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BYOD policies

Study Examines Benefits and Constraints of BYOD Policies

By Richard Chang 11/18/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/11/18/study-examines-benefits-and-constraints-of-byod-policies.aspx

January 2017 edition of the journal “The Internet and Higher Education,” looked at 17 teachers and their approaches to implementing BYOD policies in their classrooms.

Despite the constraints, most people surveyed agreed that today’s instructors should encourage devices to become part of the classroom, as the perceived benefits and resources exceed the textbooks currently used. At the same time, full implementation might require an entire overhaul of the classroom environment as we know it.
(how about gamification of the teaching process (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/), as it was proposed numerous times and rejected by the librarians?)

The authors of the study are Yanjie Song and Siu Cheung Kong from the Department of Mathematics and Information Technology at the Education University of Hong Kong. The complete report is available for a fee on this site.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! !

Considering this recent statistics

technology use among teachers

and this summer LITA listserv exchange:

BYOD in the library

I am wondering why the recent remodeling of Miller Center 218 remained stuck in the “laptop” model after it was proposed numerous times to consider the BYOD model:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/25/mc218-remodel/

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more on BYOD in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=byod

BYOD in the library

I recent post from LITA listserv is seeking an input on libraries maintaining BYOD-friendly in some corner in the building:

From: Eng-Ziskin, Susanna M
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 4:05 PM
To: ‘lita-l@lists.ala.org’ <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Tablet technology & instruction survey

Does your library have an iPad/tablet cart, or a dedicated classroom with mobile devices? Have you been teaching library research sessions using iPads or tablets? We invite you to participate in a study that aims to take a look at how tablets are used in library instruction, and the experiences of those who administer and maintain them.  We’re hoping to learn about the experiences of others who also use mobile devices for instruction, as our own have been mixed.

The survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and can be accessed using the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VGWWM55.

Participation is voluntary and this survey is anonymous. Participants must be at least 18 years of age. If you complete the survey your consent to participate will be assumed. The survey will be available until 7/1/2016.

We thank you for your time and consideration!

Susanna Eng-Ziskin and Jamie Johnson

Susanna Eng-Ziskin
Acting Chair,  Reference, Instruction & Outreach Services Department—California State University, Northridge Oviatt Libraryc 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8370, Phone: 818-677-4679, http://library.csun.edu, susanna.eng@csun.edu

Last year, MC 218 was supposed to be remodeled. My suggestion to bring MC 218 to the modern standards of a library, as per LITA’s survey, was completely ignored as reported to SCSU library director:

MC218 remodel

BYOD School five issues to consider

5 Things to Consider in Your BYOD School

http://www.android4schools.com/2016/04/14/5-things-to-consider-in-your-byod-school/

1. Can you find apps and sites suitable for all students’ devices?
2. Can your network handle the number of devices that will be added to it?
3. Are you going BYOD to save money by not providing computers to students?
4. How are your students going to share files and or print files?
5. How will you handle inappropriate use of mobile phones?

BYOD and education

BYOD (BOYE) in the Classroom: Necessary or Nice?

http://www.middleweb.com/26605/byod-in-the-classroom-necessary-or-nice/

► Does the technology accommodate and differentiate for all learners’ needs?
► Are students provided both voice and choice with technology, thereby increasing ownership and engagement?
► Are there opportunities for students to engage in peer feedback and collaborative work?

Having students bring their own devices to school is not a panacea for all the challenges in the secondary classroom. Yet if it is planned with thoughtfulness and intention, we have seen BYOD increase student engagement and relevance while reducing costs for the school. The best part: Teachers and students can be creative and autonomous in how this looks in classrooms.

More on BYOD in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/08/millennials-and-mobile-phones/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/24/ifttt/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/23/educational-technology-and-faculty-development/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/28/k-12-technology/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/21/byoe/

Virtualization and BYOD

How Virtualization and BYOD Help Students Learn Anywhere, Anytime

http://thejournal.com/Articles/2015/08/10/How-Virtualization-and-BYOD-Help-Students-Learn-Anywhere-Anytime-on-Any-Device.aspx

there’s nothing done with technology in the school that can’t be done from anywhere and on any device. This has given students and teachers total mobility.

If you have a 1-to-1 initiative, you’ve given students a computer, and when you allow them on your network, you’re going to have all the risks associated with that: corruptions, viruses and other problems that you have to support.

You bring your device, log in with credentials, and now we will run a virtual desktop and you will have, in a secure environment, access to your applications, your files and our network printers, just like if all that had been locally installed on a notebook computer that you had gotten off of a cart.

