Searching for "data library"

DPLA aggregation webinar

DPLA aggregation webinar

https://global.gotowebinar.com/join/561128425722875393/722195006

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)

Open Archives Initiative, OAI http://www.openarchives.org/

DSpace http://www.dspace.org/

XSLT http://wiht.link/XSLT-intro

Heather Gilbert and Tyler Mobley from the South Carolina Digital Library
http://scmemory.org

Metadata schema and elements: required, recommended, optional.
required: e.g., contributing institution, date digital, digitization

one central hub as aggregate and 3 other hubs to collect, scan etc.
use ofTab-separated values TSV, http://www.json.org/ JavaScript Object Notation JSON, OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications  ODF

Tyson Mobley:
OCLC multi-site server, aggragated Blacklight catalog –

Project Blacklight :: Blacklight (open source)
Apache Solr – java based search index. highly scalable

complications: multiple metadata formats, but variations of Dublin core.
Solr is not a relational dbase, so management of separate partners’ records in a single Solr index was issue to make it relational.

Gretchen Gueguen
Data Services Coordinator from DPLA
metadata mapping
aggregates data from libraries, archives, museums etc
Content hubs and services hubs (so LRS at SCSU)

For q/s:
http://tiny.cc/ncdpla
https://github.com/ncdhc/dpla-submission-precheck
https://github.com/ncdhc/dpla-sample-repox-xslt
https://goo.gl/ujzZHS

Metadata is basis of the work of DPLA. We rely on a growing network of hubs that aggregate metadata from partners, then we, in turn, aggregate the hubs’ metadata into the DPLA datastore. As we continue to grow our hub network, we have found the practical matter of how to aggregate partner metadata and deal with quality control over the resulting aggregated set becomes our biggest challenge. If your organization is interested in becoming a part of the DPLA network, or if you are interested in how the DPLA works with metadata, we will be hosting a webinar on January 22nd, at 2pm Eastern, about our workflows, and our future development in this area. The webinar will examine the aggregation best practices at two of our DPLA Service Hubs, as the basis of a conversation about metadata aggregation practices among our Hubs. In addition, DPLA has been working on some new tools for metadata aggregation and quality control that we’d like to share. We’ll preview some of our plans and hope to get feedback on future directions. Speakers: Lisa Gregory and Stephanie Williams of the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center Heather Gilbert and Tyler Mobley of the South Carolina Digital Library Gretchen Gueguen of DPLA

 

Signage

There is an informative discussion on the LITA board regarding signage, both hard/software-wise as well as design-wise.

From: Hess, M. Ryan [mailto:MHESS8@depaul.edu]
Sent: Monday, January 05, 2015 6:14 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: Digital Signs – Best practices, hints & tips

Hi Christa,

I don’t manage the signs in our library, but had a part in getting them put in place and designing workflows. Along the way, I found some interesting research on the topic:

San Jose Public Library (2009). San Jose Public Library Signage Design Guidelines. Retrieved from http://www.olis.ri.gov/ services/ ce/ presentation/ SJW-SignageDesignGuidelines.pdf

Envirosell (2007). San Jose Public Libraries & Hayward Public Libraries Final Report. Retrieved from http://sjpl.org/sites/all/files/userfiles/svpl-hpl_final_report.pdf

Barclay, D. A., Bustos, T., & Smith, T. (June 01, 2010). Signs of success. College & Research Libraries News, 71(6), 299.

Shooting more from the hip, my opinion on digital signage is that commonly made mistakes with content include:

– multiplied narratives don’t work in most library cases. Keep everything short and on a single slide

– keep the slide visible for at least a minute to give people a chance to read it

– make sure your graphics are appropriately sized for HD screens (keep those images sharp and avoid pixelation)

On a technical note, we use a mix of solutions:

– PPTs on USBs

– We’ve experimented with Google Drive Slideshows too, to help streamline the work
M Ryan Hess
Digital Services Coordinator
DePaul University
JTR 303-C, DePaul University, Lincoln Park Campus, 2350 N Kenmore Ave., Chicago IL 60614
office: 773-325-7829 | cell:  650-224-7279 |  fax: 773-325-2297  | mhess8@depaul.edu

On Dec 22, 2014, at 2:20 PM, Hirst , Edward A. <Edward.Hirst@rowancountync.gov> wrote:

We are using a Plex Media Server feeding 3 Rokus over a wireless connection from a laptop. We use .jpg pictures for our slides. Each Roku is connected to a different folder on the Plex server since our displays are in different parts of the building.

