Searching for "ebooks"

MN eSummit 2018

SCSU library digitizing/ archiving VHS tapes from Plamen Miltenoff
Here is the archived copy of the live session:
https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/videos/1634884859955338/
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https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/photos/a.554966814613820.1073741825.288895824554255/1634641216646369/?type=3
round table digital literacy. Jeff Plaman Dept of Education
SIG MN Literacy council
elearning strategies, embedding into faculty curriculum digital literacy.
microcredentials dissertation for professional development. how about grading
definition: where does it start and where does it end. what should people know and able to do. credibility of sources,
digital skills is the how, digital literacy is the what where
eshel alkalai read her
how do we assess disparities in digital literacy.
assessment digital literacy. diagnostic. google form: bit.ly/summit18dl
assignment banks. conceptual framework, where does it fit.
K12 technology mini-sessions. people are scared of acronyms. culture change. immediate win.
not digital feed but digital stream.
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https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/photos/a.554966814613820.1073741825.288895824554255/1634729463304211/?type=3
#enhancedEbooks w Kelly Vallandigham Kelly Vallandingham,
Enhanced ebooks
https://ccaps.umn.edu/minnesota-elearning-summit/enhanced-ebooks-bold-new-frontier-or-barren-wasteland
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Rob Bylik Eros? for geo
open stacks, open textbooks library. loadstar, indesign

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Open Publishing Opportunities

From Classroom Use to Statewide Initiatives

https://pubs.lib.umn.edu/index.php/mes/article/view/1424

NetDragon acquired Edmodo

China’s NetDragon to Acquire Edmodo for $137.5 Million

By Betsy Corcoran and Tony Wan     Apr 9, 2018 https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-04-09-china-s-netdragon-to-acquire-edmodo-for-137-5-million

NetDragon Websoft, a publicly-traded company based in Fuzhou, China, has agreed to pay $137.5 million for Edmodo.

The deal could mark the beginning of the end for the “free” model of education technology, at least for standalone education companies without other strong revenue streams to support them.

Edmodo was started in 2008 by a teacher and IT support person as a “Facebook-like” community aimed at connecting educators with students and with one another. Also like Facebook, Edmodo grew rapidly. Currently, the company, now based in San Mateo, Calif., claims more than 90 million registered users (both teachers and students) in 400,000 schools across 192 countries.

Edmodo struggled, however, to find a business model that would support its burgeoning community. It raised close to $100 million in funding, and began seeking another round last year. The company had shifted to an advertising-based model—although one in which the company was trying to move carefully and respect its audience of teachers and students.

According to a financial statement published by NetDragon, Edmodo lost $19.5 million in 2017, based on revenue of approximately $1 million.

That seems to be an increasingly popular path. A decade ago, the big education companies were traditional textbook providers such as Pearson. Now the most powerful players are technology companies that offer devices and software. At the top of the list: Google, which supports Chromebooks as well as Google Classroom, and Apple, which sells iPads, Macs and now the Schoolwork app.

By contrast, NetDragon began in 1999 and built its initial financial muscle with games. It has, however, long identified education as one of its top areas of interest. Recently the company has begun purchasing education technology assets at a rapid clip. In 2015, NetDragon paid approximately $130 million to acquire U.K.-based interactive whiteboard maker, Promethean, which gave it a hardware-based entry into classrooms.

The company, which refers to the hardware as “interactive panels,” is equipping 13,000 classrooms in Moscow with digital whiteboards.

Last year, NetDragon also acquired JumpStart, an educational game company behind iconic titles including Math Blaster. And earlier this year, it bought Sokikom, an online game-based math program.

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more about Edmodo in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edmodo

ePub converter

Online converter

https://ebook.online-convert.com/convert-to-epub

https://www.zamzar.com/convert/epub-to-pdf/

https://calibre-ebook.com/ — (https://lifehacker.com/5509965/how-can-i-convert-pdfs-and-other-ebooks-to-the-epub-format)

Using Adobe InDesign to convert PDF to ePub: https://forums.adobe.com/thread/976831

and

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-best-free-PDF-to-EPUB-converter

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more on ePub in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=epub

Screencast O Matic

My Favorite Screencasting Tool Now Works on Chromebooks

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/02/my-favorite-screencasting-tool-now.html

There is a free version and a paid “pro” version of Screencast-o-Matic. The free version will let you record for up to 15 minutes, record as many videos as you like, save to your Google Drive or local drive, and use your webcam while recording a screencast. The pro version removes the time limit, removes the Screencast-o-Matic watermark, enables cursor highlighting (that yellow circle you see on my screencast videos), enables drawing tools, and enables access to the offline editor.

