Archive of ‘pinterest’ category

psychology of social networks

The Blogger’s Guide To Understanding The Psychology Of Social Networks

Last Updated: By

http://www.bloggingwizard.com/psychology-of-social-networks/

Social media is eating the world.

Facebook alone has over 1.5 billion users – nearly 50% of the entire internet’s population.

Throw in LinkedIn, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and region specific social networks like Vkontakte and Sina Weibo and WeChat, and you’d be hard pressed to find anyone who’s online but isn’t on social media.

What has led to the rise of these social networks? What kind of people do they attract?

What is their psychology? What kind of content do they like to consume? And most importantly for bloggers and marketers – what works, what doesn’t on social media?

Facebook has become the ‘home base’ for most people online. While they may or may not use other networks, a majority maintain a presence on Facebook.

  • Popular: Used by 72% of all adult internet users in America.
  • More women users: 77% of online female users are on Facebook.
  • Younger audience: 82% of all online users between 18-29 are on Facebook
  • USA (14%), India (9%) and Brazil (7%) form the three largest markets.

Twitter’s quick flowing ‘info stream’ attracts an audience that swings younger and is mostly urban/semi-urban.

  • Younger: Used by 37% of all online users between 18 and 29.
  • Educated: 54% of users have either graduated college, or have some college experience.
  • Richer: 54% of online adults who make over $50,000+ are on Twitter.

nstagram recently overtook Twitter to become the second largest social network. Pew estimates that 26% of all online adults are on Instagram in the US.

  • More women than men: 29% of all online women are on Instagram, vs. only 22% of all men.
  • Overwhelmingly younger: 53% of all 18-29 year olds are on Instagram.
  • Less educated: Only 24% of Instagram users are college graduates, while 31% have some college experience – fitting since its audience is largely younger.

Google+ is a mysterious beast. It is ubiquitous, yet doesn’t attract nearly a tenth of the attention as Instagram or Facebook. Some marketers swear by it, while others are busy proclaiming its death.

  • More male: 24% of all online men are active users of Google+. For women, this number is 20%.
  • Younger users: 27% of all 16-24 year olds online are active members of Google+. In contrast, only 18% and 14% of 45-54 and 55-64 year olds are active on Google+ at the moment.
  • Large non-US user base: Only 55% of Google+ users are American. 18% are Indian and 6% are Brazilian. One reason for this international user base is Android’s popularity outside the US (since Google+ is baked right into Android).
  • Even income distribution: According to GlobalWebIndex.net, 22% of people in bottom 25% of income earners are on Google+. For the top 25% of income earners, this number is 24%, while for the mid 50% earners, this number is 23%. This means that nearly all levels of income earners are nearly equally represented on Google+.

Pinterest’s visual nature makes it a fantastic marketing tool for B2C businesses. And it’s got the potential to drive a large amount of traffic to your blog if you have a solid strategy.

Here’s what you should know about Pinterest demographics:

  • Overwhelmingly female: 42% of all online female users are on Pinterest, vs. only 13% of men.
  • Older audience: 72% of Pinterest’s audience are 30 years or older. Only 34% are between 18 and 29. Significantly, 17% are over 65 years old.
  • Distinctly suburban: Suburban and rural users form the largest share – 29% and 30% respectively. This is distinctly different from other networks where urban users rule.
  • Higher income: Given the higher average age, Pinterest users also have higher disposable income, with 64% of all adults making $50,000+ on Pinterest.

The professional networking site LinkedIn attracts an older audience that is largely urban, wealthier, and more educated.

  • Older: Only 23% of users are between 18-29 years old. 21% are over 65 years, and 31% are between 30 and 49 years of age.
  • Urban: Very limited number of rural users – only 14%. 61% are either urban or suburban.
  • Wealthier: 75% of users earn over $50,000.
  • Highly educated: 50% of LinkedIn users are college graduates. Another 22% have some college experience.

Snapchat is the newest social networks on this list, but also one of the fastest growing. Here’s what you need to know about its demographics:

  • Dominated by women: 70% of Snapchat’s users are females.
  • Overwhelmingly young: 71% of users are younger than 25.
  • Limited income: 62% earn under $50,000 – fitting given the average age of Snapchat’s users.

ere’s what you should take away from all these stats:

  • If you’re targeting younger users, stick to Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat.
  • If you’re targeting women with disposable income, head over to Pinterest.
  • For professionals with better education and income, use LinkedIn.
  • For everyone, go with Facebook.