Edward

—–Original Message—–
From: Junior Tidal [mailto:JTidal@CityTech.Cuny.Edu]
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2014 1:10 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: Digital Signs – Best practices, hints & tips

Hi Christa,

We used two templates for our digital sign. We were using PowerPoint on a Windows machine.

Librarians would take turns updating the slides to promote databases, workshops, library hours, etc., and we had a stable of maybe a dozen or so slides. We updated the slides whenever we needed to promote specific events, usually a couple of weeks before it took place.

This past summer, we switched to using a Raspberry Pi setup installed with Screenly – https://www.screenlyapp.com/ose.html .

This made it much easier to update the slides, because we couldn’t remotely login into the PC with Powerpoint running. Now, we can connect to the RPi/Screenly, and upload images.

Best,
Junior

Junior Tidal
Assistant Professor
Web Services and Multimedia Librarian
New York City College of Technology, CUNY
300 Jay Street, Rm A434
Brooklyn, NY 11201
718.260.5481

http://library.citytech.cuny.edu
Christa Van Herreweghe <christa@ucitylibrary.org> 12/21/2014 5:12

PM >>>

Hello all:

We are new to digital signs having just installed our first.  Would love to hear about any best practices you have developed.

How many slides do you show? (assuming you are doing slides – if not, would love to hear about your format).

Did you develop a template (or two) and develop a consistent “look”
on all your slides?

Who updates your sign and how often?

Other hints and tips are welcome.

Thanks,

Christa Van Herreweghe
Assistant Director/IT Librarian
University City Public Library
ucitylibrary.org

Social Media improvements

Facebook Media Publishing Tools: This Week in Social Media

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/facebook-media-publishing-tools-news

Facebook Introduces New Tools for Media Publishers: These new Facebook media publishing tools allow you “to target posts, remove posts that are no longer relevant and identify popular links that you haven’t shared.”

Facebook Makes Improvements to Insights: These include improvements “to Domain Insights to show how pages and social plugins drive traffic to websites.”

Facebook Updates Search: Now it’s “easier to find the posts that have been shared with you.”

Facebook Brings Trending to Mobile: Now “making it easy for people to explore stories from different sources.”

Twitter Introduces Tailored Audiences From Mobile Apps: “A new way for advertisers to create targetable audience segments based on mobile app actions such as an install, purchase or sign-up.”

SlideShare Releases Analytics to all Users: As a SlideShare user, you can get “deeper insight into the effectiveness of your content through the release of SlideShare Analytics.”

Google Updates Hangouts App for Android: To “make it easier to express yourself, and have more fun along the way.”

YouTube Adds New Feature to Help When Choosing a Track: “You can search the YouTube Audio Library to determine how using a particular track in your video will affect it on YouTube; specifically if it will stay live on YouTube or if any restrictions apply.”

Tumblr Introduces New Explore Button: “It’s kind of like search, but for when you can’t think of anything.”

Google+ Supports a Number of Ways to Express Gender Identity: “Now, the gender field on your profile will contain four entries, ‘Male,’ ‘Female,’ ‘Decline to state’ and ‘Custom.’”

Facebook Revamps Slingshot: “A simpler, cleaner, more fun Slingshot.”

Foursquare Unveils the All-New Foursquare for Windows Desktop/Tablet: “It’s got an all-new look and feel to help lead you to places you’ll love.”

