InforMedia Services (IMS)

Technology Instruction for St. Cloud State University

Archive for the 'Library and information science' Category

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 20th November 2013

A Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats

http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats

This past week, I had the privilege of introducing US Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, as a guest moderator for #edtechchat, an educational Twitter chat that I founded with four members of my personal learning network (PLN).  Over the course of 60 minutes, almost 2,000 people from around the world, shared about 10,000 tweets in response to the Secretary’s six questions related to being a Connected Educator.  Secretary Duncan (@arneduncan) and his Office of Educational Technology (@officeofedtech) deemed October “Connected Educator’s Month” for the second straight year.  To close #ce13, Secretary Duncan used the #edtechchat forum to engage in conversation with educators from all over the world.

In reflecting on the chat, many people asked how to get started, and how to possibly follow such a quick flow of information. For one, 10,000 tweets in an hour is by no means typical; but then again, neither is the opportunity to interact with the US Secretary of Education. Although this particular chat with the Secretary may be an extreme example of what possibilities can arise when connecting with others online, each week there are over 160 chats that occur.  Virtually all topics are covered in some fashion. Whether you’re a 4th grade teacher (#4thchat) in Maryland (#mdedchat), a principal (#cpchat) in Arkansas (#arkedchat), a new teacher (#ntchat) in Rhode Island (#edchatri), or a parent (#ptchat) connecting on a Saturday (#satchat), there’s something for you.

This Quick Start Guide to Participating in Twitter Chats was created as part of the Digital Learning Transition MOOC (#dltmooc), an online “Massive Open Online Course”, developed by The Alliance for Education (@All4Ed) and the Friday Institute (@FridayInstitute) as part of Project 24 (@all4edproject24).  Feel free to download and share the Quick Start resource to help educators get started.

Furthermore, the Official Chat List was created by Chad Evans (@cevans5095) and me (@thomascmurray), with help from our good friend Jerry Blumengarten (@cybraryman1). This resource (shortcut: bit.ly/officialchatlist) is a comprehensive list of the educational Twitter chats that take place each week.

Start small. Choose a chat that peaks your interest. Lurk, listen, and learn. When you’re ready, jump in head first.  Grow your PLN and get connected through a Twitter chat this week!  Your students will benefit.

- See more at: http://www.guide2digitallearning.com/blog_tom_murray/quick_start_guide_twitter_chats#sthash.W1DPfmY1.dpuf

Posted in collaboration and creativity, e-learning, educational technology, information literacy, information technology, instructional technology, learning, mobile devices, mobile learning, MOOC, mooc, online learning, open learning, pedagogy, social media, student-centered learning, technology, technology literacy, Twitter | No Comments »

New Roles for New Times: Transforming Liaison Roles in Research Libraries

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 18th November 2013

Posted in Library and information science | No Comments »

visual literacy: visually represented

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 17th November 2013

http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/KUW/Keeping%20up%20With%20Visual%20Literacy%20Figure%201.jpg

http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/KUW/Keeping%20up%20With%20Visual%20Literacy%20Figure%201.jpg” alt=”some_text”>

Posted in media literacy, technology literacy | No Comments »

A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE 21ST CENTURY ACADEMIC LIBRARIES AND LIBRARIANS: PROSPECTUS AND OPPORTUNITIES

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 17th November 2013

http://www.journalsgate.com/paper/ps2.pdf

A PARADIGM SHIFT IN THE 21ST CENTURY ACADEMIC LIBRARIES AND LIBRARIANS: PROSPECTUS AND OPPORTUNITIES

How InforMedia Services fits in this new structure of LRS

The old concept of book-oriented librarianship has long been taken over by user-centred librarianship (p. 133)

Academic libraries are therefore, to support the three main institutional activities teaching, learning and research of their academic community staff, students and researchers.

Table 1:

  • liaisons (IMS did do it, can do it)
  • 24/7 online and virtual reference services (IMS did do it, can do it)
  • To support education (IMS did do it, can do it)
outreach programming (p. 135). IMS needs to transform poorly visited workshops into outreach programming.

Open and Distance Learning (ODL), learning management systems, M-Learning, online education venture, virtual campus and Flipped Classrooms (p. 136). IMS (as I repeat for years now), must be in charge of the online education, and under its umbrella, D2L and other technologies must be put, not the other way around.

Social Media (p. 137). IMS must be ahead of LRS, who needs to be ahead of the compus in social media.

If we support the second school of thought (p. 138) and the premise : “Google can bring you back 100,000 answers, a librarian can bring you back the right one” (Gaiman, n.d.),” IMS must join LRS, namely changing with the academic librarians from an old-fashioned book worm (librarians) or PowerPoint “expert” (specific IMS member right now0 to digital experts. Which means that D2L MUST BE gradually abandoned as the foremost if not only responsibility of IMS and IMS and its members must move into social media, web design and development and interactivity (versus multimedia only)

 

Posted in Library and information science | No Comments »

Meagan Oakleaf leading a workshop on Library Assessment

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 16th November 2013

Per my tweets to the SCSU Technology (@SCSUtechinstruc) entries of today:
#MeaganOakleaf
#LibraryAssessment https://vine.co/v/htK3KDvATYq 

#LibraryAssessment and #Faculty http://ow.ly/i/3JH11  http://ow.ly/i/3JHeB  #MeaganOakleaf

#MeaganOakleaf #pm #retention and #LibraryAssessment http://ow.ly/i/3JGos 

#AssessmentManagementSystem http://ow.ly/i/3JFZJ 

Students acquire information literacy skills but assessments are scattered… #pm ##LibraryAssessment

