Archive of ‘student-centered learning’ category

student learning 21st century

AAEEBL/CRA/EPAC INTERNATIONAL WEBINAR: ‘Recognising and presenting student learning in the 21st century’

Monday, March 6, 2017 8:15-9:30 PT USA, 11:15-12:30 ET USA, 16:15-17:30 UK

Register for participation at: https://goo.gl/forms/UZOndFhy36QXQYF42

NOTE: This webinar will be recorded and everyone who registers will receive a link after the event; in other words, for our Australian and New Zealand colleagues, no need to get up in the wee hours of the morning to participate!

Following substantial discussions with colleagues in the US and UK, we are pleased to announce our first collaborative event: Recognising and presenting student learning in the 21st century’: An international webinar on emerging practice in higher education. This session is co-sponsored by the Association for Authentic, Experiential Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL), Centre for Recording Achievement (CRA), and the EPAC ePortfolio Community of Practice.

Description:
It is increasingly recognised that:

  • the learning and achievement of our students is not limited to their academic studies;
  • institutions need to make decisions about the extent to which they wish to recognise and value such ‘lifewide learning’ and achievements as part of the statements they make about the achievements of their graduates;
  • the use of ‘richer records’ of student achievements formatively can support processes of reviewing and planning, and help students set targets and take increasing responsibility for their own development;
  • students may need support in making use of such records with third parties such as potential employers;
  • in a digital world the digital presentation of such records, and the supporting evidence for these, will be increasingly important.

‘Work in progress’ on this agenda is occurring in multiple locations, including the USA (the Comprehensive Student Record project), the UK (the Higher Education Achievement Report), and Australia and New Zealand (the Graduation Statement).

Key contributors to the webinar will be:

  • Cathy Buyarski, IUPUI (Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis) and Helen L. Chen, Stanford University, AAEEBL and EPAC representing their institutional work and that of the broader AACRAO/NASPA Comprehensive Student Record project and national initiatives around emerging credentials in the USA.
  • Rob Ward, Centre for Recording Achievement on the national picture in the UK, with Trish Lunt, University of Liverpool and David Stanbury, University of Essex presenting perspectives on institutional practice.

Each will respond to questions and issues raised, and the webinar will explicitly seek to:

  • identify an agenda for further online discussion if appropriate.
  • stimulate a collection of resources, questions for future exploration, examples, case studies, and also contacts for possible collaboration and networking.

Anyone who is interested in joining this jointly sponsored webinar is welcome to join by pre-registering for the session so that we can send you a participation link. As we look to new ways to innovate and encourage greater engagement and opportunities for networking for AAEEBL members, we welcome both your enthusiasm and patience!

Please register for this event at https://goo.gl/forms/UZOndFhy36QXQYF42 by Friday, March 3..

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more on evidence based learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=Evidence-Based+Learning+
more on eportfolio in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=eportfolio

emotional intelligent leader

6 Proven Ways to Spot an Emotional Intelligent Leader

Directing attention toward where it needs to go is a primal task of leadership.
http://www.inc.com/lolly-daskal/6-proven-ways-to-spot-an-emotional-intelligent-leader.html

1. They have self- awareness. Emotionally intelligent leaders understand their own emotions and know how to manage them. They don’t speak out of frustration or anger; they control their emotions and wait to speak up until their feelings have settled and they have processed their thoughts. They don’t react in the heat of the moment but wait to respond.

2. They respond to criticism and feedback. Every leader faces feedback, some of it negative. Emotionally intelligent leaders don’t become defensive or take it personally. They listen, process, and genuinely consider other points of view, and because they’re always looking to improve, they know how to accept sincere critiques.

3. They know how to generate self-confidence. Emotionally intelligent leaders share a healthy dose of confidence but never cross the line into arrogance. When they don’t understand something, they ask open-ended questions that aim to gather information, not challenge or argue. They know how to give and take in a way that generates confidence.

4. They know the importance of checking their ego.Leaders who have to demonstrate their own importance or value are not yet connected to true leadership or emotional intelligence. Those who are know how to speak and act out of concern of others. They don’t always have to be the center of attention, and they would never take credit for the work of others. Secure in their own abilities, they’re generous and gracious to others.

5. They know how to embody empathy. Leaders with emotional intelligence can put themselves in others’ shoes. They listen with genuine interest and attention and make it a point to understand, then give back in a way that benefits themselves and others. They know how to create win-win situations.

6. They know how to engage with empowerment. The best leaders–the ones with the highest EQs–make it their mission to believe in others and empower them to believe in themselves. Instead of focusing on themselves they know it’s the power of the people that makes leadership successful, so that’s where they focus their efforts.

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more about leadership in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=leadership

audio recording

TwistedWave for Education

TwistedWave is an audio recording and editing tool that is included in Next Vista’s list of recommended tools. Through TwistedWave you can create and edit spoken audio recordings from scratch. Your completed tracks can be exported to Google Drive and SoundCloud.

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more on audio recordings in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=audio+record

Credly Badges on Canvas

Credly Badges Now Available Through Canvas

By Rhea Kelly 01/09/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/09/credly-badges-now-available-through-canvas.aspx

Students can now earn digital badges when they complete modules in Canvas, thanks to a new partnership between Credly and the learning management system from Instructure.

“Digital badges are a powerful and employer-friendly complement to grades and other information traditionally found on a college transcript,” said Brenda Perea, instructional design project manager at Colorado Community College System, which deployed an early pilot of Credly Learning Edition for Canvas.

