Archive of ‘learning’ category

China AI and math

https://nationalinterest.org/feature/why-chinas-race-ai-dominance-depends-math-163809Why China’s Race For AI Dominance Depends On Math | Forget about “AI” itself: it’s all about the math, and America is failing to train enough citizens in the right kinds of mathematics to remain dominant. from r/technology

https://nationalinterest.org/feature/why-chinas-race-ai-dominance-depends-math-163809

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more on CHina in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=china

brain activity study

Duke University researchers say every brain activity study you’ve ever read is wrong

https://www.fastcompany.com/90520750/duke-university-researchers-say-every-brain-activity-study-youve-ever-read-is-wrong

The researchers reexamined 56 peer-reviewed, published papers that conducted 90 fMRI experiments, some by leaders in the field, and also looked at the results of so-called “test/retest” fMRIs, where 65 subjects were asked to do the same tasks months apart. They found that of seven measures of brain function, none had consistent readings.

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more on the brain in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=brain

Mobbing in the library workplace

Mobbing in the library workplace: What it is and how to prevent it

a darker definition of mobbing: a type of workplace pathology in which employees target a co-worker and engage in an ongoing campaign of disrespectful, and even hostile, behavior. Typically, mobbing behaviors are covert and insidious; the mobbing victim is excluded from normal workplace activities and communications, with the ultimate goal of forcing the victim out of the organization. Mobbing is highly stressful because the targeted individual’s social support system is undermined.
Managers may be tacit or active participants in the process. The perpetrated injustices are unfair but usually legal, and may fall within areas that are considered management prerogatives.
Often, mobbing victims are made to appear as though they are at fault, or are viewed as “crazy” or incompetent. When forced from the work group, their departure is depicted as their choice.
The concept of mobbing is not well recognized in the United States. In English speaking countries, research has focused on the concept of bullying behavior between individuals, often when a person in a more powerful position is abusive toward a subordinate or less assertive person. Mobbing, with its overlay of group dynamics, is a more sophisticated and complex set of behaviors. Mobbing is clearly a form of harassment, but in the United States this term is connected with civil rights law, and denotes harmful behavior toward persons who have a protected status, such as race, religion, gender, or national origin.
Research by Leymann and Kenneth Westhues shows that mobbing is more likely to occur in professional settings, where the work is complex, organizational goals may be ambiguous, critical thinking is encouraged, and workers have relative autonomy. Academic libraries share some or all of these characteristics, and in fact libraries can be prime settings for workplace mobbing.
Active, involved management is crucial in controlling the mobbing dynamic. Many library managers have limited management training, and may not have awareness of the concept of mobbing or experience with resolving conflict. Managers are often promoted for their technical expertise, rather than their skill in handling interpersonal matters.
 A weak, poorly managed organization may provide the aggressor with opportunities to target an individual.

Google EdTech

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-07-01-google-parts-ways-with-longtime-education-evangelist-jaime-casap

In April 2020, the company claimed its G Suite for Education products were used by 120 million students and users across the world. More than 100 million use Classroom, its online collaboration and learning management platform. Over 40 million students and educators across the globe now use Chromebooks.

Google

 

https://www.youtube.com/c/JaimeCasap/videos

ADDIE and SAM models

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/603803423583693/

Corinne Hyde

Anyone in here teach instructional design that can recommend a textbook that teaches ADDIE or SAM but is inclusive and has an emphasis on instruction being culturally responsive or culturally sustaining?

Glenn Singley

https://community.articulate.com/articles/an-introduction-to-sam-for-instructional-designers

The ADDIE model of instructional design is probably the most well-known approach for crafting learning solutions. ADDIE stands for Analyze, Design, Development, Implement, and Evaluate. But ADDIE isn’t the only game in town these days. One popular alternative to ADDIE is SAM, which stands for Successive Approximation Model.

Created by Allen Interactions, SAM offers an instructional design approach consisting of repeated small steps, or iterations, that are intended to address some of the most common instructional design pain points, like meeting timelines, staying on budget, and collaborating with Subject Matter Experts

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more on ADDIE in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=addie+model

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=SAMR

bio lab in emergency teaching

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/599387467358622/

Hi everyone- my mom has been teaching Bio 101 with a lab for 39 years. I’m working with her to get ready for the fall semester online but Science isn’t my field. Any recommendations for online bio labs?

Stephanie Edelmann I’m still working on my lab, but here is an extensive list of online resources that was shared with faculty at our school.

https://docs.google.com/…/1Mv0EyCw2QeFIpW5P5qNR5EW…/edit

Rebecca Westphal Carolina has kits…. but they are mostly on back order and hard to get for fall (in US?). You could think of putting together your own kits for students to pick up. There are also many labs using “household” materials such as this spinach photosynthesis lab http://www2.nau.edu/…/photosynthesis/photosynthesis.html.

For introducing basic chemistry I really like the “Build an Atom” simulation on the PhET website, although it’s more of an activity than a “lab”. HHMI biointeractive has lots of free resources and data sets that you could build on, including lots for natural selection — try searching “rock pocket mouse natural selection” on the biointeractive website.

Rachel Scherer https://phet.colorado.edu/_m/ is one of my go to favorites. I have some instructors testing labster out this summer. I haven’t heard anything back so I am guessing it is working well for them. Also

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/18iVSIeOqKjj58xcR8dYJS5rYvzZ4X1UGLWhl3brRzCM/htmlview?fbclid=IwAR2h4vyLqHtXW6M80CXTHZ4eUrv-TY8ljCMMZ52zMRGCqqgxwNt6Qq8zpF0#gid=0

Cheryl DeWyer Lindeman https://www.biointeractive.org

Cheryl DeWyer Lindeman https://www.shapeoflife.org/

Sondra LoRe https://qubeshub.org/community/groups/quant_bio_online

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more on emergency teaching in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=emergency+teaching

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