Archive of ‘Library and information science’ category

physics marble trackes

Physics marble tracks

He knows how to make physics not boring.via youtube.com/YeanyScience

Posted by Now I've Seen Everything on Thursday, January 11, 2018

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more about physics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=physics

 

 

VR in education must experiment

Riddell, R. (2018, February 2). Ed shouldn’t invest heavily in VR yet, but experimentation is key. Retrieved February 2, 2018, from https://www.educationdive.com/news/ed-shouldnt-invest-heavily-in-vr-yet-but-experimentation-is-key/516160/
Google, for instance, has made virtual field trips to inaccessible locations easier for history and social studies classes with its Cardboard viewers used in conjunction with the Expeditions app. And technologies like zSpace have expanded opportunities in STEM subjects with virtual interactive dissections, diagrams and experiments.

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more on VR in education in this IMS blog

media technology and well being

Kushlev, K. (2018). Media technology and well-being: A complementarity-interference model. In E.Diener, S. Oishi, & L. Tay (Eds.), Handbook of well-being. Salt Lake City, UT: DEF Publishers. DOI:nobascholar.com.  Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/35761357/Media_Technology_and_Well-Being_A_Complementarity-Interference_Model
Media technology—from mass media to social media and from video gaming to computer-mediated communication—plays an increasingly central role in people’s lives. Due to exponential increases in computing power, people now carry incredibly powerful computers—their smartphones—everywhere they go. This ever-greater access to media technology is generating an ever-greater conflict between media activities and the unmediated activities critical for psychological well-being—from our face-to-face conversations and family time to our down time and work lives. What are the costs and benefits of people’s modern media technology use for psychological well-being? Using a complementarity-interference (CI) framework, I review research to illuminate key psychological processes (i.e., mediators) and conditions (i.e., moderators) of the relationship between media technology and psychological well-being. Based on the existing evidence, I propose an initial theoretical CI model of the effects of media technology on psychological well-being. I use this CI model to outline important directions for future research, providing guidelines for an integrated, theoretically informed research on media technology.
Keywords: Media, Communication technology, Computer-mediated communication (CMC), Subjective well-being, Human-computer interaction (HCI)
Definition Media Technology
Media technology. In this chapter, we will explore psychological well-being in the context of modern media technology. In common parlance, we often think of the word ‘media’ as referring to mass media, such as news media (e.g., TV, radio), and more recently, to social media (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram). But media—the plural of medium—broadly refers to any technological tool that serves as a bridge or conduit to stimuli not otherwise available in the immediate physical environment. Thus, media technology refers to books and newspapers, radio and television, video and computer games—or to any device or method people use to transcend the constraints of their immediate physical environment: from yesterday’s dial-up telephone to the today’s smartphone, and from writing a hand-written letter to texting a friend (c.f., Okdie et al., 2014). Related terms also exist in the literature including information and communication technology, or ICT, as well as computer-mediated communication, or CMC. Most of the findings discussed here apply to—and in fact come from—the literature on ICT and CMC
While using the broad term, media technology, this chapter will focus primarily on the effects of media technology developed in the past century or so, including television, video games, and, most recently, mobile computers such as smartphones. In other words, we will be focusing on screen media technology. I will use the term mediated to refer to the stimuli afforded by the media technology, and the term unmediated to refer to behavior that does not involve the use of media (e.g., face-to-face interactions). Even though media technology itself is physical, I will use the term immediate physical environment to refer to the environment in which the media technology use occurs.

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more on contemplative computing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

Putin’s game

What Putin Really Wants

Russia’s strongman president has many Americans convinced of his manipulative genius. He’s really just a gambler who won big.

JULIA IOFFE  JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 ISSUE

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/01/putins-game/546548/

(translated in Bulgarian http://librev.com/index.php/2013-03-30-08-56-39/prospects/europe/3371-igrata-na-putin-1

“They do plan,” said a senior Obama-administration official. “They’re not stupid at all. But the idea that they have this all perfectly planned and that Putin is an amazing chess player—that’s not quite it. He knows where he wants to end up, he plans the first few moves, and then he figures out the rest later. People ask if he plays chess or checkers. It’s neither: He plays blackjack. He has a higher acceptance of risk. Think about it. The election interference—that was pretty risky, what he did. If Hillary Clinton had won, there would’ve been hell to pay.”

Even the manner of the Russian attack was risky. The fact that the Russians didn’t really bother hiding their fingerprints is a testament to the change in Russia’s intent toward the U.S., Robert Hannigan, a former head of the Government Communications Headquarters, the British analogue to the National Security Agency, said at the Aspen Forum. “The brazen recklessness of it … the fact that they don’t seem to care that it’s attributed to them very publicly, is the biggest change.”

also: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/11/13/hacking-voting/

in German: http://www.sueddeutsche.de/medien/phishing-attacken-der-feind-liest-mit-1.3378411

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more on cybersecurity in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cybersecurity

Blockchain, Money and Empathy

On Blockchain, Money and Empathy: EdSurge Talks Trends and 2018 Predictions

By Jeffrey R. Young     Jan 30, 2018

EdSurge’s CEO, Betsy Corcoran, argued that 2017 was a year when educators and schools were trying to take control of their technology choices “We have said from the time we started writing the newsletters that not every piece of technology will work for every student, or for every school or every classroom,” she said. “It’s all about asking the right questions to figure out if there is a piece of technology that will support learning goals. What we’re starting to really see across schools, districts and teachers, people really owning those questions. They’re saying, ‘What do I want to do with my classroom? With my kids? And what are the technologies that will support me?’”