Here are some interesting studies to note:

The Top 14 Social Media Metrics Tracked by Marketers

40% of Facebook Accounts That Represent Fortune 100 Brands Are Unauthorized

PlayBuzz Tops Publishers on Facebook in Shares for November

Here’s a cool social media tool worth checking out:

Workflow: “Your personal automation tool, enabling you to drag and drop any combination of actions to create powerful workflows.”

 

Interactive Marketing and Social Media

Interactive Marketing and Social Media

deCesare, Gina, Miltenoff, Plamen

Section 5, T/TH – 11:00am – 12:15pm and, Section 7, T – 6:oopm – 9:00pm

http://media4.stcloudstate.edu/scsu

  1. Introduction. Who am I, what I do:

http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/

  1. What is the purpose of the meeting today: Interactive Marketing and Social Media
  • Define top 3 questions on your mind and be ready to share

Jerry Seinfeld’s 5 Tips On Social Media Etiquette
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/26/social-media-netiquette-fun-with-jerry-seinfeld/

Social Media: do you use it and how?…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLNWWZN8BAA

  1. PPT, e.g. slide 27, by sharing with the students resources (most of them are infographics,) about best time when to apply social media marketing.

Social Media Examiner has plenty to say about it:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/01/social-media-management/

 

  1. Ideas and directions:
    Peruse over the 3 groups of directions and ideas and choose one. Study it. Outline what do you anticipate being useful for your future work. Add at least 3 more ideas of your own, which complement the information from this group of information sources.

 

 

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/21/social-media-cocktail/
time-saving social media tools
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/19/time-saving-social-media-tools/
30 Little-Known Features of the Social Media Sites
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/09/19/social-media-features/
26 Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Updates
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/08/28/26-creative-ways-to-publish-social-media-updates/
How to Write a Social Media Policy to Empower Employees
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/07/01/social-media-how-to-write-a-social-media-policy-to-empower-employees/
How to Create Awesome Online Videos: Tools and Software to Make it Easy
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/06/24/social-media-how-to-create-awesome-online-videos-tools-and-software-to-make-it-easy/

 

 

 

 

Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy

Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy
Creating Strategic Collaborations
for a Changing Academic Environment

http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/publications/whitepapers/Intersections.pdf

p. 4. digital literacies (including teaching new technologies and rights issues, and the emergence of
multiple types of non-textual content);

p. 7.  every librarian has a role in teaching, whether formally or informally, about scholarly
communication issues.

p. 11. Librarians play a unique role in teaching faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students about
the complete life cycle of information through educational programs geared to different disciplines and
levels of student learning. Undergraduates are now likely to be required to work collaboratively on a
wiki or to write a blog for a class as the first steps in a writing or research assignment or even as the final
product.

p. 12.  ALA OITP Digital Literacy Task Force defined digital literacy as, “the ability to use information and communication technologies to find, evaluate, create, and communicate information, requiring both cognitive and technical skills” (2012, p. 1). In its statement of recommendations to governments and organizations, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions noted that, “media and information literacy includes all types of information resources: oral, print, and digital” (IFLA 2011). Comprehending all kinds of content, including data, statistical, financial, and visual, as well as text, is a critical outcome intended by media and information literacy programs.

p. 13. Data literacy is an area where the impact of external forces, ranging from the increasing demand on students to find and use data to funder mandates to have data management plans, point to a critical area of intersection between scholarly communication and information literacy.

p. 14. Transliteracy is an emerging concept that challenges the current structures of information literacy and scholarly communication programs alike. The definition indicates that this is a key area where scholarly communication and information literacy intersect:

The essential idea here is that transliteracy is concerned with mapping meaning across different media and not with developing particular literacies about various media. It is not about learning text literacy and visual literacy and digital literacy in isolation from one another but about the interaction among all these literacies. (Ipri, 2010, p. 532)

p. 15.  Intersection 3: New Roles for Librarians

Net Neutrality

The companies lobbying furiously against strong net neutrality, in one chart

http://www.vox.com/xpress/2014/11/12/7196761/net-neutrality-lobbying

The companies lobbying furiously against strong net neutrality

What is network neutrality?

