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EU sanctions hackers

EU sanctions China, Russia, and North Korea for past hacks

The EU has imposed today its first-ever economical sanctions following cyber-attacks from foreign adversaries.

https://www.zdnet.com/article/eu-sanctions-china-russia-and-north-korea-for-past-hacks/

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EU sanctions Russian intelligence, North Korean, Chinese firms over alleged cyberattacks

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-cybercrime-russia-sanctions-idUSKCN24V32Q

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Pompeo praises EU over sanctions targeting cyberattacks from China, Russia

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/pompeo-praises-eu-over-sanctions-targeting-cyberattacks-from-china-russia/ar-BB17nVlN

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more on hackers in this IMS blog
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against government hackers

How to defend against government hackers

By Mark Rockwell Mar 31, 2017

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/03/31/rule41-aclu-defense-cyber.aspx

The 188-page “Challenging Government Hacking In Criminal Cases” report, released by the American Civil Liberties Union on March 30, addresses new amendments to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, which took effect last December.

Under the changes to criminal procedure rules, feds can remotely search computers in multiple jurisdictions with a single warrant. The rules are touted by law enforcement agencies as a way to streamline 100-year-old rules of criminal procedure

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hackers versus crackers: Guccifer

Hackers versus crackers

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/it-security/hacker-vs-cracker/

http://www.pctools.com/security-news/crackers-and-hackers/

Federal court sentences original Guccifer

By Mark Rockwell Sep 02, 2016

https://fcw.com/articles/2016/09/02/guccifer-sentence-rockwell.aspx

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more in this blog on hackers and crackers

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hackers

https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=crackers

 

hackers and hard drive noises

Hackers could acquire sensitive data through monitoring hard drive noises

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more on hackers in this IMS blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=hackers

phony social media agitation

https://www.npr.org/2020/08/13/901419012/with-more-transparency-on-election-security-a-question-looms-what-dont-we-know

a historic report last week from the nation’s top boss of counterintelligence.

the need for the United States to order the closure of the Chinese government’s consulate in Houston.

metaphor for this aspect of the spy game: a layer cake.

There’s a layer of activity that is visible to all — the actions or comments of public figures, or statements made via official channels.

Then there’s a clandestine layer that is usually visible only to another clandestine service: the work of spies being watched by other spies.

Counterintelligence officials watching Chinese intelligence activities in Houston, for example, knew the consulate was a base for efforts to steal intellectual property or recruit potential agents

And there’s at least a third layer about which the official statements raised questions: the work of spies who are operating without being detected.

The challenges of election security include its incredible breadth — every county in the United States is a potential target — and vast depth, from the prospect of cyberattacks on voter systems, to the theft of information that can then be released to embarrass a target, to the ongoing and messy war on social media over disinformation and political agitation.

Witnesses have told Congress that when Facebook and Twitter made it more difficult to create and use fake accounts to spread disinformation and amplify controversy, Russia and China began to rely more on open channels.

In 2016, Russian influencemongers posed as fake Americans and engaged with them as though they were responding to the same election alongside one another. Russian operatives even used Facebook to organize real-world campaign events across the United States.

But RT’s account on Twitter or China’s foreign ministry representatives aren’t pretending to do anything but serve as voices for Moscow or Beijing.

the offer of a $10 million bounty for information about threats to the election.

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fake net neutrality comments

Judge orders FCC to hand over IP addresses linked to fake net neutrality comments. from r/technology

Judge Orders FCC to Hand Over IP Addresses Linked to Fake Net Neutrality Comments

The Times’ lawsuit follows reporting by Gizmodo that exposed multiple attempts by the FCC to manufacture stories about hackers attacking its comment system. In reality, the Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) crashed, both in 2015 and 2017, after Last Week Tonight host John Oliver instructed millions of his viewers to flood the agency with pro-net neutrality comments.

For over a year, the FCC claimed to have proof that distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks were behind the comment system issues. In August 2018, however, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai finally admitted that wasn’t true. After an inspector general report found no evidence of an attack, Pai sought to pin the blame on his staff—and, for some reason, former President Barack Obama.

Pai stated in an agency memo in 2018 that it was a “fact” that Russian accounts were behind the half-million comments. His attorneys, meanwhile, were arguing the exact opposite in court.

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learn blockchain by building one

Learn Blockchains by Building One

The fastest way to learn how Blockchains work is to build one

Daniel van Flymen  Sept 24, 2017

https://hackernoon.com/learn-blockchains-by-building-one-117428612f46

Remember that a blockchain is an immutable, sequential chain of records called Blocks. They can contain transactions, files or any data you like, really. But the important thing is that they’re chained together using hashes.

If you aren’t sure what a hash is, here’s an explanation.

reading and writing some basic Python, as well as have some understanding of how HTTP requests work, since we’ll be talking to our Blockchain over HTTP.

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more on blockchain in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=blockchain

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