Archive of ‘Library and information science’ category

eportfolio as a process

4 things you should know about digital portfolios

BY MATT RENWICK December 6th, 2018
https://www.eschoolnews.com/2018/12/06/4-things-you-should-know-about-digital-portfolios/
1. Portfolio assessment is not new to education.
Digital portfolios came into prominence in the 1990s, around the time when computers became commonplace in classrooms. David Niguidula, a pioneer in this alternative form of assessment, coined the term “digital student portfolios.” He defines them as “an online collection of student work for a particular purpose and audience.” Digital portfolios cut the distance between student thinking and evidence of learning. There is no longer a need to represent understanding through a score or a grade.

2. . The best digital portfolios are process oriented.
A myth in education is that we should only showcase student’s best artifacts of learning. We might think of an artist’s body of work when considering digital portfolios as an alternative assessment.

3. It’s not a digital portfolio unless students are in charge.

4. Digital student portfolios are about more than just assessment.
The best digital portfolio processes do more than serve as an evaluation tool. They help the student develop a stronger sense of themselves as a learner and see their growth over time, such as through a series of drafts posted toward a final project and presentation.

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more on eportoflio in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=eportfolio

technologies for life long learning

Emerging Technologies for Lifelong Learning:
Intro to #EmTechMOOC and EmTechWIKI from SUNY

“… open-access resource… to identify the value and implications of using established and emerging technology tools for personal and professional growth…strategies to … keep pace with technology change.

“… #EmTechMOOC, – Coursera Massive Open Online Course

“…EmTechWIKI …socially-curated discovery engine to discover tools, tutorials, and resources. The WIKI can be used as a stand-alone resource, or it can be used together with #EmTechMOOC. Anyone is welcome to add or edit WIKI resources.”

” – excerpt from https://www.coursera.org/learn/emerging-technologies-lifelong-learning,

Guests

Roberta (Robin) Sullivan, Online Learning Specialist, Center for Educational Innovation, University at Buffalo

Blockchain next election

Blockchain Disciples Have a New Goal: Running Our Next Election

Amid vote-hacking fears, election officials are jumping on the crypto bandwagon — but cybersecurity experts are sounding an alarm

At democracy’s heart lies a set of paradoxes: a delicate interplay of identity and anonymity, secrecy and transparency. To be sure you are eligible to vote and that you do so only once, the authorities need to know who you are. But when it comes time for you to mark a ballot, the government must guarantee your privacy and anonymity. After the fact, it also needs to provide some means for a third party to audit the election, while also preventing you from obtaining definitive proof of your choice, which could lead to vote selling or coercion.
Building a system that accomplishes all this at once — and does so securely — is challenging enough in the physical world. It’s even harder online, as the recent revelation that Russian intelligence operatives compromised voting systems in multiple states makes clear.
In the decade since the elusive Satoshi Nakamoto published an infamous white paper outlining the idea behind bitcoin, a “peer-to-peer electronic cash system” based on a mathematical “consensus mechanism,” more than 1,500 new cryptocurrencies have come into being.
definition: Nathan Heller in the New Yorker, in which he compares the blockchain to a scarf knit with a single ball of yarn. “It’s impossible to remove part of the fabric, or to substitute a swatch, without leaving some trace,” Heller wrote. Typically, blockchains are created by a set of stakeholders working to achieve consensus at every step, so it might be even more apt to picture a knitting collective creating that single scarf together, moving forward only when a majority agrees that a given knot is acceptable.
Unlike bitcoin, a public blockchain powered by thousands of miners around the world, most voting systems, including Votem’s, employ what’s known as a “permissioned ledger,” in which a handful of approved groups (political parties, election observers, government entities) would be allowed to validate the transactions.
there’s the issue of targeted denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, in which a hacker directs so much traffic at a server that it’s overwhelmed and ceases to function.
Although a distributed ledger itself would likely withstand such an attack, the rest of the system — from voters’ personal devices to the many servers a vote would pass through on its way to the blockchain — would remain vulnerable.
there’s the so-called penetration attack, like the University of Michigan incursion, in which an adversary gains control of a server and deliberately alters the outcome of an election.
While it’s true that information recorded on a blockchain cannot be changed, a determined hacker might well find another way to disrupt the process. Bitcoin itself has never been hacked, for instance, but numerous bitcoin “wallets” have been, resulting in billions of dollars in losses. In early June 2018, a South Korean cryptocurrency exchange was penetrated, causing the value of bitcoin to tumble and resulting in a loss of $42 billion in market value. So although recording the vote tally on a blockchain introduces a new obstacle to penetration attacks, it still leaves holes elsewhere in the system — like putting a new lock on your front door but leaving your basement windows open.
A blockchain is only as valuable as the data stored on it. And whereas traditional paper ballots preserve an indelible record of the actual intent of each voter, digital votes “don’t produce an original hard-copy record of any kind,”
In the end, democracy always depends on a certain leap of faith, and faith can never be reduced to a mathematical formula. The Economist Intelligence Unit regularly ranks the world’s most democratic counties. In 2017, the United States came in 21st place, after Uruguay and Malta. Meanwhile, it’s now widely believed that John F. Kennedy owed his 1960 win to election tampering in Chicago. The Supreme Court decision granting the presidency to George W. Bush rather than calling a do-over — despite Al Gore’s popular-vote win — still seems iffy. Significant doubts remain about the 2016 presidential race.
While little doubt remains that Russia favored Trump in the 2016 election, the Kremlin’s primary target appears to have been our trust in the system itself. So if the blockchain’s trendy allure can bolster trust in American democracy, maybe that’s a net positive for our national security. If someone manages to hack the system, hopefully they’ll do so quietly. Apologies to George Orwell, but sometimes ignorance really is strength.