The psychology of social media users

Facebook is a ‘closed’ network where your friends list will usually be limited to family, friends and acquaintances you’ve met in real life. Privacy is a big concern for Facebook’s users, and all posts are private by default.

This ultimately affects the way users interact with each other and with businesses on Facebook.

According to a Pew Internet study:

  • Facebook users are more trusting (since the network is closed).
  • Facebook users have more close relationships. Pew found that heavy users of the platform are more likely to have a higher number of close relationships.
  • Facebook users are politically engaged and active.

To understand why people share or follow on Twitter, researchers at Georgia Tech and UMichigan analysed over 500M tweets over 15-months. They found that the three biggest reasons why people share/follow on Twitter are:

  • Network overlap: Your network is similar to your followers’ network.
  • User tweet-RT ratio: The number of tweets vs. the number of RTs for a user.
  • Informational content: The more informative the content, the better.

As per one study, a person’s Pinterest boards represent his/her “ideal self”. That is, it is a representation of everything the user would want to be or have. This is in opposition to Facebook that represents the user’s “real self”.

keep the following in mind:

  • Instead of marketing yourself on every network, pick the network whose demographics matches your target audience’s.
  • Positivity always wins – unless you’re deliberately trying to create controversy (not a good option for most non-media businesses).
  • Rules of content: Informative content on Twitter and LinkedIn, aspirational content on Instagram and Pinterest, fun/positive/uplifting content on Facebook.

+++++++++++++++++++
more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

social media 2017

more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

latest in social media

+++++++++++++++++
more on social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media

digital literacy in the NHR 2016

The New Horizon Report, 2016

http://www.nmc.org/nmc-horizon-news/nmc-launches-app-for-the-2016-nmc-horizon-report/

page 24. Improving Digital Literacy

For years educators have leveraged curation tools such as Scoop.it, Storify, and Pinterest to help students critically evaluate online resources.
 (my bold to emphasize the difference between the definition of digital literacy, which I am fighting to establish at SCSU LRS and the continuous “information literacy” trend of the reference librarians )
Mapping Digital Literacy Policy and Practice in the Canadian Landscape
http://mediasmarts.ca/research-policy/mapping-digital-literacy-policy-practice-canadian-education-landscape

A well-rounded digital literacy incorporates print literacy but adds new capacities, competencies and comportments into the mix. Now included is the technical know-how to create a website, produce and upload a video, edit an image, design a functional information architecture for accessing or sharing knowledge – as well as many “soft skills” such as critical thinking and ethical behaviour. One of the primary transformations of the digital era in the 21st Century has been the introduction of end-users as actors in the world of communication, autonomous (producers and consumers of information) who can access and disseminate content in Web 2.0 domains without the regulatory controls of traditional filters and gatekeepers. Given this development, end-users now need greater critical thinking capacities to manage content: to decide what is valid and truthful and be able to incorporate multiple perspectives and voices into expanding worldviews. Additionally, exhibiting ethical behaviour in what may be said or posted online is essential to contemporary civic mindedness whether in a local context or the broader global village.

Getting Started: Multimedia Literacy

http://guides.lib.udel.edu/multimedia

Multimedia literacy is the set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create multimedia.

http://www.deakin.edu.au/library/teach/digital-literacy/elements-of-digital-literacy – too simplistic, too traditional, no significant departure from the conservative information literacy

More on digital literacy in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

social media and libraries

Use of social media by the library current practices and future opportunities (White Paper)

http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/access/white-paper-social-media.pdf

#tfsocialmedia

Social media objectives:

  •  promotion
  •  collection management tool
  • Outreach
  •  teaching and learning

Opportunities and challenges

  • opportunity to build a sense of community between the library and its users
  • the variability of skills across library staff for using social media effectively, striking the right tone between professional and personal, coordinating activities across the institution to avoid duplication
  • maintaining visibility for the library brand and copyright issues relating to hosting library resources on social media sites

Policies and management:

  • Librarians are divided on the benefits of introducing formalized social media policies and plans. About a third of libraries responding to the Taylor & Francis survey had a policy in place, but over 40% had no plans to introduce one
  • Some believe that representing the library as a professional function with a
    consistent tone is the priority, while others believe that a more human approach is important, with individual staff free to bring their own ideas and personalities to social media activities.

