (Tenopir et al., 2013) , yet only 20% have ever created in that genre. Among British PhD students, 17% had used videos and podcasts passively for research, while 8% had actively contributed (British Library et al., 2012) .
Blogs began in the mid -1990s and were considered ubiquitous by the mid- 200 0s (Gillmor, 2006; Hank, 2011; Lenhart & Fox, 2006; Rainie, 2005) . Scholarly blogs emerged during this time with their own neologisms (e.g., blogademia , blawgosphere , bloggership) and body of research (Hank, 2011) and were considered to change the exclusive structure of scholarly communication
Technorati, considered t o be on e of the largest ind ex of blogs, deleted their entire blog directory in 2014 3 . Individual blogs are also subject to abrupt cancellations and deletions, making questionable the degree to which blogging meets the permanence criteria of scholarly commu nication (Hank, 2011) .
ResearchBlogging.org (RB) — “an aggregator of blog posts referencing peer -reviewed research in a structured manner” (Shema, Bar -Ilan, & Thelwall, 2015, p. 3) — was launched in 2007 and has been a fairly stable structure in the scholarly blogging environment. RB both aggregates and —through the use of the RB icon — credentials scholarly blogs (Shema et al., 2015) . The informality of the genre (Mewburn & Thomson, 2013) and the ability to circumve nt traditional publishing barr iers has led advocates to claim that blogging can invert traditional academic power hierarchies (Walker, 2006) , allow ing people to construct scholarly identities outside of formal institutionalization (Ewins, 2005; Luzón, 2011; Potter, 2012) and democratize the scientific system (Gijón, 2013) . Another positive characteristic of blogs is their “inherently social” nature (Walker, 2006, p. 132) (see also Kjellberg, 2010; Luzón, 2011 ). Scholars have noted the potential for “communal scholarship” (Hendrick, 2012) made by linking and commenting, calling the platform “a new ‘third place’ for academic discourse” (Halavais, 2006, p. 117) . Commenting functionalities were seen as making possible the “shift from public understanding to public engagement with science” (Kouper, 2010, p. 1) .
Studies have also provided evidence of high rate s of blogging among certain subpopulations: for example, approximately one -third of German university staff (Pscheida et al., 2013) and one fifth of UK doctoral students use blogs (Carpenter et al., 2012) .
Academics are not only producers, but also consumers of blogs: a 2007 survey of medical bloggers foundthat the large majority (86%) read blogs to find medical news (Kovic et al., 2008)

Mahrt and Puschmann (2014) , who defined science blogging as “the use of blogs for science communication” (p. 1). It has been similarly likened to a sp ace for public intellectualism (Kirkup, 2010; Walker, 2006) and as a form of activism to combat perceived biased or pseudoscience (Riesch & Mendel, 2014. Yet, there remains a tension between science bloggers and science journalists, with many science journals dismissing the value of science blogs (Colson, 2011)

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while there has been anecdotal evidence of the use of blogs in promotion and tenure (e.g., (Podgor, 2006) the consensus seem s to suggest that most institutions do not value blogging as highly as publishing in traditional outlets, or consider blogging as a measure of service rather than research activity (Hendricks, 2010, para. 30) .
Microblogging developed out of a particular blogging practice, wherein bloggers would post small messages or single files on a blog post. Blogs that focused on such “microposts” were then termed “tumblelogs” and were described as “a quick and dirty stream of consciousness” kind of blogging (Kottke, 2005, para. 2)
most popular microblogs are Twitter (launched in 2006), tumblr (launched in 2007), FriendFeed (launched in 2007 and available in several languages), Plurk (launched in 2008 and popular in Taiwan), and Sina Weibo (launched in 2009 and popular in China).
users to follow other users, search tweets by keywords or hashtags, and link to other media or other tweets
.

Conference chatter (backchanneling) is another widely studied area in the realm of scholarly microblogging. Twitter use at conferences is generally carried out by a minority of participants

Wikis are collaborative content management platforms enabled by web browsers and embedded markup languages.
Wikipedia has been advocated as a replacement for traditional publishing and peer review models (Xia o & Askin, 2012) and pleas have been made to encourage experts to contribute (Rush & Tracy, 2010) . Despite this, contribution rates remain low — likely hindered by the lack of explicit authorship in Wikipedia, a cornerstone of the traditional academic reward system (Black, 2008; Butler, 2008; Callaway, 2010; Whitworth & Friedman, 2009) . Citations to scholarly documents —another critical component in the reward system —are increasingly being found i n Wikiped ia entries (Bould et al., 2014; Park, 2011; Rousidis et al., 2013) , but are no t yet seen as valid impact indicators (Haustein, Peters, Bar -Ilan, et al., 2014) .
The altmetrics manifesto (Priem et al., 2010, para. 1) , altmetrics can serve as filters , which “reflect the broad, rapid impact of scholarship in this burgeoning ecosystem”.
There are also a host of platforms which are being used informally to discuss and rate scholarly material. Reddit, for example, is a general topic platform where users can submit, discuss and rate online content. Historically, mentions of scientific journals on Reddit have been rare (Thelwall, Haustein, et al., 2013) . However, several new subreddits —e.g., science subreddit 4 , Ask Me Anything sessions 5 –have recently been launched, focusing on the discussion of scientific information. Sites like Amazon (Kousha & Thelwall, 2015) and Goodreads (Zuccala, Verleysen, Cornacchia, & Engels, 2015) , which allow users to comment on and rate books, has also been mined as potential source for the compilation of impact indicators
libraries provide services to support researchers’ use of social media tools and metrics (Lapinski, Piwowar, & Priem, 2013; Rodgers & Barbrow, 2013; Roemer & Borchardt, 2013). One example is Mendeley Institutional Edition, https://www.elsevier.com/solutions/mendeley/Mendeley-Institutional-Edition, which mines Mendeley documents, annotations, and behavior and provides these data to libraries (Galligan & Dyas -Correia, 2013) . Libraries can use them for collection management, in a manner similar to other usage data, such as COUNTER statistics (Galligan & Dyas -Correia, 2013) .
Factors affecting social media use; age, academic rank and status, gender, discipline, country and language,

