Posts Tagged ‘edad’

The death of the digital native and overselling the ed tech

The death of the digital native: four provocations from Digifest speaker, Dr Donna Lanclos

https://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform-feature/the-death-of-the-digital-native-23-feb-2016

educators need to figure out what they need to do. Are you trying to have a conversation? Are you simply trying to transmit information? Or are you, in fact, trying to have students create something?

Answer those pedagogical questions first and then – and only then – will you be able to connect people to the kinds of technologies that can do that thing.

The ‘digital native’ is a generational metaphor. It’s a linguistic metaphor. It’s a ridiculous metaphor. It’s the notion that there is a particular generation of people who are fundamentally unknowable and incomprehensible.

There are policy implications: if your university philosophy is grounded in assumptions around digital natives, education and technology, you’re presupposing you don’t have to teach the students how to use tech for their education. And, furthermore, it will never be possible to teach that faculty how to use that technology, either on their own behalf or for their students.

A very different paradigm is ‘visitor and resident‘. Instead of talking about these essentialised categories of native and immigrant, we should be talking about modes of behaviour because, in fact, some people do an awful lot of stuff with technology in some parts of their lives and then not so much in other parts.

How much of your university practice is behind closed doors?   This is traditional, of course, gatekeeping our institutions of higher education, keeping the gates in the walled campuses closed. So much of the pedagogy as well as the content of the university is locked away. That has implications not just for potential students but also from a policy perspective – if part of the problem in higher education policy is of non-university people not understanding the work of the university, being open would have really great potential to mitigate that lack of understanding.

 I would like to see our universities modelling themselves more closely on what we should be looking for in society generally: networked, open, transparent, providing the opportunity for people to create things that they wouldn’t create all by themselves.

I understand the rationale for gatekeeping, I just don’t think that there’s as much potential with a gatekept system as there is with an open one.

There are two huge problems with the notion of “student expectations”: firstly, the sense that, with the UK’s new fee model, students’ ideas of what higher education should be now weigh much more heavily in the institutions’ educational planning. Secondly, institutions in part think their role is to make their students “employable” because some politician somewhere has said the university is there to get them jobs.

Students coming into higher education don’t know much about what higher education can be. So if we allow student expectations to set the standard for what we should be doing, we create an amazingly low bar.

The point of any educational system is not to provide citizens with jobs. That’s the role of the economy.

Universities are not vocational

Institutions can approach educational technology in two very different ways. They can have a learning technology division that is basically in charge of acquiring and maintaining educational technology. Or they can provide spaces to develop pedagogy and then think about the role of technology within that pedagogy.

 

badges for teachers

start with the teachers, not with the students

OPINION So You Want to Drive Instruction With Digital Badges? Start With the Teachers

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2015-10-31-so-you-want-to-drive-instruction-with-digital-badges-start-with-the-teachers

Participating teachers advance through a series of inquiry-based professional development modules. Teachers are awarded a digital badge for the successful completion of each 10-hour module. To accomplish this, they must complete the following steps: 1) study module content, 2) participate in a focused discussion with peers working on the same module, 3) create an original inquiry-based global lesson plan that incorporates new learning, 4) implement the original lesson plan in the classroom, 5) provide evidence of classroom implementation and 6) reflect on and revise the lesson created.

The final product of every module is a tested, global lesson plan that articulates learning objectives, activities, assessments, and resources for each stage of inquiry. Upon completion, teachers may publish finalized lessons in a resource library where they can be accessed by other educators. As designed, the HISD badging system will be a four-year, 16-badge approach that equates to 160 hours of professional learning for teachers.

five key features that taken together increase significantly the likelihood that the learning experience for a teacher will lead to results in the classroom for students — which, after all, is the point of professional development:

 

  • Badging requires demonstrating understanding and implementation of a target content or skill. 
  • Badging provides recognition and motivation. 
  • Badging allows for knowledge circulation among teachers. 
  • Badging can be tracked and assessed. 
  • Badging is a scalable enterprise. 

 

Bloom Digital Taxonomy

Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy Cheat Sheet for Teachers

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2016/02/blooms-digital-taxonomy-cheat-sheet-for-teachers.html

Resources for Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy
iPad Apps Android Apps Web Tools
Creating
Evaluating
Analyzing
Applying
Understanding
Remembering

Follow the discussion on the LinkedIn ISTE discussion group:

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/2811/2811-6107212405878566913

Similar visual representation in this IMS blog entry:

Bloom’s Wheel With Technology

digital literacy for EDAD

one-credit courses on digital literacy offered for the School of Education department for Educational Leadership

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EDAD 697Introduction to Educational Technology

1 credit, summer 2016

Technology forecast for education: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/27/4710/

Course Description

This synchronous online course will introduce school administrators to the multitude and complexity of educational technology issues. Through group discussions and exercises, the course will focus on the development of knowledge, skills and depositions to effective professional practice in educational leadership. The goal of the course is to develop knowledge and understanding of appropriate application of technology in the teaching and learning process and in the management of educational programs.
Information and experience in the course will include review of the latest trends in technology. Familiarity to acquisition of expertise will be sought in understand and use of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0, as well as social media, multimedia and interactivity and how it affects school life as well as the role of the educational leader. Specific attention will be paid to the importance and ability to develop and maintain policies, which reflect the ever-changing world of technology. Auxiliary, but no less important issues such as legal issues, copyright issues, ethics and other forms of digital citizenship will be discussed.

