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Greensboro presentation

Please develop a one hour workshop for faculty on using a new (or old but new to them) technology tool. The aim is not to only show the technical operation, but the pedagogical use of the tool helping faculty think about what this might mean in their own teaching.

Short link: : http://bit.ly/UNCGpres

Alternatives to the pedagogical use of BYOD

Who: students, faculty and staff
Where: TBD
When: Friday, June 17, 2016. 10-11:30 AM

announcement

5 min introduction of workshop presenter Plamen Miltenoff and workshop participants

5 min plan of the workshop

5 min introduction to the topic:

Outline
In financially-sparse times for educational institutions, one viable way to save money is by rethinking pedagogy/methodology and adapt it to the burgeoning numbers of mobile devices (BYOD) owned by students, faculty and staff.

In 5 min,
we will be playing a game, using Kahoot (https://kahoot.it). Kahoot is an application from Norway, which is increasingly popular in K12 and gradually picking momentum at higher ed.

Why Kahoot and not any of the other similar polling apps (AKA formative assessment tools), such as PollEverywhere, PollDaddy etc. (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/13/formative-assessment-tools/)?
1. Kahoot has gained momentum; at least one third of your undergraduates have used it in high school and are familiar with the interface.
2. I personally like Kahoot for the kahoots. J
3. I like badges as “badges in gamification.” Let me know, if you want to work on this topic some other time and lets schedule work time after this session (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges).

In 10-15 min,
lets try to create an account and build our first kahoot (https://getkahoot.com/). You can use any topic and focus on the features, which Kahoot provides. Split in groups and help each other; if you feel stuck, please let me know and I will do my best to help advance further.
Here are two YouTube lectures how to create an account and a kahoot quiz (5 min) and how to play a kahoot (3 min): http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/13/how-to-kahoot/

In 5-10 min,

let’s display 1-2 kahoot’s to the entire audience and think about situations, when and where such kahoots can be used for educational purposes.
Let’s think about the implications, which the use of kahoots on BOYD may trigger in the classroom

Let’s think about the preparation needed for the smooth use of the kahoots (is your WiFi in that particular classroom robust enough to hold the action of 20? 200? Students?
Let’s think about students’ engagement: what constitutes it? would a kahoot on their BYOD will be sufficient to pick their interest and if not, what else must be added to the magic elixir?

In 5 min, lets discuss Kahoot’s similarities with other educational technologies used in the classroom

Let’s assess the potential of Kahoot.
how does it compare
how does it transfer
is it compatible with Canvas

Gamification, personalization and continued education

Gamification, personalization and continued education are trending in edtech

Free Tech Instruction (About Us)

>>>Fall 2019 workshops IMS instruction technology sessions<<<

Student’s relationship with technology is complex. They recognize its value but still need guidance when it comes to better using it for academics. Educause’s ECAR Study, 2013

InforMedia Services

IMS faculty would be happy to meet with you or your group at your convenience.
Please request using this Google Form: http://scsu.mn/1OjBMf9 or
by email: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu | informedia@stcloudstate.edu
Here is the evaluation form: http://bit.ly/imseval

How you can reach us:

Services we provide:

  • Instruct and collaborate with faculty, staff and students on specific computer, Cloud and mobile applications
  • Assist faculty in course design and instruction to incorporate SCSU’s resources
  • Join faculty in the classroom instructional design to assist students with learning technology application for the class
  • Consult with faculty on instructional design issues, particularly those that use the World Wide Web, multimedia techniques and interactivity
  • Collaborate with faculty, staff and students on technology-related projects
  • Work with campus units in technology planning and acquisition
  • Respond to faculty, staff and students requests and technology developments

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Desire2Learn (D2L), Digital literacy, digital photography, e-learning, educational technology, gamification, gaming, image editing, interactive apps, learning, lecture capture, Millennials, mobile apps, mobile apps, mobile devices, mobile learning, MOOC, online learning, Photoshop, podcasting, programming languages, smartboard, social media, teaching, technology, technology literacy, video editing, virtualization, web conferencing platform, web development, web editing