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more on altmetrics in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=altmetrics

collaborative whiteboards

Collaborative Whiteboards

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Three Free Collaborative Whiteboard Tools

NoteBookCast is a free whiteboard tool that will work in the web browser on a laptop, iPad, Android tablet, and Windows tablet. NoteBookCast is a collaborative whiteboard tool. You can invite others to join your whiteboard by entering the code assigned to your whiteboard. You can chat while drawing on NoteBookCast whiteboards. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to use NoteBookCast.

Web Whiteboard makes it easy to include a whiteboard in your Google+ Hangout. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how easy it is to use Web Whiteboard in a Google+ Hangout.

Stoodle is a free collaborative whiteboard tool hosted by the CK12 Foundation. You can use text chat while sharing your whiteboard. Registration is not required in order to use Stoodle. In the video embedded below I demonstrate the features of Stoodle.

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more on white boards in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=white+boards

fake news

#FakeNews

View post on imgur.com

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Report: Digital Natives ‘Easily Duped’ by Information Online

By Sri Ravipati 12/07/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/07/report-digital-natives-easily-duped-by-information-online.aspx

Researchers at the Stanford Graduate School of Education assessed middle, high school and college students on the their civic online reasoning skills, or “the ability to judge the credibility of information that floods young people’s smartphones, tablets and computers.”

The Stanford History Education Group recently released a report that analyzes 7,804 responses collected from students across 12 states and varying economic lines, including well-resourced, under-resourced and inner-city schools.

when it comes to evaluating information that flows on social media channels like Facebook and Twitter, students “are easily duped” and have trouble discerning advertisements from news articles.

Many people assume that today’s students – growing up as “digital natives” – are intuitively perceptive online. The Stanford researchers found the opposite to be true and urge teachers to create curricula focused on developing students’ civil reasoning skills. They plan to produce “a series of high-quality web videos to showcase the depth of the problem” that will “demonstrate the link between digital literacy and citizenship,” according to the report.

The report, “Evaluating Information: The Cornerstone of Civic Online Reasoning,” can be found here.

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more on information literacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=information+literacy

 

reference and libraries

Basic Reference Skills for Non-Reference Librarians
facilitated by Francisca Goldsmith
4-week eCourse Beginning Monday, February 6, 2017

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/272376987_The_Reference_Guide_to_Data_Sources_by_Julia_Bauder

http://vps100323.vps.ovh.ca/NewYorkbooksBox-27/3722198380-the-reference-guide-to-data-sources-by-julia-bauder.pdf

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/article/view/5888/pdf

Bauder, J., Bohstedt, B., & Jones, P. (2011). Muchos Mentores en Iowa: The Pedagogy of Student to Student Mentoring in Information Literacy (pp. 149–154). Presented at the LOEX.

http://commons.emich.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1025&context=loexconf2011

Reinventing your Reference Collection from media3693

Reinventing Ourselves as Internet Librarians from notess

Thursdays with the California Library Association (CLA) from Justin Hoenke

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more on reference in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=reference

immune to info overload

My note: I wonder if/how this confidence correlates to the #FakeNews phenomenon

The surprising reason you’re (nearly) immune to ‘information overload’

Published: Dec 9, 2016 9:00 a.m. ET ByCatey Hill Editor

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-surprising-reason-youre-nearly-immune-to-information-overload-2016-12-07

Just 20% of Americans say they feel overloaded by information, compared with 27% who said they felt overloaded a decade ago, according to data released Wednesday by the Washington, D.C.-based Pew Research Center

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more on information overload in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=information+overload

Save

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digital humanities fellowship

Digital Humanities Fellowship

The American Philosophical Society (APS) Library in Philadelphia seeks applicants for its new Digital Humanities Fellowship.

This fellowship, for up to two (2) months, is open to scholars who are comfortable creating tools and visualizations, as well as those interested in working collaboratively with the APS technology team.

Librarians, scholars, and graduate students (MLIS or other) at any stage of their career may apply. Special consideration will be given to proposals that present APS Library holdings in new and engaging ways. Examples include (but are not limited to) projects that incorporate timelines, text analytics, network graphs, and maps.

Stipend: $3,000 per month will be awarded to the successful applicant after their arrival at the Library.

All Applicants must submit:

Cover letter
Curriculum vitae
Prospectus for a digital project
Examples of previous digital humanities projects (if available)
Contact information for two people who will submit confidential letters of reference

Full details are available on the application webpage:

http://apply.interfolio.com/31863

All application materials will be submitted online.

Application Deadline: March 1, 2017. Notifications will be sent by April 15.

For more information on the APS Library and access to searchable catalogs:

http://www.amphilsoc.org/library

Contact: Earle Spamer at Libfellows@amphilsoc.org

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more on digital humanities in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+humanities

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