Another discussion participant asked whether colleges and universities are starting to accept cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, or experimenting with the blockchain technology that drives those systems. Johnson said most of the hype around unversities’ blockchain experiments has centered on storing and managing credentials.

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more on blockchain and education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain+education

Principalship EDAD

Link to this blog entry: http://bit.ly/principaledad

Fri, Feb. 2, 2018, Principalship class, 22 people, Plymouth room 103

Instructor Jim Johnson  EDAD principalship class

The many different roles of the principals:

Communication

Effective communication is one critical characteristics of effective and successful school principal. Research on effective schools and instructional leadership emphasizes the impact of principal leadership on creating safe and secure learning environment and positive nurturing school climate (Halawah, 2005, p. 334)

Halawah, I. (2005). The Relationship between Effective Communication of High School Principal and School Climate. Education, 126(2), 334-345.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ765683%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Selection of school principals in Hong Kong. The findings confirm a four-factor set of expectations sought from applicants; these are Generic Managerial Skills; Communication and Presentation Skills; Knowledge and Experience; and Religious Value Orientation.

Kwan, P. (2012). Assessing school principal candidates: perspectives of the hiring superintendents. International Journal Of Leadership In Education, 15(3), 331-349. doi:10.1080/13603124.2011.617838

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d77658138%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Yee, D. L. (2000). Images of school principals’ information and communications technology leadership. Journal of Information Technology for Teacher Education, 9(3), 287–302. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759390000200097

Catano, N., & Stronge, J. H. (2007). What do we expect of school principals? Congruence between principal evaluation and performance standards. International Journal of Leadership in Education, 10(4), 379–399. https://doi.org/10.1080/13603120701381782

Communication can consist of two large areas:

  • broadcasting information: PR, promotions, notifications etc.
  • two-way communication: collecting feedback, “office hours” type of communication, backchanneling, etc.

Further communication initiated by/from principals can have different audiences

  • staff: teachers, maintenance etc.

Ärlestig, H. (2008). Communication between principals and teachers in successful schools. DIVA. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:umu:diva-1927

Reyes, P., & Hoyle, D. (1992). Teachers’ Satisfaction With Principals’ Communication. The Journal of Educational Research, 85(3), 163–168. https://doi.org/10.1080/00220671.1992.9944433

  • parents: involvement, feeling of empowerment, support, volunteering
  • students
  • board members
  • community

Epstein, J. L. (1995). School/family/community partnerships – ProQuest. Phi Delta Kappan, 76(9), 701.

  • Others

Communication and Visualization

The ever-growing necessity to be able to communicate data to different audiences in digestible format.

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/07/15/large-scale-visualization/

So, how do we organize and exercise communication with these audiences and considering the different content to be communicated?

  • How do you use to do it at your school, when you were students 20-30 years ago?
  • How is it different now?
  • How do you think it must be changed?

Communication tools:

physical

  • paper-based memos, physical boards

Electronic

  • phone, Intercom, email, electronic boards (listservs)

21st century electronic tools

  • Electronic boards
    • Pinterest
  • Internet telephony and desktopsharing
    • Adobe Connect, Webex, Zoom, GoToMeeting, Teamviewer etc.
    • Skype, Google Hangouts, Facebook Messenger
  • Electronic calendars
    • Doodle, MS Offce365, Google Calendar
  • Social media / The Cloud
    • Visuals: Flickr, YouTube, TeacherTube, MediaSpace
    • Podasts
    • Direct two-way communication
      • Asynchronous
        • Snapchat
        • Facebook
        • Twitter
        • LinkedIn
        • Instagram
      • Synchronous
        • Chat
        • Audio/video/desktopsharing
      • Management tools

 

Tools:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/07/16/communication-tool-for-teachers-and-parents/

Top 10 Social Media Management Tools: beyond Hootsuite and TweetDeck

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/17/top-10-social-media-management-tools-beyond-hootsuite-and-tweetdeck/

Manage control of your passwords and logons (Password Managers)

  • 1Password.
  • Okta.
  • Keeper.
  • KeePass.
  • Centrify Application Services.
  • RoboForm.
  • Zoho Vault.
  • Passpack.
  • LastPass

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class discussion Feb 2.

PeachJar : https://www.peachjar.com/

Seesaw: https://web.seesaw.me/

Schoology: https://www.schoology.com/

 

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Group Assignment

considering the information discussed in class, split in groups of 4 and develop your institution strategy for effective and modern communication across and out of your school.

>>>>>>>>>>> Word of the day: blockchain credentialing <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>> K12 Trends 4 2018 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

 

 

TeacherGaming

TeacherGaming Raises $1.6M to Grow Subscription-Based Classroom Gaming Platform

Jan 30, 2018

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-01-30-teachergaming-raises-1-6m-to-grow-subscription-based-classroom-gaming-platform

TeacherGaming is a subscription-based suite of educational games for the classroom, ranging from $150 to $1150 per year depending on class size. The system includes lesson plans and an analytics platform for educators to track student activity and progress.

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More on gaming in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gaming

more on MInecraft in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=minecraft

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