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analytics in education

ACRL e-Learning webcast series: Learning Analytics – Strategies for Optimizing Student Data on Your Campus

This three-part webinar series, co-sponsored by the ACRL Value of Academic Libraries Committee, the Student Learning and Information Committee, and the ACRL Instruction Section, will explore the advantages and opportunities of learning analytics as a tool which uses student data to demonstrate library impact and to identify learning weaknesses. How can librarians initiate learning analytics initiatives on their campuses and contribute to existing collaborations? The first webinar will provide an introduction to learning analytics and an overview of important issues. The second will focus on privacy issues and other ethical considerations as well as responsible practice, and the third will include a panel of librarians who are successfully using learning analytics on their campuses.

Webcast One: Learning Analytics and the Academic Library: The State of the Art and the Art of Connecting the Library with Campus Initiatives
March 29, 2016

Learning analytics are used nationwide to augment student success initiatives as well as bolster other institutional priorities.  As a key aspect of educational reform and institutional improvement, learning analytics are essential to defining the value of higher education, and academic librarians can be both of great service to and well served by institutional learning analytics teams.  In addition, librarians who seek to demonstrate, articulate, and grow the value of academic libraries should become more aware of how they can dovetail their efforts with institutional learning analytics projects.  However, all too often, academic librarians are not asked to be part of initial learning analytics teams on their campuses, despite the benefits of library inclusion in these efforts.  Librarians can counteract this trend by being conversant in learning analytics goals, advantages/disadvantages, and challenges as well as aware of existing examples of library successes in learning analytics projects.

Learn about the state of the art in learning analytics in higher education with an emphasis on 1) current models, 2) best practices, 3) ethics, privacy, and other difficult issues.  The webcast will also focus on current academic library projects and successes in gaining access to and inclusion in learning analytics initiatives on their campus.  Benefit from the inclusion of a “short list” of must-read resources as well as a clearly defined list of ways in which librarians can leverage their skills to be both contributing members of learning analytics teams, suitable for use in advocating on their campuses.

my notes:

open academic analytics initiative
https://confluence.sakaiproject.org/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=75671025

where data comes from:

  • students information systems (SIS)
  • LMS
  • Publishers
  • Clickers
  • Video streaming and web conferencing
  • Surveys
  • Co-curricular and extra-curricular involvement

D2L degree compass
Predictive Analytics Reportitng PAR – was open, but just bought by Hobsons (https://www.hobsons.com/)

Learning Analytics

IMS Caliper Enabled Services. the way to connect the library in the campus analytics https://www.imsglobal.org/activity/caliperram

student’s opinion of this process
benefits: self-assessment, personal learning, empwerment
analytics and data privacy – students are OK with harvesting the data (only 6% not happy)
8 in 10 are interested in personal dashboard, which will help them perform
Big Mother vs Big Brother: creepy vs helpful. tracking classes, helpful, out of class (where on campus, social media etc) is creepy. 87% see that having access to their data is positive

librarians:
recognize metrics, assessment, analytics, data. visualization, data literacy, data science, interpretation

INSTRUCTION DEPARTMENT – N.B.

determine who is the key leader: director of institutional research, president, CIO

who does analyics services: institutional research, information technology, dedicated center

analytic maturity: data drivin, decision making culture; senior leadership commitment,; policy supporting (data ollection, accsess, use): data efficacy; investment and resourcefs; staffing; technical infrastrcture; information technology interaction

student success maturity: senior leader commited; fudning of student success efforts; mechanism for making student success decisions; interdepart collaboration; undrestanding of students success goals; advising and student support ability; policies; information systems

developing learning analytics strategy

understand institutional challenges; identify stakeholders; identify inhibitors/challenges; consider tools; scan the environment and see what other done; develop a plan; communicate the plan to stakeholders; start small and build

ways librarians can help
idenfify institu partners; be the partners; hone relevant learning analytics; participate in institutional analytics; identify questions and problems; access and work to improve institu culture; volunteer to be early adopters;

questions to ask: environmental scanning
do we have a learning analytics system? does our culture support? leaders present? stakeholders need to know?