Consumers generally connect to the internet one of two ways. They can subscribe to a residential broadband service from a company such as Time Warner Cable. Or they can subscribe to wireless internet access from companies such as Sprint.

These companies have spent billions of dollars laying cables in the ground (in the case of residential internet access) or erecting cell phone towers (for wireless access) to ensure that customers have fast, reliable service.

Network neutrality is the idea that these companies should treat all internet traffic equally. It says your ISP shouldn’t be allowed to block or degrade access to certain websites or services, nor should it be allowed to set aside a “fast lane” that allows content favored by the ISP to load more quickly than the rest.

Since the term was coined more than a decade ago, it has been at the center of the debate over internet regulation. Congress, the Federal Communications Commission(FCC), and the courts have all debated whether and how to protect network neutrality.

Advocates argue that network neutrality lowers barriers to entry online, allowing entrepreneurs to create new companies like Google, Facebook, and Dropbox. But critics warn that regulating the broadband market could be counterproductive, discouraging investment in internet infrastructure and limiting the flexibility of ISPs themselves to innovate.

In January, an appeals court invalidated FCC regulations designed to protect network neutrality. The agency is currently considering how to respond.

QuickWire: College and Library Groups Petition FCC on Net Neutrality

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/quickwire-college-and-library-groups-petition-fcc-on-net-neutrality/53977

Netflix is a Data Hog And other myths about Net Neutrality

https://medium.com/backchannel/netflix-is-a-data-hog-6e790140b189

some_text

http://theoatmeal.com/blog/net_neutrality

http://qz.com/294154/the-real-reason-that-us-internet-service-providers-are-terrified-of-strong-net-neutrality/

 

QQML2015

7th Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries International Conference (QQML2015) 26-29 May 2015, IUT-Descartes University, Paris, France

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

It is our pleasure to invite you in Paris (IUT-Descartes University) for the 7th Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries International Conference (QQML2015,  http://www.isast.org) which is organized under the umbrella of ISAST (International Society for the Advancement of Science and Technology).

This is the seventh year of the conference which brings together different disciplines on library and information science; it is a multi–disciplinary conference that covers the Library and Information Science topics in conjunction to other disciplines (e.g. innovation and economics, management and marketing, statistics and data analysis, information technology, human resources, museums, archives, special librarianship, etc).

The conference invites special and contributed sessions, oral communications, workshops and posters.

Target Group

The target group and the audience are library and archives professionals in a more general sense: professors, researchers, students, administrators, stakeholders, librarians, technologists, museum scientists, archivists, decision makers and managers.

Main topics

The emphasis is given to the models and the initiatives that run under the budget restrictions, such as the Information Management and the innovation, the crisis management, the long-term access, the synergies and partnership, the open access movement and technological development.

The conference will consider, but not be limited to, the following indicative themes:

  1. 1.                Information and Knowledge Management
  2. 2.                Synergies, Organizational Models and Information Systems
  3. 3.                Open Data, Open Access, Analysis and Applications
  4. 4.                Multimedia Systems and Applications
  5. 5.                Computer Networks and Social Networks,
  6. 6.                Health Reference and Informatics
  7. 7.                Information Technologies in Education
  8. 8.                Decision making in service innovation
  9. 9.                Data Mining, content analysis, taxonomies, ontologies
  10. 10.    STM information development

 

Special Sessions – Workshops

You may send proposals for Special Sessions (4-6 papers) or Workshops (more than 2 sessions) including the title and a brief description at:  secretar@isast.org or from the electronic submission at the web page: http://www.isast.org/abstractsubmission.html

You may also send Abstracts/Papers to be included in the proposed sessions, to new sessions or as contributed papers at the web page: http://www.isast.org/abstractsubmission.html

Registrations are registration forms are available from: http://www.isast.org/qqml2015registration.html

Contributions may be realized through one of the following ways

a. structured abstracts (not exceeding 500 words) and presentation;

b. full papers (not exceeding 7,000 words);

c. posters (not exceeding 2,500 words);

In all the above cases at least one of the authors ought to be registered in the conference.