#pm #LibraryAssessment further on #value http://ow.ly/i/3JESN 

Posted in Library and information science | No Comments »

Death by PowerPoint (from #POD13)

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 11th November 2013

what is it:

http://www.slideshare.net/thecroaker/death-by-powerpoint
http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2013/08/death-by-powerpoint-2/

http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/Columns/PowerPoint.pdf
http://www.forbes.com/sites/rogerdooley/2012/10/11/death-by-powerpoint/

how it could be:

Nancy Duarte: The secret structure of great talks

http://www.ted.com/talks/nancy_duarte_the_secret_structure_of_great_talks.html

Cheating Death by PowerPoint: Analyze and Synthesize

http://my.brainshark.com/Cheating-Death-by-PowerPoint-Analyze-and-Synthesize-738618804

how to do storytelling:

How to tell a story (6 talks) 

http://www.ted.com/playlists/62/how_to_tell_a_story.html 

Posted in Digital literacy, media literacy, teaching, technology literacy, virtualization, visual basics | No Comments »

Pinterest Is Now The Fastest Growing Content-Sharing Platform

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 7th November 2013

Pinterest Is Now The Fastest Growing Content-Sharing Platform

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/pinterest-is-fastest-growing-content-sharing-platform-2013-11#ixzz2jxRe8Hfa

The new data offers a reminder that businesses should look beyond Facebook and Twitter when managing their social media outreach, says ShareThis CEO Kurt Abrahamson in a release.

Small businesses can capitalize on the Pinterest and LinkedIn surge to market their products and grow their consumer base. Pinterest, a highly visual medium, gives businesses a chance to catch the eye of consumers with compelling images and colorful infographics that promote deals and new products. Pinning pictures of employees could also help customers identify with the people who work at the company, putting a face to a name. Meanwhile, LinkedIn can provide a more professional forum for blogging and sharing posts to a targeted audience, as well as collecting positive recommendations and reviews of your company.

LRS can help students, faculty and staff:
- identify objects and services by posting pictures
- identify people who work at the library and how they can help students, faculty and staff 

just few of the analogies drawn from the article…

Posted in evaluation, media literacy, pinterest, social media, teaching, technology literacy | 2 Comments »

On teaching and libraries: excerpt from an interview of “Spiegel” with Umberto Eco

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 5th November 2013

http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/spiegel-interview-with-umberto-eco-we-like-lists-because-we-don-t-want-to-die-a-659577-2.html

SPIEGEL: But you also said that lists can establish order. So, do both order and anarchy apply? That would make the Internet, and the lists that the search engine Google creates, prefect for you.

Eco: Yes, in the case of Google, both things do converge. Google makes a list, but the minute I look at my Google-generated list, it has already changed. These lists can be dangerous — not for old people like me, who have acquired their knowledge in another way, but for young people, for whom Google is a tragedy. Schools ought to teach the high art of how to be discriminating.

SPIEGEL: Are you saying that teachers should instruct students on the difference between good and bad? If so, how should they do that?

Eco: Education should return to the way it was in the workshops of the Renaissance. There, the masters may not necessarily have been able to explain to their students why a painting was good in theoretical terms, but they did so in more practical ways. Look, this is what your finger can look like, and this is what it has to look like. Look, this is a good mixing of colors. The same approach should be used in school when dealing with the Internet. The teacher should say: “Choose any old subject, whether it be German history or the life of ants. Search 25 different Web pages and, by comparing them, try to figure out which one has good information.” If 10 pages describe the same thing, it can be a sign that the information printed there is correct. But it can also be a sign that some sites merely copied the others’ mistakes.

SPIEGEL: You yourself are more likely to work with books, and you have a library of 30,000 volumes. It probably doesn’t work without a list or catalogue.

Eco: I’m afraid that, by now, it might actually be 50,000 books. When my secretary wanted to catalogue them, I asked her not to. My interests change constantly, and so does my library. By the way, if you constantly change your interests, your library will constantly be saying something different about you. Besides, even without a catalogue, I’m forced to remember my books. I have a hallway for literature that’s 70 meters long. I walk through it several times a day, and I feel good when I do. Culture isn’t knowing when Napoleon died. Culture means knowing how I can find out in two minutes. Of course, nowadays I can find this kind of information on the Internet in no time. But, as I said, you never know with the Internet.

 

Posted in Digital literacy, information literacy, learning, Library and information science | No Comments »

Using join.me to Help Library Patrons

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 4th November 2013

https://join.me/

Using join.me to Help Library Patrons

http://digitalcommons.olivet.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1009&context=lsci_facp

Posted in lecture capture, Library and information science, screencasting, technology, technology literacy | No Comments »

10 TWITTER TIPS FOR TEACHERS

Posted by Plamen Miltenoff on 3rd November 2013

http://www.educationreview.co.nz/ict-and-procurement/november-2013/10-twitter-tips-for-teachers/#.UnWbJ_msiM7

10 TWITTER TIPS FOR TEACHERS

1 Use TweetDeck

2 The more you give, the more you get

3 The power of the hashtag

4 Join the #edchatNZ club

5 Focus on following not followers

6 Make use of lists

7 Saving tweets for a rainy day

8 Don’t be a boring tweeter

9 Teaching with Twitter

10 The art of pithiness

Posted in Digital literacy, digital storytelling, educational technology, information literacy, instructional technology, mobile learning, social media, technology literacy, twitter, Twitter | No Comments »