questions to ask: Data

questions to ask: Library role

learning analytics & the academic library: the state of the art of connecting the library with campus initiatives

questions:
pole analytics library

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

literature

causation versus correlation studies. speakers claims that it is difficult to establish causation argument. institutions try to predict as accurately as possible via correlation, versus “if you do that it will happen what.”

++++++++++++

More on analytics in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=analytics&submit=Search

digital humanities for librarians

Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: April 4-29, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/112-digital-humanities.php

Digital humanities (DH) has been heralded as the next big thing in humanities scholarship and universities have been creating initiatives and new positions in this field. Libraries, too, have moved to create a presence in the digital humanities community, setting up centers and hiring librarians to staff them. This course is designed as an introduction for librarians or library school students who have little or no exposure to DH and wish to be better positioned to offer DH support or services in a library setting. Participants will read and discuss DH scholarship, learn about frequently-used software, and think about why and how libraries and librarians engage DH. While I will encourage participants to explore more complex computing approaches (and I will support those who do as best I can), this course does not presuppose computing skills such as programming or use of the command line and will not ask participants to do much more than upload files to websites or install and use simple programs. Participants should have an interest and background in humanities scholarship and humanities librarianship and while the readings will focus on activities in the United States, our discussions can be more geographically wide-ranging.

Objectives:

– A basic knowledge of what digital humanities is and how it effects scholarship in the humanities disciplines.

– Exposure to core tools and approaches used by digital humanists.

– An understanding of how libraries and librarians have been involved with digital humanities.

– Critical engagement with the role of librarians and libraries in digital humanities.

This class has a follow-up, Introduction to Text Encoding

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/133-text-encoding.php

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.”

Read an interview with John Russell about this class:

http://libraryjuiceacademy.com/news/?p=769

You can register in this course through the first week of instruction (as long as it is not full). The “Register” button on the website goes to our credit card payment gateway, which may be used with personal or institutional credit cards. (Be sure to use the appropriate billing address). If your institution wants us to send a billing statement or wants to pay using a purchase order, please contact us by email to make arrangements: inquiries@libraryjuiceacademy.com

Introduction to Text Encoding

Instructor: John Russell

Dates: May 2-27, 2016

Credits: 1.5 CEUs

Price: $175

This course will introduce students to text encoding according to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Guidelines. Why should you care about text encoding or the TEI Guidelines? The creation of digital scholarly texts is a core part of the digital humanities and many digital humanities grants and publications require encoding texts in accordance with the TEI Guidelines. Students in this course will learn about the use-cases for text encoding and get a basic introduction to the principles of scholarly editing before moving on to learning some XML basics and creating a small-scale TEI project using the XML editor oXygen. We will not cover (beyond the very basics) processing TEI, and students interested in learning about XSLT and/or XQuery should turn to the LJA courses offered on those subjects. Participants should have some experience with digital humanities, as this course is intended as a follow up to the Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians course.

Objectives:

  • A basic understanding of digital scholarly editing as an academic activity.
  • Knowledge of standard TEI elements for encoding poetry and prose.
  • Some engagement with more complex encoding practices, such as working with manuscripts.
  • An understanding of how librarians have participated in text encoding.
  • Deeper engagement with digital humanities practices.

John Russell is the Associate Director of the Center for Humanities and Information at Pennsylvania State University. He has been actively involved in digital humanities projects, primarily related to text encoding, and has taught courses and workshops on digital humanities methods, including “Introduction to Digital Humanities for Librarians.” Interview with John Russell

Course Structure

This is an online class that is taught asynchronously, meaning that participants do the work on their own time as their schedules allow. The class does not meet together at any particular times, although the instructor may set up optional synchronous chat sessions. Instruction includes readings and assignments in one-week segments. Class participation is in an online forum environment.

