Searching for "games"

games teach thinking skills

SCHOOL USES VIDEO GAMES TO TEACH THINKING SKILLS


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++
More on gaming and education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

ALA Games and Gaming Roundtable

The Games and Gaming Roundtable is now accepting conference presentation proposals on games and gaming in libraries for the American Library Association Midwinter Conference, January 20-24, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia. Presenters will be required to provide either a twenty-minute presentation with Q & A or an hour-long hands on workshop.

Proposals are due September 9th, 2016.

Please include the names and email addresses of the presenters, and the title, a short description, and 200 word abstract of your proposal.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact me at thematthewmurray@gmail.com.

Please pass this message on to any people you feel may find it relevant.

Regards,

Matthew Murray

Chair, GameRT Program Planning Committee

Email: thematthewmurray@gmail.com

Twitter: @MidniteLibrary

MLIS 2015, School of Library, Archival & Information Studies (SLAIS), UBC

Webmaster, ASIS&T Digital Libraries Special Interest Group

Digital Services Chair, BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group

Blogs and other projects: thematthewmurray.weebly.com

virtual reality games and learning

Research Suggests Students Learn More When Collaborating in Virtual Reality Games

By Michael Hart

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/06/22/research-suggests-students-learn-more-when-working-together-in-virtual-reality-games.aspx

In the research project led by Ph.D. candidate Gabriel Culbertson, 48 students were recruited to play two versions of the game. In one group, students were connected via a chat interface with another player who could, if they wanted, offer advice on how to play. The second group played a version of the game in which they were definitely required to collaborate on quests.

The research group found the students in the second so-called “high-interdependence” group spent more time communicating and, as a consequence, learned more words.

The research then expanded to a larger group of 186 Reddit users who were learning Japanese. After reviewing gameplay logs, interviews and Reddit posts, they found that those who spent the most time engaged in the game learned more new words and phrases.

The Cornell research team presented its research results at the Association for Computing Machinery Conference on Human-Computer Interaction in May in San Jose, CA.

+++++++++

more on games in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

more on virtual reality in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

games and badges in education

U Massachusetts Launches its First Online Badge Program

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/03/17/u-massachusetts-launches-its-first-online-badge-program.aspx

By Joshua Bolkan, 03/17/16

The University of Massachusetts’ online consortium, UMassOnline, has launched its first non-credit badge program.

Teaching with Call of Duty, World of Warcraft Subject of New Penn State Course

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/03/18/teaching-with-call-of-duty-world-of-warcraft-subject-of-new-penn-state-course.aspx

By Dian Schaffhauser, 03/18/16

Gaming 2 Learn,” part of Learning Design & Tech, is being offered online to current and future educators through the university’s World Campus. Instructor Ali Carr-Chellman, who once published an article on the Huffington Post titled, “We Need More Games in Schools,”

Students who participate in the course will do a project in which they pick a commercial game and describe how it integrates with their chosen content area. They also need to watch kids play their favorite games and play alongside them, then reflect on those experiences.

More on gaming in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming&submit=Search

more on badges in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges&submit=Search

Best Apps Games and Sites of the Last Year

Mobile: Best Apps, Games and Sites of the Last Year

https://thejournal.com/Articles/2016/01/05/Best-AppsGames-and-Sites-of-the-Last-Year.aspx

GameMaker: Studio
Grades: 5–12
Pricing: Free, paid
Concepts: Digital creation, programming and coding, game design

GameMaker: Studio is a robust game-making tool that appeals to both entry-level novices and game-development pros alike.

The Orchestra
Grades: 6–12
Pricing: $13.99
Concepts: Music theory, memorization, listening, part-whole relationships

The Orchestra is an interactive iPad app for exploring classical music, the orchestra and orchestral instruments.

WonderBox
Grades: 2–8
Pricing: Free
Concepts: Design, geography, curiosity, imagination, making new creations

As its name suggests, WonderBox is an app that piques kids’ natural curiosity through video, drawing, taking pictures, messaging with family and friends and engaging in multistep challenges.