Abstracts and full papers should be submitted electronically within the timetable provided in the web page: http://www.isast.org/.

The abstracts and full papers should be in compliance to the author guidelines: http://www.isast.org/

All abstracts will be published in the Conference Book of Abstracts and in the website of the Conference. The papers of the conference will be published in the website of the conference, after the permission of the author(s).

Student submissions

Professors and Supervisors are encouraged to organize conference sessions of Postgraduate theses and dissertations.

Please direct any questions regarding the QQML 2015 Conference and Student Research Presentations to: the secretariat of the conference at: secretar@isast.org  

Important dates:

First call of proposals: 29th of September 2014

Deadline of abstracts submitted: 20 December 2014

Reviewer’s response: in 3 weeks after submission

Early registration: 30th of March 2015

Paper and Presentation Slides: 1st of May 2015

Conference dates: 26-29 May 2015

Paper contributors have the opportunity to be published in the QQML e- Journal, which continues to retain the right of first choice, however in addition they have the chance to be published in other scientific journals.

QQML e- Journal is included in EBSCOhost and DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals).

Submissions of abstracts to special or contributed sessions could be sent directly to the conference secretariat at secretar@isast.org. Please refer to the Session Number, as they are referred at the conference website to help the secretariat to classify the submissions.

For more information and Abstract/Paper submission and Special Session Proposals please visit the conference website at: http://www.isast.org or contact the secretary of the conference at : secretar@isast.org

Looking forward to welcoming you in Paris,

With our best regards,

On behalf of the Conference Committee

Dr. Anthi Katsirikou, Conference Co-Chair
University of Piraeus Library Director
Head, European Documentation Center
Board Member of the Greek Association of Librarians and Information Professionals

anthi@asmda.com

 

Professor Joumana Boustany

Local Chair

Université Paris Descartes – IUT,

143, avenue de Versailles –

75016 Paris

joumana.boustany@parisdescartes.fr

MOOC Copyright for Educators & Librarians Kevin Smith, M.L.S., J.D., Lisa A. Macklin, J.D.,M.L.S., Anne Gilliland, JD, MLS

Copyright for Educators & Librarians

by Kevin Smith, M.L.S., J.D., Lisa A. Macklin, J.D.,M.L.S., Anne Gilliland, JD, MLS

thread Wk 1 – T2: Copyright: Shortened or Lengthened? – PART 1

Follow the money” was mentioned as a way to understand the concept of copyright and copyright law

Copyright lengths should be shortened.  Term lengths like these rarely benefit actual people.  They benefit corporations, be it publishers or things like Disney.

Karen Lightner: I can see the usefulness of bringing the US into line with the Berne Convention, so that we are in line with other nations’ laws. But the additional 20 years we have added for individuals and the incredibly long period for corporations goes against, I believe, what the founding fathers intended when they specified for a limited time.

Edwin A Quist: There are collections of so-called production music issued with licenses to be used for educational videos.  We have at least two sets of these in our music library (in various styles: rock ,classical, world, electronic, etc.) — but don’t expect great art!  Also WikiMedia Commons has some CC licensed music.

Brad Whitehead: I have no quarrel with protecting corporate trademarks — Disney characters or Nike swooshes, etc. — but maintaining monopolies on creative works for such extended periods primarily  enriches publishers with no benefit to the creators.

Nicholas Theo: There are definitely works created where it can be next to impossible to find the owner, or their descendant 20 years after the creation of the work. I have also witnessed when you do track these people down that they want an exorbitant sum of money for permission to use their creation even when there has been absolutely no interest in it. In the end no deal is made. On the other hand I work with two small non profit organizations whose body of work is of value. The material is actively used, and the body of work is a core asset for the organization. What happens to each organization once the copyrights expire? One organization faces this reality in 2015. The Internet permits an environment where decades of work may be used, and in some instances in ways the original material was never intended to be used. For instance, written passages can be misquoted and there will no longer be a legal mechanism to halt this practice.