 

 

Enabling BYOD

Enabling Bring Your Own Device

white paper by the Cisco

To help improve understanding of BYOD and its impacts on modern network environments, this white paper will further explore the many differences that exist between corporate and educational approaches to the technology.

In the education space, dealing with non-standard, user-managed devices has been and still remains the norm. Unfortunately, the variety of devices means a multitude of operating systems and software are encountered, with many “standards” being defined. As a result there is little consistency in the device type or the software being installed. Since the device is owned by the student and is a personal resource, it is often difficult or impossible to enforce a policy that prevents users from installing software. In addition, due to the nature of learning as opposed to a corporate environment, it is also difficult to put a restriction on certain classes of software since all may provide a worthwhile educational purpose.

providing a solution that unifies management and deployment polices across both wired and wireless devices is very desirable.

The Internet of Everything (IoE) has spurred a revolution in mobility. Collaboration anywhere, anytime and with any device is quickly becoming the rule instead of the exception. As a result it is now common for students to bring mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets and e-readers into the academic environment to support their educational endeavors.

The infrastructure supporting BYOD no longer has the sole purpose of providing a wireless radio signal within a given area. The focus is now about providing the appropriate bandwidth and quality to accommodate the ever-growing number of devices and ensure that an application provides a good end-user experience. In a sense, applications are now the major driving force behind the continuing evolution of BYOD. For example, a teacher accessing video in the classroom for educational purposes during class hours should have greater priority than a student in the same area accessing a gaming site for recreation.

A state-of-the-art BYOD infrastructure should now be capable of providing more than just generic, general-purpose wireless connectivity. In the classroom environment, the notion of “differentiated access” often resonates with faculty and staff. Once this has been determined, a policy can be applied to the user and their activity on the network.

Granular security can also be intelligently delivered.
Quality of Service (QoS) rate limiting has been available for some time, but now there are newer QoS techniques available.

Location-based services can provide their first interaction with the university. By delivering campus maps and directional information, location-enabled services can enhance the experience of these visitors and provide a positive image to them as well. As a visitor enters a particular building location, information could automatically be provided. In the case of a visiting student, information about the history of a building, departments contained within the building, or other resources could be presented to enhance a guided tour, or provide the perspective student the ability to have a self-directed tour of the campus facilities.

802.11ac Technology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac)

Software Defined Networking (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software-defined_networking)

 

BYOD

5 Essential Insights About Mobile Learning

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/15/5-essential-insights-about-mobile-learning/

1. Set goals and expectations for teaching and learning with mobile devices before worrying about the device itself.

St. Vrain Valley School District in Colorado,

Mooresville Graded School District

Consolidated High School District 230

2. Develop a strong community of support for the initiative early and keep up transparent communication with parents and community members throughout the process.

Forsyth County Schools in Georgia.

3. Think about equity, but don’t let it stop forward motion.

includes both urban and rural areas,

4. Evaluate the effectiveness of a mobile learning initiative based on the goals set at the beginning of the rollout.

5. Some of the biggest lessons learned include giving up control and trusting students.

included students in the discussions

STAY NIMBLE

While these mobile learning pioneers have seen some of the pitfalls and can help districts new to the game avoid the same stumbles, this space is changing quickly and every community’s needs will be different.

“It’s no longer just something you implement; it’s evolving and it’s unique in each location,” Bjerede said. “If you try to be cookie cutter about it you won’t meet the needs of every kid in every classroom.”

The technology will change, students will surprise their teachers and the best advice to district leaders is to stay open to all the possibilities and allow students to take control of the tremendous learning opportunity that having a device at all times could offer them.

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My note: Kathrina Schwartz offers an opinion, which reflects the second wave (withdrawl) in the 3 steps of innovation

The Struggles and Realities of Student-Driven Learning and BYOD

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/07/the-struggles-and-realities-of-student-driven-learning-and-byod/

A 2013 Pew study revealed that only 35 percent of teachers at the lowest income schools allow their students to look up information on their mobile devices, as compared to 52 percent of teachers at wealthier schools.

Many advocates of using mobile technologies say the often cited issues of student distraction are just excuses not to try something new.
“The way you discourage it is engage them in the activity so they don’t even think of sending a text. You’ve got to jump in and play their game or you’re going to lose them.”

Angela Crawford has heard all the arguments of BYOD evangelists, but doesn’t see how they match the reality of her classroom. “BYOD is very problematic in many schools, mine included, because we have a prominent engagement problem,” Crawford said.

Tactics to improve engagement like making work relevant to her students’ lives or letting them use their phones in class to look up information, haven’t worked for Crawford, although she’s tried.

