Archive of ‘student-centered learning’ category

Higher Ed Falls Short

Report: Americans Value College Degrees But Say Higher Ed Falls Short on Delivering Promises

By Sri Ravipati  05/12/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/12/americans-value-college-degrees-but-say-higher-ed-falls-short-on-delivering-promises.aspx

new survey, “Varying Degrees: New America’s Annual Survey on Higher Education,” which involved more than 1,600 individuals in the United States who are ages 18 and older.

explore the data using an interactive tool

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data reveal key differences across categories of age, gender, generation, region, socioeconomic status, race and political ideology

 

  • Most respondents want to see changes made in higher ed, with just 25 percent answering the system is “just fine the way it is” and helps students succeed;
  • Students want additional help crossing the finish line, with 57 percent of respondents answering that higher ed institutions should help students succeed;
  • Just one in three respondents answered that the federal government is having a positive impact on higher ed;
  • Two-year colleges and four-year public universities are seen as especially worth the cost compared to other institution types, with 83 percent and 79 percent of respondents respectively saying these institution types “contribute to a strong American workforce”

“Although people believe in higher education generally, they are not satisfied with specific institutions and policies that we have in place right now — they are broadly dissatisfied,”

 

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more on education and employment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=education+employment

young vs old millennials

Don’t Call Me a Millennial — I’m an Old Millennial

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the Census Bureau’s definition (born 1982–2000) or Pew’s (about 1981–1997).

In 2015, for example, Juliet Lapidos — born the same year I was — may have put it best in a column for the New York Times headlined “Wait, What, I’m a Millennial?” “I don’t identify with the kids that Time magazine described as technology-addled narcissists, the Justin Bieber fans who ‘boomerang’ back home instead of growing up,” she writes.

Old Millennials, as I’ll call them, who were born around 1988 or earlier (meaning they’re 29 and older today), really have lived substantively different lives than Young Millennials, who were born around 1989 or later, as a result of two epochal events that occurred around the time when members of the older group were mostly young adults and when members of the younger were mostly early adolescents: the financial crisis and smartphones’ profound takeover of society. And according to Jean Twenge, a social psychologist at San Diego State University and the author of Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitledand More Miserable Than Ever Before, there’s some early, emerging evidence that, in certain ways, these two groups act like different, self-contained generations.

Millennials, we hear over and over again, are absolutely obsessed with social media, and live their entire social lives through their smartphones. I tweet too much, sure, but I’ve never blasted a ’gram (did I say that right?); even thinking about learning how to Snapchat makes me want to take a long, peaceful nap

“The Job-Hopping Generation,” says Gallup — and are much more likely, relative to previous generations when they were in their 20s, to live at home and to put off family formation for a long time.

last week Pew released some numbers suggesting millennials aren’t any job-hoppier than Generation X was at the same age.

young vs old millennials

TPR presentation

Presentation to TPR (Technology and Pedagogy Roundtable), April 19, 2017
WSB 335 | short link: http://tinyurl.com/tprIMS

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I am faculty (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/) with InforMedia Services (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/free-tech-instruction/):

https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/
https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc
https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760

Through the years, I am working with the application of educational technologies in the curriculum process.

During my work and research, I notice an important discussion in the community of higher education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/04/03/use-of-laptops-in-the-classroom/

The topic of the use of electronic devices, being that laptops, and more recently smartphones, tablets 2in1 laptops (or hybrid laptops) has been a disputable issue among instructors.

Under the tutelage of TPR, I am offering to facilitate a campus-wide discussion on the use of electronic devices in the classroom. The short-range goal of such discussion is to provide a platform for SCSU instructors to share their pedagogical experience in handling the use of electronic devices in the classroom.

The long-range goal of such discussion will be to start a conversation among SCSU faculty about the didactic of educational technology; going beyond just learning technology and start building practices for successful use of technology for teaching and learning.

 

WebVR experiments

Google Cardboard Users Can Now Play WebVR Experiments

By Sri Ravipati  04/13/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/04/13/google-cardboard-users-can-now-play-webvr-experiments.aspx

In February, Google added WebVR to Chrome on Daydream-ready phones (like Pixel and ZenFone). The WebVR standard allows users to view virtual reality (VR) experiences in a browser like Chrome by simply tapping a link and putting on a compatible headset. Yesterday, the company revealed it added support for Google Cardboard and launched a new homepage for web-based VR experiments.

WebVR support on Chrome for Oculus Rift and HTC Vive is “coming soon.”

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more on Google Cardboard in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=cardboard

games teach thinking skills

SCHOOL USES VIDEO GAMES TO TEACH THINKING SKILLS


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More on gaming and education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

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