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more on badges in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

Lenovo VR headset

Lenovo Showcases Affordable VR Headset at CES 2017

By Sri Ravipati 01/05/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/01/05/lenovo-showcases-affordable-vr-headset-at-ces-2017.aspx

Last year at the Windows 10 event, Microsoft announced a slate of upcoming Windows-compatible virtual reality (VR) headsets from Acer, ASUS, Dell, HP and other PC manufacturers that would work without desk- or wall-mounted sensors (similar to its HoloLens device). Lenovo is the first to showcase the prototype for its own self-contained VR headset, which is making its debut this week at the annual International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas.

Lenovo’s prototype headset is compatible with Microsoft’s Windows Holographic platform. Like the HoloLens, its design features depth-sending cameras located on the front of the device, allowing full-room movement tracking.

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

information literacy

Bolkan, J. (2017). Report: Librarians Say Info Literacy Is Important, They Don’t Have the Tools to Teach It -. Retrieved January 9, 2017, from https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/01/05/report-librarians-say-info-literacy-is-important-they-dont-have-the-tools-to-teach-it.aspx
“While a number of respondents believe implementing or improving assessment tools could allow their libraries to better meet users’ information literacy instruction needs, those surveyed already have a number of other ideas on how to achieve this aim,” according to a report on the survey results. “For one, many librarians believe that better integrating information literacy within and across existing curricula would boost their users’ information literacy skills. Similarly, many respondents feel that the answer lies in working more closely with faculty and other instructors — learning about their needs, educating them on the importance of information literacy and the resources the library offers, and encouraging them to include more research-based projects in their coursework.”

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more on information literacy in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=information+literacy

cartoons humor learning

Creating Cartoons to Spark Engagement, Learning

http://www.toondoo.com/

my note:
Avoid using infographics for purposes, which toodoo can serve.
Infographics are for about visualization of stats, not just visualization.
#FindTheRightTool
By Vicki E. Phillips
As instructors, we are constantly looking for new ways to capture our students’ attention and increase their participation in our classes, especially in the online modalities. We spend countless hours crafting weekly announcements for classes and then inevitably receive multiple emails from our students asking the very same questions that we so carefully and completely answered in those very same announcements! The question remains, how do we get them to read our posts?
It was precisely that problem I was trying to solve when I came across several articles touting the benefits of comics in higher education classrooms. I knew I couldn’t create an entire comic book, but I wondered if I could create a content-related cartoon that would not only capture students’ attention and maybe make them laugh, but also interest them enough that they would read the entire announcement or post. In doing so, I would be freed from responding to dozens of emails asking the same questions outlined in the announcements and students could focus on the homework.
A quick Internet search led me to a plethora of free “click and drag” cartoon making software applications to try. I started posting my own cartoons on characters, themes, etc. on the weekly literature we were studying in my upper division American and Contemporary World Literature classes, as well as to offer reminders or a few words of encouragement. Here’s an example of one I posted during week 7 of the semester when students can become discouraged with their assignment load: http://www.toondoo.com/cartoon/10115361
After a positive response, I decided to provide my online students the opportunity to try their hand at cartoon creation. I created a rubric and a set of instructions for an easy to use, free program that I had used, and I opened up the “cartoon challenge” to the students. The results were nothing short of amazing—what intrigued me the most was the time and effort they took with their cartoons. Not only did they create cartoons on the story we were reading, but they also wrote additional posts explaining their ideas for the creation, discussing why they chose a particular scene, and identifying those elements pertinent to the points they were making. These posts tended to receive many more substantial comments from their peers than the traditional discussion board posts, indicating they were being read more.
When students in my face-to-face course heard about the cartoons, they asked to try this approach as well. Their cartoons, shared in class via the overhead projector, led to some of the most engaging and interesting discussions I have ever had in the residential literature classes as students explained how they came up with the elements they chose, and why they picked a certain scene from the reading. The positive student feedback has been instrumental in my continuing to offer this option in both my online and face-to-face classes.
How does one get started in making these cartoons? The good news is you do not have to be an artist to make a cartoon! There are free programs with templates, clip art, and all the elements you would need to click and drag into place all those wonderful ideas you have simmering in your brain. My favorite to use is ToonDoo, available at http://toondoo.com. I like it because there are literally hundreds of elements, a search bar, and it lets me customize what I want to say in the dialog bubbles. It is very user friendly, even for those of us with limited artistic ability.
The whole experience has been overwhelmingly positive for me, and judging from the feedback received, for the students as well. It has also reminded me of one of my teaching goals, which is to incorporate more activities which would fall under assimilating and creating aspects of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, 2001). If that is your goal as well, then try inserting a cartoon in those weekly announcements and ask for feedback from your students—I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!
References:
Armstrong, Patricia (n.d.) Bloom’s Taxonomy, Vanderbilt University, Center for Teaching. Retrieved from https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/#2001
Pappas, Christopher (2014) The 5 Best Free Cartoon Making Programs for Teachers. Retrieved from: https://elearningindustry.com/the-5-best-free-cartoon-making-tools-for-teachers
Vicki E. Phillips is an assistant professor of English and Literature at Rasmussen College, Ocala, Fla.

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more on effective presentations in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=presentations

more on create infographics in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/04/09/infographics-how-to-create-them/

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