++++++++++++++++++++++++

Spatial Data Analyst & Curator

University Libraries / U-Spatial

University of Minnesota

 

Overview

The University of Minnesota Libraries and U-Spatial (https://uspatial.umn.edu/) seek a knowledgeable and proactive Spatial Data Analyst & Curator to advance the Libraries’ efforts in the areas of geospatial projects, geospatial data curation and management, and digital spatial humanities. Residing in the John R. Borchert Map Library, the Spatial Data Analyst & Curator works under the management and direction of the University Libraries, which holds institutional responsibility for supporting the products and processes of scholarship through the collection, provisioning, and preservation of information resources in all formats and media. As such, the work of the Spatial Data Analyst & Curator uses a life-cycle data management approach to serve the specific needs of the spatial data creator/user community while ensuring that processes and methods employed are strongly aligned with enterprise strategies and systems.

Required Qualifications include a Master’s degree in library/information science from an American Library Association accredited library school, GIS-related field, or equivalent combination of advanced degree and relevant experience, as well as experience with geographical information systems, including/especially Esri’s ArcGIS software, experience with scripting languages, such as Python or JavaScript, and experience with metadata creation, schema, and management.

 

For complete description, qualifications and to apply, go to: http://z.umn.edu/ulib362

 

The University of Minnesota is an Equal Opportunity Educator and Employer.

 

 

Ryan Mattke

Head, John R. Borchert Map Library

University of Minnesota
S-76 Wilson Library

309 19th Ave South

Minneapolis, MN 55455

Email: matt0089@umn.edu

Web: http://www.lib.umn.edu/borchert

Phone: 612.624.5757
ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8816-9289

social media as a source

When social media are your source

http://www.informationr.net/ir/18-3/colis/paperC41.html#.VuwOInpa2zA

Paul Scifleet
Charles Sturt University, School of Information Studies, Chalres Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia
Maureen Henninger
Information & Knowledge Management Program, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
Kathryn H. Albright
Charles Sturt University, School of Information Studies, Chalres Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia

The view we bring to this study is one of documentary practice as the set of techniques, including processes for the selection, synthesis and interpretation of the material form of documents and their content, meaning and context, that librarianship brings to the organization and management of knowledge (Briet, 2006; Pédauque, 2003). Current emphases in social media research on ‘big data’ and quantitative analysis are distracting from the significant role social media have to play as a record of social significance that should be brought into public custody for future use.

In its multiple manifestations, social media are “a new kind of cultural artefact” (Lyman and Kahle, 1998, para 15), as was the World Wide Web when Brewster Kahle set up the Internet Archive, reasoning that “in future it may provide the raw material for a carefully indexed, searchable library” (Kahle, 1997, p. 82).
My note: what the German start promoting in the 60s as Alltagsgeschichte.

https://gnip.com/sources/

the possibility of selective acquisition and management of social media, as a document of specific events and topics, as an alternative to the Library of Congress’s whole-of-archive approach with Twitter.

Social network platforms for HigherEd

Social network platforms for HigherEd

Excellent discussion on the blend-online listserv on :

Can anyone recommend a good social network platform, preferably Cloud-based, that could be used to facilitate substantive organic communication and collaboration among past, present and future students on a handful of online and blended learning programs?

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Robert Tousignant
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 11:50 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

 

Also, as mentioned in my previous post, Schoology (http://www.schoology.com) offers an LMS with a modern social media interface and integrations with Facebook, Microsoft OneDrive, etc… you might want to add it to the list as well.

Bes,

Bob

From: Victoria Cardullo <vmc0004@AUBURN.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 12:37 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU” <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

I added both thanks for the update and clarification.