Effectiveness and assessment:

  • difficult to prove return on effort and that the time required to do this was a major barrier to more comprehensive analysis of impact
  • framework for evaluation, so it is likely that assessment against commonly agreed metrics will become an increasingly important part of social media activity within the library in the near future

Current Social Media Practices:

  • In a study from the mid 2000s (Cantrell and Havens1 ), most library directors in the US when questioned about social media said they did not think that libraries had a role in social networking
  • A more recent study from 2012 (Kai-Wah Chu and Du4) shows how use of social media by the library has now become mainstream. In this survey of libraries in Asia, North America and Europe, 71% were found to be using social media tools with a further 13% saying they planned to use them

Advantages of using social media

n Financially the costs of using social media are perceived to be low;
n It requires little training;
n It promotes library services and disseminates news quickly, delivering this information more directly to library users;
n It increases engagement and interactions with library users;
n It helps gather feedback to enhance user services;
n The promotion of library holdings via social media can help increase usage of content;
n It enhances communication both within the library and with other departments;
n It can be used for outreach activities through onward sharing, well beyond the institution itself, helping build connections and reputation more broadly

Social Media Objectives: graph on page 8 of the PDF document:

A To promote events
B To promote library services
C To promote resources/collections at the library
D To update on library refurbishments
E To promote new acquisitions
F To promote library guides, exhibition guides
G To connect with new students joining the university
H To engage with the academic community
I To connect with the wider community beyond the university e.g. the town in which the institution is based
J To connect with distance learners
K As a customer services tool- complaints, suggestions, enquiries, feedback

L To highlight subject specific information
M To connect with potential students
N As a teaching tool to promote information literacy, technology and writing tips (not library based)
O To promote courses
P As a research tool to locate official documents and studies

From UK-based focus group: “The library is a programme, not just a building.

Channel preferences: Graph on page 10 of the PDF document

SOCIAL MEDIA USES Table on p 13 of the PDF document
Twitter n Distribute library news and information
n Provide customer service
n Build connections with researchers
n Build connections with other librarians and institutions
Facebook n Distribute library news and information
n More social and less formal than Twitter – share photographs and run competitions
n Arrange events including tracking RSVPs and sending event updates
n Engagement with students
Pinterest n Promote general library collections, digital and archive special collections and information literacy
n Set up of online repositories for students to pin researched references as part of
collaborative group work
n Display book titles to save time browsing and promote new titles
n Provide an arena for students and course leaders to pin reviewed and recommended reading
for a particular topic
n Develop communities with other online libraries
YouTube n Streaming film collections
n Instructional ‘how to’ videos teaching information literacy skills and how to use library
services and resources
There are also a number of other social media products that are being used by librarians that reflect regional
preferences and the need for the specific functions offered by niche applications.

Collection usage and discovery: Graph on p. 15

Teaching and learning

From US-based librarian interview: “The trend in education now is to create environments that foster collaborative learning. Faculty have ditched textbooks and course management systems in exchange for a Facebook page for their class, or a wiki, or a blog. These online environments are fun; students already know how to use them and are more motivated to comment, discuss and share in these environments than a dry CMS.”

Social media policies and management, p. 18

73% of respondents stating that they believed more roles dedicated to social media would appear in the library in the future.

Effectiveness of social media

From UK focus group: “We keep track of something particularly successful, then we redo the campaign 6 months later.”

From US focus group: “We have very few interactions with anyone on our Twitter feed.”
“Twitter is definitely the best platform, because we hashtag all of our posts with the keyword
of the publication, and so for the academic audience, once they click it’s going to pull up all
of the similar publications under that topic.

Promoting library social media channels

From UK focus group:
“We retweet each other to encourage new followers.” My note: Suggested by me regarding SCSU_Library for Twitter and Pinterest and SCSUTechinstruct but “considered” (in local lingo, slow death of the idea)

teens iPhones and Facebook

Teens love iPhone more, use Facebook a lot less, says survey

http://www.cnet.com/news/teens-love-iphone-more-than-ever-but-iwatch-doesnt-excite/

When it comes to social networks, teens are even more committed to Instagram. But the most stunning statistic was that Facebook seems to be rapidly disappearing from teen’s lives. In April, 72 percent said they used the site. Now, a mere 45 percent admitted to it.