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

Bitcoin explained through Pokemon

Explaining Bitcoin with Pokemon cards

the double-spending problem
when exchanging digital goods, how do you know somebody hasn’t sent the same asset to two people simultaneously?
use a ledger (a record of transactions) to track our trade.put our trust in this third party.we gave a copy of the ledger to every pokemon trader

forming chain of blocks

if I had duplicated my card, sent one copy out earlier then tried to send the second one to you, the history of that trade would already exist, so my second trade to you would conflict and be rejected.
change a block

that digital signature that gets put on each block? That is actually generated based on the info in the block, so changing the data (i.e removing my trade) automatically changes the signature.
changed block

an open, decentralised, non-reversible, tamper-proof digital network for trading valuable assets.

This is a simplified version of how blockchain technology works, but it’s easy to see how this tech gives Bitcoin its unique and fascinating properties.

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

 

Sites in VR

Sites in VR is a free Android and iOS app that provides a 1700 virtual reality views of significant landmarks around the world.

http://www.sitesinvr.com/

Contact us if you need for your class to view the information above with:

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more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

MinnState Shark Innovation Grants

Stephen Kelly, the Open Education and Innovation Program Coordinator shared great info on the Shark Innovation Grants.

Shark Innovation Grant

Please have a link to the information regarding the grants: https://asanewsletter.org/2018/11/19/announcing-the-2019-innovation-funding-round/

Please have this recording with more details shared by Stephen today.

For more information, he can be reached at stephen.kelly@minnstate.edu.

InforMedia Services can help you brainstorm ideas, prepare them for the grant and execute them.

Flipgrid Live

You're in the right place! Holly Clark's Flipgrid Feature: Empowering Gen Z debuts LIVE right here at 7:00 PM CT!Check…

Posted by Flipgrid on Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Recording available here: https://vimeo.com/302720572/a2d799560f

#GridTip: Flipgrid + Screencastify

https://blog.flipgrid.com/news/screencastify

Screencastify is a tool that allows students and educators to personalize their learning experience through sharing their voice via a screen recording. The app is a Chrome extension, meaning the tool is always at the ready whenever you want to capture some magic!

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More about Flipgrid in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=flipgrid

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