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course the student will:

Course Objective Knowledge Skill Disposition Impact
1.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of related technologies appropriate to the management of a school # o o
2.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of related technologies appropriate to the instructional program of a school # o o
3.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of various types of related technologies for supporting the instructional program of the school # o o
4.      Demonstrate knowledge of planning and management procedures and policies for the appropriate use of technological resources to serve the mission of the school # o o
5.      Demonstrate knowledge of common computer and related technological applications # o o
6.      Identify gender & diversity issues related to technology in education o o o
7.      Demonstrate knowledge of adaptive technology devices for individuals with special needs o o o o
8.      Demonstrate skill in the use of technology for materials preparation, presentations, record keeping, computation, communication, information / data collection and management, and the effective use of the Internet o o o
9.      Demonstrate an understanding of legal issues, including copyright issues, related to educational technology o o
10.  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of ethical practice in the use of technology o o
11.  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of administrative policies and procedures that promote appropriate utilization of technology by school personnel o o o
12.  Demonstrate familiarity with appropriate professional standards related to educational leadership and technology o o o o
13.  Demonstrate an understanding of the digital age learning culture, digital citizenship in particular o o

 

# http://ed.mnsu.edu/edleadership/docs/license_competencies/K-12_Principal_Competencies_revised_8_22_08.pdf

National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators.

http://www.iste.org/standards/ISTE-standards/standards-for-administrators

Demonstrate familiarity with appropriate professional standards related to educational leadership and technology
http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2015/ProfessionalStandardsforEducationalLeaders2015forNPBEAFINAL.pdf

Resources On Line

IMS Technology blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: #edtech ; #edtechchat ; #edtechUK; @Edtech_K12

Facebook: #edtech ;  #edleadership

Pinterest #edtech; #edleadership ; #edtechleadership

Agency for Instructional Technology             http://www.ait.net

Center for Technology and Teacher Education            http://www.teacherlink.org

Center for Children and Technology            http://www.edc.org/CCT/

T.H.E. Journal (Technology Horizons in Education Online Journal)            http://www.thejournal.com

Cybertimes Navigator (New York Times) http://www.nytimes.com/navigator

International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)            http://cnets.iste.org/

Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA)   http://cnets.iste.org/tssa

ISTE curriculum and Content Area Standards   http://Cnets.iste.org/currstands/

Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to use Technology (PT3)              http://www.pt3.org

Assistive Technology information:  http://www.abilityhub.com  http://www.enablemart.com

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EDAD ??? Technology and Curriculum Design

1 credit, Summer 2016

Course Description

This course seeks hands-on experience in integration of educational technology into the classroom. Students will learn to select opportunities for application [or not] of technology in education. The course will provide a hands-on experience for educational leaders to understand the application of technology in the curriculum process. Topics of consideration include instructional design, media and formats, devices, telecommunications and social interactivity. The course will provide an opportunity to apply technology knowledge and experience in hands-on exercises for curriculum management as well as monitoring student achievement progress. Further discussions and practical approach will include modern, effective and efficient ways of communications among parents, students, faculty and administration. The course offered in synchronous online mode and F2F mode.

Objectives/Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course the student will:

  1. Understand the impact of technology on the teaching and learning process.
  2. Understand the principles of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and National Educational Standards for Students (NETS*S) and their application in the curriculum process.
  3. Research and assess the opportunities for technology to be integrated in the classroom.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl

The ISTE National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•T) and

Performance Indicators for Teachers

https://www.kent.edu/sites/default/files/file/ISTEstandards.pdf

 

EDAD ??? Technology as an Integral Part of Successful Educational Leadership

1 credit, Summer 2016

Course Description

Course Description

This class will support teacher leaders and school administrators in reviewing and systematizing the fast aspects of modern electronic technologies. Based on a foundational better understanding of how technologies work, future educational leaders will develop skills and practice the application of ideas, tactics and methods for better integration of technologies in the teaching and learning process as well as the creation of better policies and procedures.

The course is designed to bring research and analytical skills and build structure in the process of resolving technology issues, which educational leaders face in modern schools, including hardware and software problems, networks and computers, curriculum and teaching and learning methods.

The course will offer discussions as well as practical solutions such as social media (e.g. Twitter) for professional development, online tools for teacher evaluation, online tools for collaboration and creativity, immediate and future trends, which already impact education and educational leadership.
The course offered in synchronous online mode and F2F mode.

Objectives/Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to identify and update sources for information to keep current their technology knowledge
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of technology leadership standards.
  3. Student will demonstrate an understanding of how to create, promote, and sustain a dynamic, digital – age learning culture that provides a rigorous, relevant, and engaging education for all students.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding of how to promote an environment of professional learning and innovation that empowers educators to enhance student learning through the infusion of contemporary technologies and digital resources.
  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how to provide digital – age leadership and management to continuously improve the organization through the effective use of information and technology resources.
  6. Students will understand and apply knowledge of how to model and facilitate understanding of social, ethical and legal issues and responsibilities related to an evolving digital culture.
  7. Students will demonstrate knowledge of technology as integral part of facilities and resource management
  8. Students will be able to describe and use budget planning and management procedures related to educational computing and technology.
  9. Students will be able to describe and maintain current information involving facilities planning issues related to computers and related technologies.
  10. Students will be able to design and develop policies and procedures concerning staffing, scheduling, and security for managing computers/technology in a variety of instructional and administrative school

Of Mice and Men: iPads, smartboards and how we acquire technology for education

in the latest news about scandals regarding technology acquisition for schools, it is only fair to ask ourselves:
how much involved do we WANT/NEED to be in the decision making process regarding such timely issue.
How much do we need to educate ourselves on 1. technology? 2. application of technology in education? compatible choices of technology, including performance, prices and brands? Do we discuss such issues or just let people above us and/or elected by us make the choices? What is your opinion?

What is your opinion about open source and alternative mobile devices?

The LA School iPad Scandal: What You Need To Know

http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/08/27/343549939/the-l-a-school-ipad-scandal-what-you-need-to-know

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