When she first started, Crawford was enthusiastic about jumping into collaborative, project-based learning. “I thought my colleagues were monsters because of how they were teaching,” she said of a school where she previously worked and where teachers lectured all the time. She tried to teach students through projects, but found it was a disaster. To her students’ parents, her efforts to make the classroom “student-centered” looked like she wasn’t teaching. “There is a different perception of what a teacher should be in different cultures,” Crawford said. “And in the African-American community in the South the teacher is supposed to do direct instruction.”

“What works best for each student is really the heart of student-centered learning,” Crawford said. “Sometimes what the student needs best is direct instruction. They need that authoritative, in-control figure who is directing their learning and will get them where they need to go.” Many of Crawford’s students come from homes run by single mothers who rule with an iron hand. She tries to replicate that attitude and presence. “They respond to that; they like it,” Crawford said. “It’s comforting to them.”

Still, Crawford will not be experimenting with a bring-your-own-device program. “My problem with education innovation is we tend to want to take a new technology or a new idea and go forth with it as if it’s the silver bullet,” Crawford said. “What happens is that teachers who teach in my type of environment realize this would be a disaster in my classroom.”

Crawford is skeptical that kids in higher income areas aren’t misusing technology too. Her children attend school in a more affluent district and they tell her that kids are constantly messing around on their devices. They just switch screens when a teacher comes by. They get away with it because their teachers trust them to do their work.

“I think kids in middle class or upper middle class schools are equally distracted as low-income students,” said Bob Lenz, director of innovation at Envision Schools, a small charter network that’s part of the deeper learning movement. “It’s just that because of the privilege of their background the content and the skills that they need to gain in school — they’re coming with a lot of those skills already– so it’s not as urgently needed.”

BYOD

The Brutal Authenticity Of BYOD

http://www.teachthought.com/trends/byod-is-shortest-path-to-student-centered-learning/

By allowing students to bring in their own devices for learning–rather than insisting that they learn both content and device in school–there is an important opportunity to connect with not just their personal lives, but their natural way of doing things.

Equity

While there are students who badly want technology and can’t afford even the $50, that doesn’t seem to be a strong argument against BYOD adoption, especially in light of what it costs—in time and money—to purchase, train, integrate, and maintain—state-funded, district-purchased, school-assigned devices. This is where schools, local organizations, and communities can step in.

Money and Learning

In the United States there can be a tendency to throw money at problems that are not fully understood. As a nation, America lags behind internationally, the “learning market” being one of the few markets proving evasive in lieu of continued effort, struggle, and spending.

More on BYOD in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=byod

11 Sample Education BYOT Policies To Help You Create Your Own

http://www.teachthought.com/technology/11-sample-education-byot-policies-to-help-you-create-your-own

BYOD

How BYOD Programs Can Fuel Inquiry Learning

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/01/how-byod-programs-can-fuel-inquiry-learning/

Inquiry-based learning grounded in authentic projects go hand in hand with BYOD.

This shift allows teachers to address issues of digital citizenship like privacy, respecting others’ work, and standing up to improper uses on a daily basis as they arise.

“If they’re using that laptop in the classroom that has so much power and another kid is using a smartphone that doesn’t have quite that power or screen real estate, it requires collaboration,”

 

BYOD toolchest: 51 teaching and learning tools for mobile devices

The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now)

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/the-epic-byod-toolchest-vicki-davis

Formative Assessment

Screencasting and Capturing What Happens in Class

Content-Sharing Platforms

  • Sophia: Nudged along by my friend Todd Nesloney, I use Sophia for my computer applications instruction and am very pleased with the results.
  • Haiku Learning: This is the full content management system that I’m trying to get our school to adopt. It’s multiplatform and robust, which makes it a great fit for our BYOD environment.

There are many other apps like MoodleCanvas, and Coursesites. The point is that you should have one in a BYOD environment.

Assessment Aids

All three of these apps — Quick KeyGrade Ninja, and WISE — are available on iTunes and Google Play, but there are more.

Electronic Note Taking

Expression

Students need multiple ways to share and express themselves, particularly verbally and with pictures. This is part of transliteracy.

Cloud Syncing

Graphic Design and Infographics

Color Selection

Presentations

Blogging

Written Expression

Link Sharing

More  (from the blog section)

If you’re working with multiple apps like Google Drive, Dropbox, One Drive, Evernote and need to search across them in one shot, take a look at Xendo (http://xen.do) – gives you a personal, private Google-like search across all your apps.

8 Interactive Video Tools for Engaging Learners

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/film-festival-interactive-video-tools-resources

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