A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy Online
Grades: 9–12
Pricing: Free to try, paid
Concepts: Anatomy, biology, memorization, part-whole relationships

A.D.A.M. Interactive Anatomy Online is a 3D visualization and curriculum-development tool all about the human body. Teachers can select and create assignments that allow students to manipulate 3D images of the human body.

Construct 2
Grades: 7–12
Pricing: Free, paid
Concepts: Digital creation, programming and coding, game design

Construct 2 is a Web-based 2D game-creation tool for students and teachers who want to get into game design without the need to know programming languages.

Fruity Fractions
Grades: 1–3
Pricing: $2.99
Concepts: Fractions, part-whole relationships

Set in a tropical jungle full of brightly colored fruit and animated birds, Fruity Fractions teaches fractions concepts to kids in first through third grades.

games and learning

Four Inventive Games That Show Us the Future of Learning

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/11/26/four-inventive-games-that-show-us-the-future-of-learning

Earth Primer

Designed by Chaim Gingold, a Ph.D. student at UC Santa Cruz, indie developer and designer of Spore’s creature creator, “Earth Primer” is a reinvention of the textbook. Unlike the all-too-familiar “interactive textbooks” that are little more than pictures and animations tacked on to traditional text, “Earth Primer” starts from the ground up. It’s elegantly presented and paced.

Metamorphabet

Patrick Smith, the designer behind “Metamorphabet,” is like the games equivalent of a toymaker.

Extrasolar

Money and time are the two most common barriers to using games in the classroom. “Extrasolar” solves both while also striking pedagogical gold: authentic, self-motivated learning. It’s a free alternate reality game (ARG) that mimics the day-to-day life of a rover driver exploring an alien planet for a mysterious space agency. Rather than placing players in some fantastical world, they interact with what looks like a typical desktop interface, giving their rover commands, and waiting to receive photographs and data from the alien world as well as messages from their employer. Each bit of play requires only a few minutes of activity. The wait builds tension, and when matched with the relatively mundane interface and tasks, it doesn’t feel like a game — which is kind of the point. Best of all: It’s all based in real science and, like with any good ARG, has a healthy dose of mystery to give players a reason to return.

Twine is an open-source tool for telling interactive, nonlinear stories.

http://twinery.org//

You don’t need to write any code to create a simple story with Twine, but you can extend your stories with variables, conditional logic, images, CSS, and JavaScript when you’re ready.

Twine publishes directly to HTML, so you can post your work nearly anywhere. Anything you create with it is completely free to use any way you like, including for commercial purposes.

Twine was originally created by Chris Klimas in 2009 and is now maintained by a whole bunch of people at several differentrepositories.

https://www.graphite.org/ – reviews and ratings for educational materials

immersive journalism, games, and empathy

Virtual reality breathes life into immersive storytelling

http://www.hypergridbusiness.com/2015/01/virtual-reality-breathes-life-into-immersive-storytelling/

Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

James Delahoussaye

Project Syria, a virtual reality experience built by a team of students at USC.

“I sometimes call virtual reality an empathy generator,” she says. “It’s astonishing to me. People all of a sudden connect to the characters in a way that they don’t when they’ve read about it in the newspaper or watched it on TV.”

What Peña’s doing — using virtual reality in combination with reporting — is part of a wider landscape of video games being created to explore the news. And they’re called, appropriately enough, “newsgames.”

“There’s an argument to be made that games are perfect at getting at the systemic problems and challenges in the world,” says Ian Bogost, a professor at Georgia Tech.

He says games are really good at showing the complex underbelly of stories.

Take a game that he helped make called Oil God. In the game, the player controls an oil-rich region, waging wars and inciting coupes. The player learns that oil prices are contingent on all sorts of factors rarely mentioned in a story about the price of a gallon of gas.

The Sociology of Videogames

http://sociologyofvideogames.com/2015/01/25/can-video-games-create-empathy-and-awareness-for-real-world-issues/

creating games to bring awareness to social issues for over a decade.  The game to create the biggest waves was arguably MTV’s “Darfur is Dying” released online in 2006, in which players took up the role of a family displaced by conflict in Darfur.

1 2 3 13