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more on screen capture and screencast in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=screencast

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

multimedia books

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/03/5-tools-for-creating-multimedia-books.html

5 Tools for Creating Multimedia Books – 2018-25eo7ji

LucidPress https://www.lucidpress.com/

https://www.apple.com/ibooks-author/

https://www.writereader.com/en

Book Creator

Book Creator – the simple way to create beautiful ebooks

MadMag

https://madmagz.com/

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added Oct. 30, 2018

5 Ways to Make Multimedia Books

Storybird provides templates and artwork for creating digital stories.

Alphabet Organizer is a great little tool from Read Write Think

Widbook is a platform designed to help people collaboratively create multimedia books.

Book Creator

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more on ebooks in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=electronic+books

more on OER in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=OER

discovery layers

http://www.ala.org/alctsnews/features/e-forum-discovery-layers

Erika Johnson and Kristin E. Martin

by discovery layer, the moderators were referring to the variety of tools available to libraries that bring together article-level content, specialized databases, and the content traditionally found inside a library catalog (e.g., books and journal titles) into a single searchable index. Based on the survey, 67% of e-forum participants are using a discovery layer and 83% maintain this layer alongside the traditional catalog. During the e-forum participants identified a number of commercial systems in use at their libraries (Summon, Encore, EDS, WorldCat Discovery, Primo), as well as some customized or open-source products. Participants at some specialized and public libraries expressed opinions that discovery layers do not fit their institutional needs, either because of the lack of sophisticated searching or specialized content, or because of overemphasis on article content.

In academic libraries, discovery layers tend to be the preferred tool for undergraduates, while more advanced scholars (and some library staff) prefer the traditional library catalog for known items, additional search features, and more specialized content. Discussion about the different levels of user sophistication and varying research needs continued through the entire e-forum. One participant put the difference between searching in terms of recall versus precision. Discovery makes an ideal tool for quickly returning at least some relevant results—great for basic research—but often brings back a large number of irrelevant results in a huge set.

From a technical services perspective, discovery layers have led to changes in technical services operations.

Discovery systems are not one size fits all. Special collections librarians and consortial members shared some concerns about the way discovery systems display information.

Good Question! What is a Discovery Layer?

By Executive Director, OhioLINK  Thursday, January 16, 2014 – 9:50am
https://www.oh-tech.org/blog/good_question_what_discovery_layer
a discovery layer is a Google-like search across all library resources. In library language, a discovery layer is a searchable meta-index of library resources, usually including article-level metadata, e-book metadata, metadata from library catalogs, open access resource metadata, etc., and it includes a means of retrieving resources in the result set through linking technology.

Why is a discovery layer needed for libraries?

Without a discovery layer, users have to search many separate silos of information one by one – the library catalog for books and journals, publisher sites and individual ejournals in particular subjects for articles, and other specialized databases. Even for experienced users who know which databases and resources are likely to be most relevant to their needs, this is time-consuming and involves duplicating the same search over and over in different places. For novice users, or those who want a broad, interdisciplinary search, the initial choice of resource can be daunting and frustrating, unless users already know to ask their librarians for help. In addition, every database or resource interface is different – there are many similarities, but users have to learn different procedures and strategies for each information silo. While specialized interfaces deliver a lot of power for the advanced user, sometimes they can get in the way for other kinds of tasks.

Why not just use Google or another search engine?