Karen Case: I would be curious to know if the Youtube video with Mozart would have been removed if the link was made private.

Susan Martel: I think about The Hobbit which was published in 1937.  The author, Tolkien, died in 1973, and I remember his books being popular in the seventies and the eighties.  It was fairly recently that movies were made based on his books.  It seems fair (and I hope that it is the case) that he left a great legacy behind to his family so that they could continue to receive income from his work.  If Tolkien’s works were in the public domain by the time the movies were made, it is just an easy way for those working in the movie industry to become even wealthier without having to pay anything to the author or his beneficiaries.  Not all works have the kind of potential that Tolkien’s did, but without a crystal ball to predict the future it may be difficult to predict accurately what works will have continued success for generations and which will just be a flash in the pan.

Charles N. Norton: There is something called “Good Faith” effort that many archives hold to that tends to be the “standard” when trying to use copyrighted material for educational use, but it really only applies when you know who the copyright holder is and for whatever reason they simply do not respond to your requests. It does not remove the authors rights and, in fact, many times one does end up having to remove shared material after the fact because the copyright holders finally does get around to denying permission.

Lesli Moore: I’m glad to see some discussion about Open Access to works.  Perhaps instead of shortening the term, creators can circumvent the terms by offering open access using Creative Commons.

Jef Gielen: There are pros and cons. Do we find it reasonable that heirs take benefit from a work they did not contribute to at all ? To me, this is not evident. On the other hand, the copyright can be in hand of foundations trying to continue the work of an author – e.g. by means of scholarships. That’s another story ..

Resources:
Here is a complete list of all the suggested readings for the Copyright for Educations and Librarians Course. Click here for a downloadable PDF version of the Suggested Readings that contains the full URL links.

Week 1

 

Week 2

Week 3

Samples:

OPTIONAL – Resources on music copyright:

Sources for examples:

For the history behind the controversy over “The Lion Sleeps Tonight,” listen to these three YouTube videos:

  • Linda’s “Mbube” – 1939 (start at 0:21)
  • The Weavers with Pete Seeger “Wimoweh” – 1952 (start at 1:13)
  • Tokens “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” – 1961 (start at 0:15)

Week 4

Gaming and Education: Resources

Gaming Learning Society
https://www.gameslearningsociety.org/

Report from the intersection of Games, Learning, and Society
http://remakelearning.org/blog/2014/06/19/games-learning-society-recap/
Games, Learning and Society conference in Madison, Wisconsin. practical ideas and arguments from GLS to help you get through the roadblocks that stand between you and learning or teaching through games.

keywords: gamification + library in Twitter:
Readers Save Legacy Library Content by Crowdsourcing Metadata Games
http://www.gamification.co/2014/05/12/readers-save-legacy-content-by-crowdsourcing-metadata-games/What is Gamification and Why Use It in Teaching?
http://ii.library.jhu.edu/2014/05/13/what-is-gamification-and-why-use-it-in-teaching/What Does the Next-Generation School Library Look Like?
http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/06/what-does-the-next-generation-school-library-look-like/
The library now also has reading lounge areas with comfortable modular seating, as well as tables with chairs and stools that students are free to move around; two music studios; a HackerSpace (with high-tech equipment such as a microscope, 3D printer, gaming hardware and software, and a green screen for filming) and a Maker Space that also houses a 3D printer and serves as a “hands-on” craft room where old technology can be disassembled and re-configured with other materials. In short, the Monticello Library Media Center has become a “Learning Commons.”

following now @valibrarian because of MineCraft http://t.co/RnwW7ahOK2
Minecraft and the library: http://blogs.curtin.edu.au/gamification/news/minecraft-and-the-library/

Library Quest Wrap-Up and Post-Game Assessment
https://babeltech.wordpress.com/2014/03/25/library-quest-wrap-up-and-post-game-assessment/

If you build it …? One campus’ firsthand account of gamification in the academic library
http://crln.acrl.org/content/74/4/208.full
Straight from CRL News
SCVNGR as a platform was attractive to us for several reasons, including UCSD’s experience. First, it incorporated gaming into students’ experience of the library, which has been widely explored and recommended as a way to engage library patrons.2,3 Second, it would enable us to connect with students early in the year without needing to commit personnel to lengthy tours and other scheduled services during a busy time.