 Facebook Group “Groups for Schools” feature today which will allow American colleges to create Group pages accessible only within the school community.
 LinkedIn LinkedIn is a business-oriented social networking service. Founded in December 2002 and launched on May 5, 2003, it is mainly used for professional networking.
 K-12 Edmodo Edmodo is a social networking site for teachers and students where over 46 million teachers, students, and parents are connecting to collaborate on assignments, discover new resources. Edmodo is a web 2.0 social networking tool for educators to use to communicate with students and parents.
 Microsoft OneDrive  A file hosting service that allows users to upload and sync files to a cloud storage and then access them from a Web browser or their local device.
 12manage.com A free management education and business education platform for management and organization of business or education.
 Yammer Yammer a private social network collaboration software and business applications that allows the user to connect to the right people, share information across teams and organize around projects.
Celly Celly is a platform for ad-hoc social networks that is accessible via iPhone, Android, Web, SMS text and even email. Networks connect individuals and communities for instant and easy communication.
Jive Jive is a communication and collaboration platform solution for business. Jive enables employees, partners and customers to work together.
 Twitter Twitter is a powerhouse for marketing, communication, business, and even education, letting people from around the world work together, share ideas, and gain exposure to concepts.
 Google+ Communities Google+ is a place to connect with friends and family, and explore interests. Google+ allows the user to share photos, send messages, and stay in touch with the people globally.
Hive Social Hive Social is a specialist Social Media consultancy, that helps businesses and brands find, connect, build and engage with their online audience through Social Media and Digital Marketing.
Enterprise Hive HiveSocial for higher education is an enterprise social software, communication and collaboration platform with embedded game mechanics
Socialtext Socialtext applies Web 2.0 technologies such as enterprise microblogging, enterprise social networking and wikis to the critical challenges facing businesses. Socialtext’s platform allows employees to share expertise, speed workflows, and get their jobs done faster.
 Elgg  Elgg an open source social networking software that provides individuals and organizations with the components needed to create an online social environment. It offers blogging, microblogging, file sharing, networking, and groups

Dr. Victoria Cardullo

Auburn University

Assistant Reading Professor

Curriculum and Teaching

vmc0004@auburn.edu

334-844-6882

“Learning is finding out what you already know, Doing is demonstrating that you know it, Teaching is reminding others that they know it as well as you do. We are all learners, doers, and teachers.”

—  Richard David Bach

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [BLEND-ONLINE@listserv.educause.edu] on behalf of Kampmann, David L [David.Kampmann@SOUTHEASTTECH.EDU]
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 3:02 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@listserv.educause.edu
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

A Facebook group is probably the quickest, easiest, and will give you the best engagement. Data shows that in the under 25 age group, Facebook groups is still popular.

If you were trying to reach mainly current and future, I would shift to LinkedIn.

All of those other social networks and white label networks require people to remember another log in, site, and place to check and update. You might get good engagement up front, but it will deteriorate.

David Kampmann, M.S. in Ed, CFD | Southeast Technical Institute

Instructional Facilitator | p: (605) 367-5531 | @mrkampmann

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 11:07 AM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: [BLEND-ONLINE] Social network platforms for HigherEd

 

Can anyone recommend a good social network platform, preferably Cloud-based, that could be used to facilitate substantive organic communication and collaboration among past, present and future students on a handful of online and blended learning programs?

 

I am familiar with Google+ Communities, Yammer, Jive and Socialtext, but I am wondering if there are other solutions worth investigating. Facebook at Work might be a possibility, but it is too early to tell. Elgg is also a viable option, especially, a hosted Elgg instance, but identifying a fully functional, customizable and super easy to use and administrate Cloud-first solution is most desirable.

 

Thank you very much.

— Ed Garay

University of Illinois at Chicago

http://www.twitter.com/garay

google.com/+EdGaray

IPad.

 

password management

LITA listsrev has an excellent discussion on password management.
I personally am using LastPass for two years: great free option, paid one can be used on mobiles.