Pinterest and Instagram

Not Lost in Translation: Brands on Pinterest and Instagram

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140922151604-12214927-not-lost-in-translation-brands-on-pinterest-and-instagram

the ability of anyone, with internet access, to communicate instantaneously to a global network

n the world of Instagram and Pinterest, brands are equal opportunity participants with consumers. Brands create stories that entice and capture consumers’ attention to leverage their influence. Users interact with the brand by commenting, liking, or ignoring. In an instant, you know if you have a hit or a dud. When something is a hit, it is popular, but more importantly, it becomes influential. The relationship between brands and consumers has become peer based.

Both platforms are B2C driven, but does Instagram win as the more effective of the two?

Instagram can be shared vertically across Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and other platforms. Pinterest is about curating and discovering information. Instagram gives you the opportunity to reveal a personal side to your brand and to interact with your audience.

Instagram creates narratives and that may be the characteristic that trumps Pinterest. Instagram defines and shapes brands while Pinterest sells brands.

30 Little-Known Features of the Social Media Sites

30 Little-Known Features of the Social Media Sites You Use Every Day

http://blog.bufferapp.com/little-known-features-facebook-twitter-instagram

5 Little-Known Facebook Features

1. Save links to read for later

2. Follow rather than friend

3. Manage Your “Posts to Page”

4. Reorder your page sections

5. Fast advanced stats for any page post

Assorted useful features

Receive email from your Facebook email address.

Download everything you’ve ever done on Facebook.

Check your “other” messages.

Pin a post to the top of your page.

Feature your page owners and liked pages.

Secret emoji. Here are fun tips for Facebook secret emoji.

  • (y) = thumbs-up ‘like’ symbol
  • (^^^) = a great white shark
  • :|] = a robot
  • :poop: = well, you know
  • <(“) = a penguin
  • :Putnam: = the head of former Facebook engineer, Chris Putnam who left the company in 2010

5 Little-Known Twitter Features

1. Create a collection of tweets

2. Tag people in your photos

3. Create a Twitter photo collage

4. Manage Twitter via SMS

  • D [username] + message – sends that person a Direct Message that goes to their device, and saves in their web archive.
  • SET LOCATION [place name] – updates the location field in your profile. Example: set location San Francisco
  • GET [username] – retrieves the latest Twitter update posted by that person. You can also use g [username] to get a user’s latest Tweet. Examples: get goldman or g goldman.
  • FOLLOW [username]: allows you to start following a specific user, as well as receive SMS notifications. Example:FOLLOW jerry

5. Mute Feature

5 Little-Known Google+ Features

1. Run a poll in G+

2. Save posts to empty circles for future reference

3. Share your circles with others

4. Create a photo slideshow that links to your avatar

When someone clicks on your profile picture from your profile page, they’ll see an entire photo album of pictures. You can control what appears in this photo album.

In the Photos menu, scroll or search for the Profile Photos collection. Then add, edit, and arrange the photos in this set.

5. Use a GIF as your profile pic or cover photo

This one’s super simple: Just upload it!

5 Little-Known LinkedIn Features

1. Download a list of your connections

2. Display media files on your profile

3. Message someone you’re not connected with

4. Save a job search

5. Create a tickler file with LinkedIn Relationship notes

5 Little-Known Pinterest Features

1. Set up a secret board

2. Rearrange the order of your boards

3. View all the latest pins from your website (or others)

4. Customize your cover images

5. Pin with a friend

5 Little-Known Instagram Features

1. Where to view Instagram photos online

2. Save an image

3. Add a border to your image

4. How to make a collage

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pic-jointer-picture-collage/id509987785?mt=8

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/split-pic-photo-editor-clone/id570748340?mt=8

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/instagram-photo-and-video-apps/

5. How to repost an Instagram photo

Conclusion

Which of these little-known features did you know already? 

Which of your favorite hidden gems would you like to share?

the right social media for your business

How to Choose the Right Social Network for Your Business

https://blog.bufferapp.com/how-to-choose-a-social-network
the Right Social Network for Your Business

Important questions to ask when choosing a social network:

  1. Does it make sense for my content? (See the seven types of networks listed above.)
  2. Do potential fans spend time there? (See the demographic information above.)
  3. Does it make sense for me?

1 2