Archive of ‘Multiple intelligences’ category

learning styles debunked

“Another nail in the coffin for learning styles” – students did not benefit from studying according to their supposed learning style

EDUCATIONAL

Christian Jarrett https://digest.bps.org.uk/2018/04/03/another-nail-in-the-coffin-for-learning-styles-students-did-not-benefit-from-studying-according-to-their-supposed-learning-style/

My note: Thank you Michael Pickle for the FB post: https://www.facebook.com/groups/177622448929227/permalink/1894771380547650/

Venn Diagram

The idea that we learn better when taught via our preferred modality or “learning style” – such as visually, orally, or by doing – is not supported by evidence. Nonetheless the concept remains hugely popular, no doubt in part because learning via our preferred style can lead us to feel like we’ve learned more, even though we haven’t.

For a new paper in Anatomical Sciences Education, a pair of researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have conducted just such an investigation with hundreds of undergrads. Once again however the findings do not support the learning styles concept, reinforcing its reputation among mainstream psychologists as little more than a myth.

one of the most popular online learning styles surveys, the VARK. Taken by millions of people worldwide, the VARK categorises students according to how much they prefer to learn visually, via auditory information, through reading and writing, or through kinaesthetics (by doing or by practical example).

Husmann and O’Loughlin don’t pull any punches in their conclusion. Their findings, they write – especially when considered in the context of past research – “provide strong evidence that instructors and students should not be promoting the concept of learning styles for studying and/or for teaching interventions. Thus, the adage of ‘I can’t learn subject X because I am a visual learner’ should be put to rest once and for all.”

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more on learning styles in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=learning+styles

VR and students with special needs

Bibliography on virtual reality and students with physical and cognitive disabilities

Jeffs, T. L. (2009). Virtual Reality and Special Needs. Themes In Science And Technology Education2(1-2), 253-268.

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Lahav, O., Sharkey, P., & Merrick, J. (2014). Virtual and augmented reality environments for people with special needs. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development7(4), 337-338.

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Cai, Y., Chiew, R., Nay, Z. T., Indhumathi, C., & Huang, L. (2017). Design and development of VR learning environments for children with ASD. Interactive Learning Environments25(8), 1098-1109. doi:10.1080/10494820.2017.1282877

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Passig, D. (2011). The Impact of Immersive Virtual Reality on Educators’ Awareness of the Cognitive Experiences of Pupils with Dyslexia. Teachers College Record113(1), 181-204.

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Ke, F., & Im, T. (2013). Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Training for Children with High-Functioning Autism. Journal Of Educational Research106(6), 441-461. doi:10.1080/00220671.2013.832999

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Collins, J., Hoermann, S., & Regenbrecht, H. (2016). Comparing a finger dexterity assessment in virtual, video-mediated, and unmediated reality. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development9(3), 333-341.

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Epure, P., Gheorghe, C., Nissen, T., Toader, L. O., Macovei, A. N., Nielsen, S. M., & … Brooks, E. P. (2016). Effect of the Oculus Rift head mounted display on postural stability. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development9(3), 343-350.

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Sánchez, J., & Espinoza, M. (2016). Usability and redesign of a university entrance test based on audio for learners who are blind. International Journal Of Child Health And Human Development9(3), 379-387.

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Rizzo, A. A., Bowerly, T., Shahabi, C., Buckwalter, J. G., Klimchuk, D., & Mitura, R. (2004). Diagnosing Attention Disorders in a Virtual Classroom. Computer (00189162)37(6), 87-89.

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Eden, S. (2008). The effect of 3D virtual reality on sequential time perception among deaf and hard-of-hearing children. European Journal Of Special Needs Education23(4), 349-363. doi:10.1080/08856250802387315

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Eden, S., & Bezer, M. (2011). Three-dimensions vs. two-dimensions intervention programs: the effect on the mediation level and behavioural aspects of children with intellectual disability. European Journal Of Special Needs Education26(3), 337-353. doi:10.1080/08856257.2011.593827

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Lorenzo, G., Lledó, A., Roig, R., Lorenzo, A., & Pomares, J. (2016). New Educational Challenges and Innovations: Students with Disability in Immersive Learning Environments. In Virtual Learning. InTech. https://doi.org/10.5772/65219

https://www.intechopen.com/books/virtual-learning/new-educational-challenges-and-innovations-students-with-disability-in-immersive-learning-environmen

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more on virtual reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

cultural differences

Chinese, Americans Truly See Differently, Study Says

John Roach for National Geographic NewsAugust 22, 2005

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/08/0822_050822_chinese.html

Richard Nisbett, a psychologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Westerners and Easterners see the world differently

http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7882

special and gifted education

Special and Gifted Education: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications (4 Volumes)

Release Date: April, 2016

Description

Diverse learners with exceptional needs require a specialized curriculum that will help them to develop socially and intellectually in a way that traditional pedagogical practice is unable to fulfill. As educational technologies and theoretical approaches to learning continue to advance, so do the opportunities for exceptional children.

Special and Gifted Education: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications is an exhaustive compilation of emerging research, theoretical concepts, and real-world examples of the ways in which the education of special needs and exceptional children is evolving. Emphasizing pedagogical innovation and new ways of looking at contemporary educational practice, this multi-volume reference work is ideal for inclusion in academic libraries for use by pre-service and in-service teachers, graduate-level students, researchers, and educational software designers and developers.

Topics Covered

  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism
  • Behavioral Disorders
  • Emotional Disorders
  • Exceptional Learners
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Physical Disabilities
  • Response to Intervention
  • Talented Education

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More on gifted education in this IMS blog:
more on special education in this IMS blog:

Slow-Working Students

A Few Strategies to Help Slow-Working Students

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

How Open Badges Could Really Work In Education

http://www.edudemic.com/open-badges-in-education/

Higher education institutions are abuzz with the concept of Open Badges. The concept was presented to SCSU CETL some two years ago, but it remained mute on the SCSU campus. Part of the presentation to the SCSU CETL included the assertion that “Some advocates have suggested that badges representing learning and skills acquired outside the classroom, or even in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), will soon supplant diplomas and course credits.”

For higher education institutions interested in keeping pace, establishing a digital ecosystem around badges to recognize college learning, skill development and achievement is less a threat and more an opportunity. Used properly, Open Badge systems help motivate, connect, articulate and make transparent the learning that happens inside and outside classrooms during a student’s college years.

Educational programs that use learning design to attach badges to educational experiences according to defined outcomes can streamline credit recognition.

The badge ecosystem isn’t just a web-enabled transcript, CV, and work portfolio rolled together. It’s also a way to structure the process of education itself. Students will be able to customize learning goals within the larger curricular framework, integrate continuing peer and faculty feedback about their progress toward achieving those goals, and tailor the way badges and the metadata within them are displayed to the outside world.

 

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