Searching for "unplug"

contemplative computing, contemplative pedagogy and getting “unplugged”

Mark Zuckerberg’s Sister Published A Book About A Child Whose Mom Takes Her iPad Away
http://www.businessinsider.com/randi-zuckerbergs-kids-book-dot-2013-11#ixzz2jmchiAAf

social media etiquette

unplug

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/books/review/randi-zuckerbergs-dot-complicated-and-dot.html

Contemplative Pedagogy and Dealing with Technology
Dan Barbezat, Amherst College; David Levy, University of Washington

https://docs.google.com/viewer?pid=sites&srcid=cG9kbmV0d29yay5vcmd8d2lraXBvZGlhfGd4OjY4MDVkOTRlNGQyODY0ZjY&docid=9ffbca34d1874ac24b0a339bd01f94cf%7Cbeba8a8cdb041811cbd3136e0fdbd53b&a=bi&pagenumber=45&w=800

The accelerating pace of life is reducing the time for thoughtful reflection and in particular for contemplative scholarship, within the academy. The loss of time to think is occurring at exactly the moment when scholars, educators, and students have gained access to digital tools of great value to scholarship. This interactive session reviews research on technology’s impacts and demonstrates some contemplative practices that can respond to them. Contemplative pedagogy can offset the distractions of our multi-tasking, multi-media culture, and show how the needs of this generation of students can be met through innovative teaching methods that integrate secular practices of contemplation.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Walking the Labyrinth: Contemplative Instructional Techniques to Enhance Learner Engagement
Carol Henderson and Janice Monroe, Ithaca College

Bringing ancient traditional meditative skills into the contemporary classroom, con-templative learning techniques serve as an effective counterbalance to the speedi-ness and distractions of today’s fast-paced technology-based cultural environment.  Applicable to both faculty development programs and to faculty working directlywith students, contemplative methods create a richer, more engaging learningenvironment by allowing participants to quiet their minds and focus deeply on the material at hand. This interactive session provides instruction and practice in con-templative techniques, offers examples of their use, and supports the integration of these techniques into any discipline or subject area.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Contemplative Computing and Our Future of Education

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Stanford University

A generation of educators have spent their professional lives hearing that technol-
ogy is changing the world, transforming the way we think, and that higher educa-
tion must evolve or become obsolete. In case you didn’t get the message in the

1960s and 1970s, with cassette tapes, television and mainframe computers, it was

repeated in the 1980s when personal computers appeared; repeated again in the

1990s, with CD-ROMs (remember those) and the World Wide Web; repeated again

in the early 2000s with blogs and wikis; and recently, repeated once again in the

wake of social media, YouTube and the real-time Web.

This language of technological revolution and institutional reaction is backward. It

gives too much credit and agency to technology, and makes today’s changes seem

unprecedented and inevitable. Neither is actually true. Contemplative computing—

the effort to design technologies and interactions that aren’t perpetually demanding

and distracting, but help users be more mindful and focused—provides a language

for talking differently about the place of technology in teaching, learning, and edu-
cation. We think of today’s technologies as uniquely appealing to our reptilian, dopa-
mine- and stimulation-craving brains. In reality, distraction is an ancient problem,

and the rise of contemplative practices and institutions (most notably monasteries

and universities) is a response to that problem. Abandoning our traditional role as

stewards of contemplative life is as dangerous for the societies we serve as it is

short-sighted and counterproductive. Contemplative computing argues that even

today, people have choices about how to interact with technologies, how to use

them, and how to make the parts of our extended minds; and that part of our job

as educators is to show students how to exercise that agency.

Your Brain Off Facebook

This Is Your Brain Off Facebook

Planning on quitting the social platform? A major new study offers a glimpse of what unplugging might do for your life. (Spoiler: It’s not so bad.)

Benedict Carey, Jan 30, 2019

This Is Your Brain Off Facebook by BENEDICT CAREY

So what happens if you actually do quit? A new study, the most comprehensive to date, offers a preview.

Well before news broke that Facebook had shared users’ data without consent, scientists and habitual users debated how the platform had changed the experience of daily life.

the use of Facebook and other social media is linked to mental distress, especially in adolescents.

Others have likened habitual Facebook use to a mental disorder, comparing it to drug addiction and even publishing magnetic-resonance images of what Facebook addiction “looks like in the brain.”

When Facebook has published its own analyses to test such claims, the company has been roundly criticized.

For abstainers, breaking up with Facebook freed up about an hour a day, on average, and more than twice that for the heaviest users.

research led by Ethan Kross, a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, has found that high levels of passive browsing on social media predict lowered moods, compared to more active engagement.