Pls consider former IMS blog entries. Keyword: “game”:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=game

 

Academic Libraries and Social Media – bibliography

  1. Zohoorian-Fooladi, N., & Abrizah, A. A. (2014). Academic librarians and their social media presence: a story of motivations and deterrents. Information Development30(2), 159-171.
    http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d95801671%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
    Librarians also believed that social media tools are suitable not only to communicate with users but also
    to facilitate the interaction of librarians with each other by creating librarian groups.
    Librarians also believed that social media tools are suitable not only to communicate with users but also
    to facilitate the interaction of librarians with each other by creating librarian groups. (p. 169)
  2. Collins, G., & Quan-Haase, A. (2014). Are Social Media Ubiquitous in Academic Libraries? A Longitudinal Study of Adoption and Usage Patterns. Journal Of Web Librarianship8(1), 48-68. doi:10.1080/19322909.2014.873663
    http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3drzh%26AN%3d2012514657%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
  3. Reynolds, L. M., Smith, S. E., & D’Silva, M. U. (2013). The Search for Elusive Social Media Data: An Evolving Librarian-Faculty Collaboration. Journal Of Academic Librarianship39(5), 378-384. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2013.02.007
    http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d91105305%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
  4. Chawner, B., & Oliver, G. (2013). A survey of New Zealand academic reference librarians: Current and future skills and competencies. Australian Academic & Research Libraries44(1), 29-39. doi:10.1080/00048623.2013.773865
    http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d94604489%26site%3deds-live%26scope%3dsite
  5. Lilburn, J. (2012). Commercial Social Media and the Erosion of the Commons: Implications for Academic Libraries. Portal: Libraries And The Academy12(2), 139-153.
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    The general consensus emerging to date is that the Web 2.0 applications now widely used in academic libraries have given librarians new tools for interacting with users, promoting services, publicizing events and teaching information literacy skills. We are, by now, well versed in the language of Web 2.0. The 2.0 tools – wikis, blogs, microblogs, social networking sites, social bookmarking sites, video or photo sharing sites, to name just a few – are said to be open, user-centered, and to increase user engagement, interaction, collaboration, and participation. Web 2.0 is said to “empower creativity, to democratize media production, and to celebrate the individual while also relishing the power of collaboration and social networks.”4 All of this is in contrast with what is now viewed as the static, less interactive, less empowering pre-Web 2.0 online environment. (p. 140)
    Taking into account the social, political, economic, and ethical issues associated with Web 2.0, other scholars raise questions about the generally accepted understanding of the benefits of Web 2.0. p. 141
  6. The decision to integrate commercial social media into existing library services seems almost inevitable, if not compulsory. Yet, research that considers the short- and long-term implications of this decision remains lacking. As discussed in the sections above, where and how institutions choose to establish a social media presence is significant. It confers meaning. Likewise, the absence of a presence can also confer meaning, and future p. 149
  7. Nicholas, D., Watkinson, A., Rowlands, I., & Jubb, M. (2011). Social Media, Academic Research and the Role of University Libraries. Journal Of Academic Librarianship37(5), 373-375. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2011.06.023
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  8. BROWN, K., LASTRES, S., & MURRAY, J. (2013). Social Media Strategies and Your Library. Information Outlook,17(2), 22-24.
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    Establishing an open leadership relationship with these stakeholders necessitates practicing five rules of open leadership: (1) respecting the power that your patrons and employees have in their relationship with you and others, (2) sharing content constantly to assist in building trust, (3) nurturing curiosity and humility in yourself as well as in others, (4) holding openness accountable, and (5) forgiving the failures of others and yourself. The budding relationships that will flourish as a result of applying these rules will reward each party involved.
    Whether you intend it or not, your organization’s leaders are part of your audience. As a result, you must know your organization’s policies and practices (in addition to its people) if you hope to succeed with social media. My note: so, if one defines a very narrow[sided] policy, then the entire social media enterprise is….