Many library resources are difficult to find using search engines, even if a user is savvy enough to be using Google Scholar or Microsoft Academic Search instead of regular Google or Bing. In addition, almost all online library resources, such as full-text articles and ebooks, are most decidedly not free or open access – academic libraries pay quite a bit of money for them

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more on academic libraries in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

students and etext

Student Engagement with E-Texts: What the Data Tell Us

by Serdar Abaci, Joshua Quick and Anastasia Morrone Monday, October 9, 2017

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/10/student-engagement-with-etexts-what-the-data-tell-us

  • This case study of Indiana University’s e-text initiative reports on students’ actual use of and engagement with digital textbooks.
  • In a typical semester, students read more in the first four weeks and less in later weeks except during major assessment times; in a typical week, most reading occurs between 5:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. from Monday to Thursday, indicating that students use e-texts mainly as a self-study resource.
  • Highlighting was the markup feature most used by students, whereas use of the other interactive markup features (shared notes, questions, and answers) was minimal, perhaps because of students’ lack of awareness of these features.
  • Research found that higher engagement with e-texts (reading and highlighting) correlated with higher course grades.

Although cost savings is often cited as a key advantage of electronic textbooks (aka, e-textbooks or simply e-texts), e-texts also provide powerful markup and interaction tools. For these tools to improve student learning, however, their adoption is critically important.
Indiana U etext initiative

The Indiana University e-texts program, which began in 2009, has four primary goals:

  1. Drive down the cost of materials for students
  2. Provide high-quality materials of choice
  3. Enable new tools for teaching and learning
  4. Shape the terms of sustainable models that work for students, faculty, and authors

To date, student savings on textbooks amount to $21,673,338. However, we recognize that many students do not pay the full list price for paper textbooks when they purchase online, buy used copies, or recoup some of their costs when they resell their texts after the semester is over.
herefore, we divide the calculated savings by two and report that total as a more accurate representation of student savings. Consequently, we claim that students have saved about $11 million since IU’s e-texts program started in spring 2012.

In addition to printing through the e-text platform, students can purchase a print-on-demand (PoD) copy of an e-text for an additional fee.

One downside of e-texts is that students lease their textbook for a limited time instead of owning it. This lease generally lasts a semester or six months, and students lose their access afterwards. However, with IU’s e-text model, students get access to the textbook before the first day of class and maintain their access until they graduate from Indiana University. That is, students can go back to the e-texts after their course to review or reference the content in the book. This could be especially important if the e-text course is a prerequisite for another course.

 

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more on etext and ebooks in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=ebook

screencapture tools comparison

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/11/comparison-of-screencasting-tools.html

Flowers in Chania

Four Tools for Creating Screencasts on Chromebooks – A Comparison

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2016/04/four-tools-for-creating-screencasts-on.html

CaptureCast, 

TechSmith’s Snagit

Screencastify

 

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more on Look in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/09/05/loom-screencast/
more on screencasting in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=screen

Reproducibility Librarian

Reproducibility Librarian? Yes, That Should Be Your Next Job

https://www.jove.com/blog/2017/10/27/reproducibility-librarian-yes-that-should-be-your-next-job/
Vicky Steeves (@VickySteeves) is the first Research Data Management and Reproducibility Librarian
Reproducibility is made so much more challenging because of computers, and the dominance of closed-source operating systems and analysis software researchers use. Ben Marwick wrote a great piece called ‘How computers broke science – and what we can do to fix it’ which details a bit of the problem. Basically, computational environments affect the outcome of analyses (Gronenschild et. al (2012) showed the same data and analyses gave different results between two versions of macOS), and are exceptionally hard to reproduce, especially when the license terms don’t allow it. Additionally, programs encode data incorrectly and studies make erroneous conclusions, e.g. Microsoft Excel encodes genes as dates, which affects 1/5 of published data in leading genome journals.
technology to capture computational environments, workflow, provenance, data, and code are hugely impactful for reproducibility.  It’s been the focus of my work, in supporting an open source tool called ReproZip, which packages all computational dependencies, data, and applications in a single distributable package that other can reproduce across different systems. There are other tools that fix parts of this problem: Kepler and VisTrails for workflow/provenance, Packrat for saving specific R packages at the time a script is run so updates to dependencies won’t break, Pex for generating executable Python environments, and o2r for executable papers (including data, text, and code in one).
plugin for Jupyter notebooks), and added a user interface to make it friendlier to folks not comfortable on the command line.

I would also recommend going to conferences:

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more on big data in an academic library in this IMS blog
academic library collection data visualization

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/26/software-carpentry-workshop/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=data+library

more on library positions in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=big+data+library
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/14/technology-requirements-samples/

on university library future:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/12/10/unviersity-library-future/

librarian versus information specialist

 

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