Posts Tagged ‘data analytics’

K12 administrators and data analytics

Data Analytics a Key Skill for Administrators in K–12

A recent report highlights how data can open the door for K-12 school administrators to maximize student outcomes.
Eli Zimmerman
K-12 school districts looking to improve student success rates should invest in training administrators in data analysis, according to a report from the Data Quality Campaign.
Report authors also call on state policymakers to help lead the charge for more literate school administrators. School and district administrators need to model and support effective data use at every level, including as part of classroom instruction

++++++++++++
more on data analytics in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+analytics

Academic libraries teaching and learning outcomes

Chad, K., & Anderson, H. (2017). The new role of the library in teaching and learning outcomes (p. ). Higher Education Library Technology. https://doi.org/10.13140/rg.2.2.14688.89606/1
p. 4 “Modern university libraries require remote access for large numbers of concurrent users, with fewer authentication steps and more flexible digital rights management (DRM) to satisfy student demand”. They found the most frequent problem was that core reading list titles were not available to libraries as e-books.
p. 5 Overcoming the “textbook taboo”
In the US, academic software firm bepress notes that, in response to increased student textbook costs: “Educators, institutions, and even state legislators are turning their attention toward Open Educational Resources (OER)” in order to save students money while increasing engagement and retention. As a result bepress has developed its infrastructure to host and share OER within and across institutions.21 The UMass Library Open Education Initiative estimates it has saved the institution over $1.3 million since its inception in 2011. 22 Other textbook initiatives include SUNY Open Textbooks, developed by the State University of New York Libraries, which has already published 18 textbooks, and OpenStax, developed by Rice University.
p.5. sceptics about OER rapid progress still see potential in working with publishers.
Knowledge Unlatched 23 is an example of this kind of collaboration: “We believe that by working together libraries and publishers can create a sustainable route to Open Access for scholarly books.” Groups of libraries contribute to fund publication though a crowdfunding platform. The consortium pays a fixed upfront fee for the publisher to publish the book online under a Creative Commons license.
p.6.Technology: from library systems to educational technology.The rise of the library centric reading list system
big increase in the number of universities in the UK, Australia and New Zealand deploying library reading lists solutions.The online reading list can be seen as a sort of course catalogue that gives the user a (sometimes week-by-week) course/module view on core resources and provides a link to print holdings information or the electronic full text. It differs significantly from the integrated library system (ILS) ‘course reserve’ module, notably by providing access to materials beyond the items in the library catalogue. Titles can be characterised, for example as ‘recommended’ or ‘essential’ reading and citations annotated.
Reading list software brings librarians and academics together into a system where they must cooperate to be effective. Indeed some librarians claim that the reading list system is a key library tool for transforming student learning.
Higher education institutions, particularly those in Australia, New Zealand and some other parts of Europe (including the UK) are more likely to operate a reading list model, supplying students with a (sometimes long) list of recommended titles.
p.8. E-book platforms (discusses only UK)
p.9. Data: library management information to learning analytics
p.10. Leadership
“Strong digital leadership is a key feature of effective educational organisations and its absence can be a significant barrier to progress. The digital agenda is therefore a leadership issue”. 48 (Rebooting learning for the digital age: What next for technology-enhanced higher education? Sarah Davies, Joel Mullan, Paul Feldman. Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) Report 93. February 2017. )
A merging of LibTech and EdTech
The LITA discussion is under RE: [lita-l] Anyone Running Multiple Discovery Layers?
http://helibtech.com/Reading_Resource+lists
from Ken Varnum: https://search.lib.umich.edu/everything

+++++++++++++
more on academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

Capitalism in the age of big data

https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderUK/videos/vb.1649495281942842/2504257946466567/

#FakeNews #DigitalRecommendationEngines interpretation of data, market dependency “stupid smart recommendation engines” monopolistic structure, keep competitiveness, big data, market concentration

Reinventing Capitalism in the Age of Big Data (Basic Books / Hachette, 2018) by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Thomas Ramge.

++++++++++++++++++++++
more on this broad topic in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/03/05/quit-social-media/

and in the LIB 290 blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/lib290/2018/03/01/duckduckgo-privacy-free-service/

open access symposium 2018 digital libraries

The ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2018 (JCDL 2018L:
https://2018.jcdl.org/) will be held in conjunction with UNT Open Access
Symposium 2018 (https://openaccess.unt.edu/symposium/2018) on June 3 – 6, 2018
in Fort Worth, Texas, the rustic and artistic threshold into the American
West. JCDL welcomes interesting submissions ranging across theories, systems,
services, and applications. We invite those managing, operating, developing,
curating, evaluating, or utilizing digital libraries broadly defined, covering
academic or public institutions, including archives, museums, and social
networks. We seek involvement of those in iSchools, as well as working in
computer or information or social sciences and technologies. Multiple tracks
and sessions will ensure tailoring to researchers, practitioners, and diverse
communities including data science/analytics, data curation/stewardship,
information retrieval, human-computer interaction, hypertext (and Web/network
science), multimedia, publishing, preservation, digital humanities, machine
learning/AI, heritage/culture, health/medicine, policy, law, and privacy/
intellectual property.

