Posts Tagged ‘technology’

badges for teachers

start with the teachers, not with the students

OPINION So You Want to Drive Instruction With Digital Badges? Start With the Teachers

Participating teachers advance through a series of inquiry-based professional development modules. Teachers are awarded a digital badge for the successful completion of each 10-hour module. To accomplish this, they must complete the following steps: 1) study module content, 2) participate in a focused discussion with peers working on the same module, 3) create an original inquiry-based global lesson plan that incorporates new learning, 4) implement the original lesson plan in the classroom, 5) provide evidence of classroom implementation and 6) reflect on and revise the lesson created.

The final product of every module is a tested, global lesson plan that articulates learning objectives, activities, assessments, and resources for each stage of inquiry. Upon completion, teachers may publish finalized lessons in a resource library where they can be accessed by other educators. As designed, the HISD badging system will be a four-year, 16-badge approach that equates to 160 hours of professional learning for teachers.

five key features that taken together increase significantly the likelihood that the learning experience for a teacher will lead to results in the classroom for students — which, after all, is the point of professional development:


  • Badging requires demonstrating understanding and implementation of a target content or skill. 
  • Badging provides recognition and motivation. 
  • Badging allows for knowledge circulation among teachers. 
  • Badging can be tracked and assessed. 
  • Badging is a scalable enterprise. 


philosophy and technology

Philosophy’s influence on technology design – and why it needs to change

How we communicate is as important as why

Communication technology has tapped into a very human need to be liked and appreciated.

Why should any of this matter to designers, manufacturers, and users of technology? A narrow view of why we communicate inevitably limits the sorts of we build. Interestingly, many of the things we do with technology are byproducts of what they were originally designed for (e.g. the internet emerged as the result of a US Defence project researching possibilities for network packets). Once we drop our preconceived ideas that transmitting information is their only purpose – an assumption that carries with it a shortsighted vision – the possibilities of what we could create are endless.
There is a difference between understanding the words a speaker has said, and understanding the speaker – understanding the “why” as well as the “what”.

Technology Instruction available free

Spring 2016 technology Sessions available

Student’s relationship with technology is complex. They recognize its value but still need guidance when it comes to better using it for academics.

Educause’s ECAR Study, 2013

InforMedia Services

IMS faculty would be happy to meet with you or your group at your convenience.
Please request using this Google Form: or
by email: |

How you can reach us:

Services we provide:

  • Instruct and collaborate with faculty, staff and students on specific computer, Cloud and mobile applications
  • Assist faculty in course design and instruction to incorporate SCSU’s resources
  • Join faculty in the classroom instructional design to assist students with learning technology application for the class
  • Consult with faculty on instructional design issues, particularly those that use the World Wide Web, multimedia techniques and interactivity
  • Collaborate with faculty, staff and students on technology-related projects
  • Work with campus units in technology planning and acquisition
  • Respond to faculty, staff and students requests and technology developments


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Link to the IMS Satisfaction Survey:

Deep learning and Wearables

RE.WORK Deep Learning Summit, Boston

May 26-27, 2015
Boston, Massachusetts

Internet of Things Summit, Boston 2015

May 28, 2015 – May 29, 2015

Hyatt Regency Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

– See more at:

Curriculum or the Technology

What Comes First: the Curriculum or the Technology?

  • Regardless of the technology, what’s the most important lesson for students to learn?
  • Why do I need to use technology in my daily curriculum?
  • How are these tech tools enhancing what we’re doing?
  • What will the students do with these tools – during and after class?

Think Curriculum Enhancements, Not Technology Implementations

1) Learn How Students Are Using Technology at Home

2) Don’t Use Technology for the Sake of Using Technology

3) Focus on Just One Tech Implementation

4) Utilize the SAMR Model

The SAMR model, developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, represents the stages of tech integration: Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition. This model challenges us to assess and reflect on not only how we integrate technology into our curriculum, but also how we modify, redefine and transform our classrooms through its use.

5) Actively Seek Out Professional Development Opportunities

  • Younger students utilizing QR codes to add a challenging yet fun element to learning to spell.
  • Older students creating digital books or movies to demonstrate a deep understanding on a topic, rather than simply discussing or assessing it.
  • Video conferencing with other schools in your area or network to research, discuss, debate and develop potential solutions to globally significant problems.
  • Skyping with local leaders and guest speakers on specific topics such as coding or programming, networking and composing music.

In Short

Integrating technology into the classroom can be exhilarating, fun, and at times a little scary. That said, I’ve often found that teachers are hungry for more information, and welcome the chance to bring new ideas to the classroom.

In the end, if teachers and their administration are ready to embrace the messiness and the risks that sometimes come with technology, the reward is that your school’s curriculum – which must be strong to start – can truly be taken to the next level, and beyond. Otherwise, we’ll all be still left trying to figure out how an abacus works.

technology in academia

‘Inflection Point’ in IT

“The relationship between IT and the institution really needs to change if we’re going to use technology to address the fundamental issues that need to be addressed in higher education,” Grajek said. “Higher education leaders need to not just let their IT leaders do their own thing, help them fund some initiatives, but they really have to understand the potential of IT.”

Colleges and universities are searching for new talent in part to answer demands for new technologies while simultaneously offering core services such as user support, which Grajek described as the “new normal” for higher education IT offices.

“The CIO has grown from a hardware- or software-focused person in the basement of a building to a higher education executive who is expected to not only understand technology and be able to lead a large, complex and expensive department, but who also should be a first rate communicator who understands the business (and higher education) and can build relationships while implementing all of these projects,”

Where the iPad should go next: Look toward Windows 10

What Microsoft is getting right with tablets–seamless synching between devices, more computing power, and accessories–and why Apple should go there too.

“The iPad is nearly 5 years old. That product, ever since, has continued to ride a thin dividing line between iPhones and Macs: mobile, and computers.

…Will there be both a 12-inch iPad and a 12-inch MacBook Air in 2015? If so, how will they co-exist? Could they be meant for different customers?

…the iPad needs a change. It needs something to ignite interest. It needs a few new ideas.

Microsoft — with its hardware, and with its upcoming Windows 10 operating system — is actually blazing a bold trail. One that Apple may actually be able to learn from.”

Business Insider’s 13 best new iOS apps you might have missed

“From Microsoft’s killer new Outlook email app to fun little games for passing the time like Psych, you’re bound to find something you like.” There’s even an app that lets you volunteer for the blind. Most of the apps are free or less than $5 for iOS. The mobile interface of the Outlook email app (free) looks especially easy to read and use, which is hard to find with most email apps.

The article features Hopper, Letterspace, Funny or Die Weather, Minesweeper Widget Edition, Detour, Khan Academy, and more.

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