Archive of ‘Library and information science’ category

pop computing

American schools are teaching our kids how to code all wrong

Idit Harel CEO, Globaloria, May 25, 2016

The light and fluffy version of computer science—which is proliferating as a superficial response to the increased need for coders in the workplace—is a phenomenon I refer to as “pop computing.” While calling all policy makers and education leaders to consider “computer science education for all” is a good thing, the coding culture promoted by Code.org and its library of movie-branded coding apps provide quick experiences of drag-and-drop code entertainment.

playing with coding apps as compared to learning to design an app using code. Building an app takes time and requires multi-dimensional learning contexts, pathways and projects.

Computing and computer science is the equivalent of immersing in a thicker study of music—its origins, influences, aesthetics, applications, theories, composition, techniques, variations and meanings. In other words, the actual foundations and experiences that change an individual’s mindset.

As noted by MIT’s Marvin Minsky and Alan Kay, computational innovation and literacy have much in common with music literacy. Just as would-be musicians become proficient by listening improvising and composing, and not just by playing other people’s compositions, so would-be programmers become proficient by designing prototypes and models that work for solving real problems, doing critical thinking and analysis, and creative collaboration—none of which can be accomplished in one hour of coding. In other words, just as a kid playing Guitar Hero wouldn’t be considered a musician, someone playing with coding apps isn’t exactly a coder or computer scientist.

more on coding in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=coding

storytelling and virtual reality

Is storytelling the key to VR’s future?

Virtual reality may be the closest to teleportation we will ever have in our lifetime.

More on virtual reality in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

more on storytelling in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=storytelling

Flipped Classrooms, Blended Learning, and Integrating Technology

PLANNING MEETING – Flipped Classrooms, Blended Learning, and Integrating Technology

Date: Thursday, May 26, 2016
Time: 3:00 – 4:00 PM ET
Presenters: Steve Gilbert  and many more

Description

In this session we will finalize the design of the May 27th & June 24th events. Link to planning document.

Here is a history of our work on this topic:

  • During our March 11th FridayLive! event, Irene Knokh helped us explore the flipped classroom.  There was interest expressed in building a flipped classroom toolkit.
  • On March 17th TLT Members were invited to start this work.
  • On March 24th TLT Members met and decided to create a Flipped/Blended Learning Series.
  • On March 31st the planning continued and the 3 part series has begun to take shape.
  • In April we decided to focus on 2 events.
  • On April 27th we finalized the dates (May 27 and June 24th) and began to design the first session.
  • On May 5th the design work continued
  • On May 11th the design work continued
  • On May 19th the design work continued

big data and the government

What can the government do about big data fairness?

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/05/23/big-data-fairness.aspx

At a Ford Foundation conference dubbed Fairness by Design, officials, academics and advocates discussed how to address the problem of encoding human bias in algorithmic analysis. The White House recently issued a report on the topic to accelerate research into the issue.

The FTC released two studies on how big data is used to segment consumers into profiles and interests.

U.S. CTO Megan Smith said the government has been “creating a seat for these techies,” but that training future generations of data scientists to tackle these issues depends on what we do today. “It’s how did we teach our children?” she said. “Why don’t we teach math and science the way we teach P.E. and art and music and make it fun?”

“Ethics is not just an elective, but some portion of the main core curriculum.”

more on big data in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

Re-conceptualizing Librarianship as a Design Discipline

From ‘Design Thinking’ to ‘Design Knowing’

https://goo.gl/yLrG8l

Rachel Ivy Clarke, Ph.D. (@archivy) discussed the theoretical underpinnings that distinguish design knowledge from scientific knowledge and how it is relevant to research, teaching and practice in librarianship.

Recent years have seen an upsurge of interest in applying “design thinking” to library work, but librarianship also aligns with “design knowing”—foundations of knowledge in design that differentiate it from science.