General Instructions on submissions of full papers, short papers, posters and
demonstrations, doctoral consortium, tutorials, workshops, and panels can be
found at https://2018.jcdl.org/general_instructions. Below are the submission
deadlines:

• Jan. 15, 2018 – Tutorial and workshop proposal submissions
• Jan. 15, 2018 – Full paper and short paper submissions
• Jan. 29, 2018 – Panel, poster and demonstration submissions
• Feb. 1, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for tutorials and workshops
• Mar. 8, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for full papers, short papers,
panels, posters, and demonstrations
• Mar. 25, 2018 – Doctoral Consortium abstract submissions
• Apr. 5, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for Doctoral Consortium
• Apr. 15, 2018 – Final camera-ready deadline for full papers, short papers,
panels, posters, and demonstrations

Please email jcdl2018@googlegroups.com if you have any questions.

Schema.org and JSON-LD

Introduction to Schema.org and JSON-LD

Web search engines such as Google, Bing, and Yahoo are integral to making information more discoverable on the open web. How can you expose data about your organization, its services, people, collections, and other information in a way that is meaningful to these search engines?
In this 90 minute session, learn how to leverage Schema.org and semantic markup to achieve enhanced discovery of information on the open web. The session will provide an introduction to both Schema.org and the JSON-LD data format. Topics include an in-depth look at the Schema.org vocabulary, a brief overview of semantic markup with a focus on JSON-LD, and use-cases of these technologies. By the end of the session, you will have an opportunity to apply these technologies through a structured exercise. The session will conclude with resources and guidance for next steps.

Learning Outcomes

Participants will leave this webinar with tools for increasing the discoverability of information on the open web.
This program will include presentation slides, bibliographic references to resources referenced to in the slides, and hands-on exercise material. The exercise material will include instructions, template records for attendees to practice applying Schema.org and JSON-LD, and example records as reference material.

Who Should Attend

Librarians and other professionals interested in increasing discovery of their organization’s information and collections on the open web. General knowledge of metadata concepts and standards is encouraged. Familiarity with the concept of data formats (XML, JSON, MARC, etc.) would be helpful.
Jacob Shelby is the Metadata Technologies Librarian at North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries, where he performs metadata activities that support library information services and collections. He has collaborated on endeavors to enhance the discovery of library services and collections on the open web, including exposing NCSU Libraries digital special collections data as Schema.org data. In addition to these endeavors, Jacob has taught workshops at NCSU Libraries on Schema.org and semantic markup.

back to school discussion

Bryan Alexander (BA) Future Trends of Sept. 7

Are you seeing enrollments change? Which technologies hold the most promise? Will your campus become politically active? What collaborations might power up teaching and learning?

  • the big technological issues for the next year?
    robotics? automation in education? big data / analytics?

organizational transformation. David Stone (Penn State) – centralization vs decentralization. technology is shifting everywhere, even the registrar. BA – where should be the IT department? CFO or Academic Department.

difference between undergrads and grad students and how to address. CETL join center for academic technologies.

faculty role, developing courses and materials. share these materials and make more usable. who should be maintaining these materials. life cycle, compensation for development materials. This is in essence the issues of the OER Open Education Resources initiative in MN

BA: OER and Open Access to Research has very similar models and issues. Open access scholarship both have a lot of impact on campus finances. Library and faculty budges.

Amanda Major is with Division of Digital Learning as part of Academic Affairs at UCF: Are there trends in competency-based learning, assessing quality course and programs, personalized adaptive learning, utilizing data analytics for retention and student success?  BA: CBL continue to grow at state U’s and community colleges.

BA for group discussions: what are the technological changes happening this coming year, not only internally on campus, but global changes and how thy might be affecting us. Amazon Dash button, electric cars for U fleet, newer devices on campus

David Stone: students are price-sensitive. college and U can charge whatever they want and text books can raise prices.

http://hechingerreport.org/ next week

++++++++++++++++++
more on future trends in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/05/30/missionu-on-bryan-alexanders-future-trends/

POD 2017

 

 

2016 POD Network Conference

http://podnetwork.org/content/uploads/2016-POD-Program-Final.pdf

https://guidebook.com/g/pod2016

Studying Connections between Student Well-Being,
Performance, and Active Learning
Amy Godert, Cornell University; Teresa Pettit, Cornell University

Treasure in the Sierra Madre? Digital Badges and Educational
Development
Chris Clark, University of Notre Dame; G. Alex Ambrose, University
of Notre Dame; Gwynn Mettetal, Indiana University South Bend;
David Pedersen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Roberta
(Robin) Sullivan, University of Buffalo, State University of New York

Learning and Teaching Centers: The Missing Link in Data
Analytics
Denise Drane, Northwestern University; Susanna Calkins,
Northwestern University