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more on Facebook in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=facebook

Qi Gong

Dr. Jerry Wellik will lead
When: every Monday
Where: in Atwood’s Maple Room
FREE Qi Gong sessions. Here is more info: https://www.springforestqigong.com/

Who: Faculty, staff, students and all community members are welcome.

Please consider also introducing in your classes to contemplative computing. Here is more information:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

You may have heard the names of
David Levy (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/01/mindful-tech/ )

Dan Barberzat (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/05/getting-unplugged/ )
and, naturally,
Sherry Turkle

Please let us know, if you need more information, regarding the well-being of you and your students in relation to technology.

flipped classroom without technology

The Technology-Free Approach to Flipping the Classroom

Wednesday, September 13, 2017 | 1:00 PM Central | 60 Minutes

https://www.magnapubs.com/online-seminars/the-technology-free-approach-to-flipping-the-classroom-14539-1.html

Active learning techniques have been shown to improve the classroom experience, leading to higher student success rates and greater student engagement.

As an increasing number of higher education faculty apply the flipped classroom model to their courses, they’re discovering that although the idea of a flip is straightforward, the model is easy to get wrong.

BENEFITS

The flipped model puts greater responsibility for learning on the students while providing them with more room to experiment in the classroom. This leads to a shift in priorities, allowing classroom time to move from merely covering material to working toward mastery of it.

As a result of this presentation, you gain a new perspective on what it means to flip the classroom, leading to revitalized teaching. This seminar not only explores concrete strategies for engaging students in the flipped classroom, but it also delves into why technology-free approaches are important. You will better understand how to do the following:

  • Organize student-led activities to encourage greater communication in the classroom
  • Create a dynamic session devoted to learning through hands-on work
  • Integrate unplugged methods of student engagement into flipped and active classroom learning environments
  • Lean on tools such as sticky notes, flip charts, whiteboards, and dice to inspire new ways of thinking

LEARNING GOALS

The flipped classroom model challenges instructors to create learning experiences in which students have the freedom to apply, analyze, and evaluate course content during class time.

The question is: How do you continue finding innovative teaching strategies and tools to engage students in this way?

Although some creativity is required to plan a flip, the process doesn’t have to be intimidating. This seminar demonstrates a number of simple strategies that motivate students to interact with the material and engage with one another. You will learn the following:

  • Discover a range of “unplugged” teaching strategies used to engage students
  • Learn to identify opportunities for unplugging devices and creating a tech-free learning experience in the classroom
  • Master simple ways to integrate unplugged flipped methods into your course
  • Understand the benefits to including unplugged teaching and learning strategies in flipped course design

TOPICS COVERED

  • Developing new strategies and ideas for the flipped classroom
  • Increasing student engagement with unplugged methods
  • Integrating unplugged methods into flipped and active learning classrooms
  • Using everyday tools to inspire higher-level thinking
  • Expanding the definition of the flipped classroom

AUDIENCE

This seminar is intended for faculty and instructors interested in a role change in the classroom. The flipped learning environment requires teachers to give up their front-of-class position in favor of a more collaborative and cooperative contribution to the teaching process. Are you ready to make a change?

Presenter: https://www.magnapubs.com/bios/barbi-honeycutt-850.html

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more on flipped classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=flipped

technology for early childhood students

Plan for today, Mon, Nov 17 class session:

Parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development.

  1. Introduce myself, who I am, who do I work with. Why is it good to know IMS and consider working with IMS. How to contact us – 5 min
  2. Start with a video from the following IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/ :
    http://youtu.be/d5kW4pI_VQw – 2 min. What is the video about, how do students think it relates to their class (parent involvement in their children’s social emotional and academic development) – about 5 min
  3. Group work assignment – what is digital literacy and why is it important to people of all ages:
    Students work in groups and outline a definition of digital literacy and a list of 5 reasons about the importance – 5 min
    Study and discuss the following infographic (5 min)
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/10/16/early-learners-tech-use/
    For and against children spending time with technology. Gaming, social media, and computer use in general as addiction. “Disconnect/Unplugged” (Sherry Turkle) versus contemplative computing and similar meditative and contemplative practices: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/05/getting-unplugged/
  4. Discussion on how does digital literacy vary between age groups; how do people from different ages communicate. How do they work together and help each other when learning about digital literacy. Who is the best source for students to learn about digital literacy (hint – IMS ;)) – 10 min
    Suggested source for more information: The SlideShare presentation on the IMS blog entry: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/05/01/on-digital-literacy/: http://www.slideshare.net/dajbelshaw/etmooc-t3-s1-digital-literacies-with-dr-doug-belshaw
  5. Discussion on digital identity, digital citizenship, privacy and security. – 10 min
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/10/03/digital-identity-and-digital-citizenship/
  6. Questions and suggestions regarding