The Blended Librarians Online Community for the webcast of the session

problem solving – who is doing and how.
how the problem is framed. e.g. is the classification system for the librarians or for the students. or both; a wicked problem

design is not an end product, but an ongoing
iteration. a procedure in which repetition of a sequence of operations yields results successively closer to a desired result
and reflection
in design, reflection is going throughout the entire process.

repertoire is the accumulation but not acknowledged.

rationale – why; critique, constructive, so what – research and education and practice

online risk and teenagers

Researchers: Forget Internet Abstinence; Teens Need some Online Risk

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/16/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/05/16/researchers-forget-internet-abstinence-teens-need-to-face-some-amount-of-online-risk.aspx

My note: after years of imposing Internet filters at schools, “cap” students’ natural curiosity by denying open access to the Internet, etc., this is the first article, which openly defies the bureaucratic / technocratic approach to regulation of the acquisition of knowledge at American schools.

the conclusion from a Pennsylvania State University research project that examined adolescent online safety. This approach includes an important role for teachers as “trusted confidantes” and “educated advisors.”

The results, “Dear Diary: Teens Reflect on Their Weekly Online Risk Experiences,” were published by the Association for Computing Machinery and presented at the organization’s recent Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

“Teens have a strong sense of cost vs. reward, so if we can educate them more clearly on the costs associated with their actions, they may make better decisions on their own,”

digital literacy and the workplace

Digital Literacy and Preparing Students for the Workforce

Posted by Catie Peiper on May 16, 2016

Digital Technology Is Changing the Career Landscape

  1. People are living longer.
  2. Technology can now augment and extend our own abilities.
  3. Daily life is now computational as innovations in sensors and processing make our world a programmable system.
  4. Our new media ecology and advances in communications systems require media literacies beyond text.
  5. Social technologies are driving new forms of production and value creation.
  6. Our world is now globally connected, highlighting diversity and adaptability.

Digital Literacy Is a Professional Competency

media-rich education, including interactive approaches such as digital storytelling or remix education, ensures that students are familiar with modern tools and “natural language” modes of expression. We are increasingly moving into what many scholars consider a post-literate world, one in which images, video, and the written or spoken word are used fluidly together, symbiotically, to communicate increasingly complex concepts. Modern rhetoric now includes TED talks, animated lectures, visual essays, and a plethora of other interactive and dynamic multimedia.

Smart Classrooms = Smart Workers

ten, technology-oriented strengths as “must haves” for future employers:

  1. An ability to determine deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed via all mediums.
  2. An ability to connect with others in a meaningful and direct way via modern technologies and our global networks.
  3. A proficiency in problem-solving and critical analysis, especially when working with digital relationships or data.
  4. An ability to adapt to different cultural settings and modalities, necessitated by our global media ecosystem.
  5. An ability to translate specific information and data into abstracts while understanding the underlying reasoning.
  6. An ability to critically assess and develop content that uses evolving digital media, leveraging these tools for direct and persuasive communication.
  7. A transdisciplinary, multimedia mindset that eschews specialized or localized intelligences.
  8. A design or goal-oriented mindset that employs systems thinking and that develops tasks and work processes towards a desired outcome.
  9. An ability to discriminate and filter both digital and analog information for importance, while maximizing cognitive and productivity efficiencies.
  10. An ability to work productively and innovatively via virtual collaboration.

Digital Backpack, is certainly one of the first steps, as is developing an educational framework within which students can meanfully and productively interrogate our technologically driven world.

To learn more about incorporating media in the classroom, download Digital Literacy On-Demand: Visualizing Best Practices in Higher Education, our guide to best practices for multimodal learning and digital media on campus.

 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

More on digital literacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

faculty and online teaching

Moving beyond smile sheets: A case study on the evaluation and iterative improvement of an online faculty development program

http://patricklowenthal.com/moving-beyond-smile-sheets-case-study-evaluation-iterative-improvement-online-faculty-development-program/

The eCampus Quality Instruction Program (eQIP) is an online faculty development program developed to train faculty in designing and teaching fully online courses.

What is the best way to design and develop high- quality online courses and support faculty as they teach online?

Given faculty’s competing priorities and limited time, we contend that it is important for institutions, and specifically faculty developers, to analyze how much time faculty are spending in online faculty development activities as well as which parts are taking the most (or least) time. (p. 5)

A successful online faculty development program must include pedagogical support, technology support, and design and development support (Baran & Correia, 2014) that overcome obstacles about time, expertise, and motivation of faculty (Henning, 2012).(p. 17)

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

more on online learning in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=online+learning

1 2 3 4 5 51