Identifying and Supporting the Needs of International Faculty
Deborah DeZure, Michigan State University; Cindi Leverich, Michigan
State University

Online Discussions for Engaged and Meaningful Student
Learning
Danilo M. Baylen, University of West Georgia; Cheryl Fulghum,
Haywood Community College

Why Consider Online Asynchronous Educational Development?
Christopher Price, SUNY Center for Professional Development

Online, On-Demand Faculty Professional Development for Your
Campus
Roberta (Robin) Sullivan, University at Buffalo, State University of
New York; Cherie van Putten, Binghamton University, State
University of New York; Chris Price, State University of New York
The Tools of Engagement Project (http://suny.edu/toep) is an online faculty development model that encourages instructors to explore and reflect on innovative and creative uses of freely-available online educational technologies to increase student engagement and learning. TOEP is not traditional professional development but instead provides access to resources for instructors to explore at their own pace through a set of hands-on discovery activities. TOEP facilitates a learning community where participants learn from each
other and share ideas. This poster will demonstrate how you can implement TOEP at your campus by either adopting your own version or joining the existing project.

Video Captioning 101: Establishing High Standards With
Limited Resources
Stacy Grooters, Boston College; Christina Mirshekari, Boston
College; Kimberly Humphrey, Boston College
Recent legal challenges have alerted institutions to the importance of ensuring that video content for instruction is properly captioned. However, merely meeting minimum legal standards can still fall significantly short of the best practices defined by disability rights
organizations and the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Drawing from data gathered through a year-long pilot to investigate the costs and labor required to establish “in-house” captioning support at Boston College, this hands-on session seeks to give
participants the tools and information they need to set a high bar for captioning initiatives at their own institutions.

Sessions on mindfulness

52 Cognitive Neuroscience Applications for Teaching and Learning (BoF)

53 Contemplative Practices (BoF) Facilitators: Penelope Wong, Berea College; Carl S. Moore, University of the District of Columbia

79 The Art of Mindfulness: Transforming Faculty Development by Being Present Ursula Sorensen, Utah Valley University

93 Impacting Learning through Understanding of Work Life Balance Deanna Arbuckle, Walden University

113 Classroom Mindfulness Practices to Increase Attention, Creativity, and Deep Engagement Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

132 Measuring the Impacts of Mindfulness Practices in the Classroom Kelsey Bitting, Northeastern University; Michael Sweet, Northeastern University

+++++++++
more on POD conferences in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=pod+conference

analytics on demand

Free Webinar: Driving Decisions With Data

with Analytics On Demand, you can add value to your library’s existing data and unlock key insights about your community.

Monday, July 24, 2017 12 p.m. Central

Tune in to this free 60-minute webcast Joining us for this webinar are:

  • Jason Kucsma, deputy director, Toledo Lucas County (Ohio) Public Library
  • Liz Bondie, education sales consultant, Gale, a Cengage company

++++++++++++++
more on data analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics

responsible analytics

Call for Chapters: Responsible Analytics and Data Mining in Education

https://www.linkedin.com/groups/934617/934617-6276907956181233664

• Who collects and controls the data?
• Is it accessible to all stakeholders?
• How are the data being used, and is there a possibility for abuse?
• How do we assess data quality?
• Who determines which data to trust and use?
• What happens when the data analysis yields flawed results?
• How do we ensure due process when data-driven errors are uncovered?
• What policies are in place to address errors?
• Is there a plan for handling data breaches?

Call for Chapter Proposals page (https://big-data-in-education.blogspot.com)

++++++++++++++++++
more on data mining in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+mining
more on analytics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=analytics

bibliometrics altmetrics

International Benchmarks for Academic Library Use of Bibliometrics & Altmetrics, 2016-17

ID: 3807768 Report August 2016 115 pages Primary Research Group

http://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/min3qqb/3807768

The report gives detailed data on the use of various bibliometric and altmetric tools such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scimago, Plum Analytics

20 predominantly research universities in the USA, continental Europe, the UK, Canada and Australia/New Zealand. Among the survey participants are: Carnegie Mellon, Cambridge University, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya the University at Albany, the University of Melbourne, Florida State University, the University of Alberta and Victoria University of Wellington

– 50% of the institutions sampled help their researchers to obtain a Thomsen/Reuters Researcher ID.

ResearcherID provides a solution to the author ambiguity problem within the scholarly research community. Each member is assigned a unique identifier to enable researchers to manage their publication lists, track their times cited counts and h-index, identify potential collaborators and avoid author misidentification. In addition, your ResearcherID information integrates with the Web of Science and is ORCID compliant, allowing you to claim and showcase your publications from a single one account. Search the registry to find collaborators, review publication lists and explore how research is used around the world!

– Just 5% of those surveyed use Facebook Insights in their altmetrics efforts.

 

 

++++++++++++++
more on altmetrics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=altmetrics

1 2