    Third, be a leader and a follower. My note: not a Web 1.0 – type of control freak, where content must come ONLY from you and be vetoed by you
    !
    All library staff have their own login accounts and are expected to contribute to and review
  9. Dority Baker, M. L. (2013). Using Buttons to Better Manage Online Presence: How One Academic Institution Harnessed the Power of Flair. Journal Of Web Librarianship7(3), 322-332. doi:10.1080/19322909.2013.789333
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    his project was a partnership between the Law College Communications Department, Law College Administration, and the Law Library, involving law faculty, staff, and librarians.
  10. Van Wyk, J. (2009). Engaging academia through Library 2.0 tools : a case study : Education Library, University of Pretoria.
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  11. Paul, J., Baker, H. M., & Cochran, J. (2012). Effect of online social networking on student academic performance.Computers In Human Behavior28(6), 2117-2127. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2012.06.016
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    #SocialMedia and  students place a higher value on the technologies their instructors use effectively in the classroom. a negative impact of social media usage on academic performance. rather CONSERVATIVE conclusions.
    Students should be made aware of the detrimental impact of online social networking on their potential academic performance. In addition to recommending changes in social networking related behavior based on our study results, findings with regard to relationships between academic performance and factors such as academic competence, time management skills, attention span, etc., suggest the need for academic institutions and faculty to put adequate emphasis on improving the student’s ability to manage time efficiently and to develop better study strategies. This could be achieved via workshops and seminars that familiarize and train students to use new and intuitive tools such as online calendars, reminders, etc. For example, online calendars are accessible in many devices and can be setup to send a text message or email reminder of events or due dates. There are also online applications that can help students organize assignments and task on a day-to-day basis. Further, such workshops could be a requirement of admission to academic programs. In the light of our results on relationship between attention span and academic performance, instructors could use mandatory policies disallowing use of phones and computers unless required for course purposes. My note: I completely disagree with the this decision: it can be argued that instructors must make their content delivery more engaging and thus, electronic devices will not be used for distraction
  12. MANGAN, K. (2012). Social Networks for Academics Proliferate, Despite Some Doubts. Chronicle Of Higher Education58(35), A20.
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    Academia.edu
    While Mendeley’s users tend to have scientific backgrounds, Zotero offers similar technical tools for researchers in other disciplines, including many in the humanities. The free system helps researchers collect, organize, share, and cite research sources.
    “After six years of running Zotero, it’s not clear that there is a whole lot of social value to academic social networks,” says Sean Takats, the site’s director, who is an assistant professor of history at George Mason University. “Everyone uses Twitter, which is an easy way to pop up on other people’s radar screens without having to formally join a network.
  13. Beech, M. (2014). Key Issue – How to share and discuss your research successfully online. Insights: The UKSG Journal27(1), 92-95. doi:10.1629/2048-7754.142
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    the dissemination of academic research over the internet and presents five tenets to engage the audience online. It comments on targeting an audience for the research and suggests the online social networks Twitter,LinkedIn, and ResearchGate as venues. It talks about the need to relate work with the target audience and examines the use of storytelling and blogs. It mentions engaging in online discussions and talks about open access research

Libraries social media from James Neal

Social media in libraries from Ecobibl Marianne

Social Media, Libraries, and Web 2.0: How American Libraries are Using New Tools for Public Relations and to Attract New Users from Curtis Rogers

Social Media usage in libraries in Europe – survey findings from EBSCO Information Services

Using Social Media in Canadian Academic Libraries, a 2010 CARL ABRC Libraries Survey from Dean Giustini

Social media adoption, policy and development by Daniel Hooker from Dean Giustini

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