=========================

From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Michael J. Paulmeno
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 1:36 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: RE: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I second Keepass.  Not only is it free, open source, and multi-OS, but it lives on your computer, not in the cloud (although the database can be put on a shared drive or in DropBox for access across devices).  Personally that makes me feel much safer.  There are clients available for Windows, Mac, Linux, IPhone, Android and even Blackberry.

 

Cheers,

Mike

 

From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Ronald Houk
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:38 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I use lastpass as well.  However, LastPass was just bought by LogMeIn, so lots of people are holding their breath hoping that things stay good.  Another open source, multi-os, alternative is keepass (keepass.info)

 

On Wed, Jan 6, 2016 at 11:43 AM, Yvonne Reed <yvonner@ranchomiragelibrary.org> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I would like offer or recommend a password management tool to my library staff that’s reliable and easy to use. Do any of you have one you can recommend?

 

 

Thank you,

 

Yvonne Reed

Technology Librarian

Rancho Mirage Public Library

71-100 Hwy 111

Rancho Mirage, CA 92270

(760)341-7323 x770
————————————–

From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of O’English, Lorena
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:51 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: RE: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I really like Dashlane (dashlane.com) – it has a lot of options, including the ability to give someone else access to your passwords in certain situations (plus, they support Firefox financially via low-impact ads). I think of this sometimes when I think about what would happen if a piano fell on me tomorrow – what a mess it would be for my spouse to cope with my digital life! That said, although I use Dashlane, I still have not quite managed to get myself to use all its functionality.

 

Lorena

***

Washington State University Libraries

oenglish@wsu.edu

wsulorena: Twitter, Skype, GTalk, Yahoo IM

———–

—–Original Message—–
From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of Cary Gordon
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:37 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: Re: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

1Password ++

————–

 

—–Original Message—–
From: lita-l-request@lists.ala.org [mailto:lita-l-request@lists.ala.org] On Behalf Of COLLINS, MATTHEW
Sent: Wednesday, January 06, 2016 12:35 PM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: RE: [lita-l] Question on password management

 

I have used Roboform for at least 10 years and never had a problem.  It manages passwords for logins and bookmarks on my PCs, my iPhone and iPad.  It synchs online so work, home, tablet and phone all have the same info.  It also stores personal info (name & multiple addresses) and confidential notes and other info.

 

–Matthew

———————-

Has anyone mentioned Password Safe? http://passwordsafe.sourceforge.net/

 

It’s worked well for organizing and managing usernames/passwords.

 

 

Angela Stangl

 

Digital Services Coordinator

Rodney A. Briggs Library

University of Minnesota, Morris

(320) 589-6164

——————————-

FEATURES

http://keepass.info/features.html

 

PLUGINS

http://keepass.info/plugins.html

Note: CAPS is used here and there to call attention without extra Gmail formatting, not to shout at anyone. Still…I know I look like I yell here. I have flogged myself, I will now bathe in the River Salt.

 

MWoT

Ok, check it out.

Plugins, macros, group/profile/source/target/timing locks, separate DBs and separate metadata for these if you like, INTERNALLY-ROTATING SUPERKEYS via REGULAR KEY TRANSORMATIONS and TWO-CHANNEL AUTO-TYPE OBFUSCATION (for obfuscating your auto-typed passwords or keys, if you select Auto)….!!!…

…and well-reasoned, well-EXPLAINED approaches to certain critical areas of password management in general and to KeePass in particular.

 

For instance: In the FAQ, read the logic breakdown (thought-by-thought explanation) of why Keepass does NOT lock itself when a SUB-dialogue box is open in Keepass whle the user then LOCKS the workstation. =)

Why doesn’t KeePass lock when Windows locks and a KeePass sub-dialog is open?

http://keepass.info/help/base/faq_tech.html#noautolock

My support of Keepass as a primary, then a close alternative, comes from four of my six years in IT being in direct computer and network security roles. Sure, not the most trench years out there, but they are all engineering and tiered-analyst roles for several major US corporations.

I’m proud of that…and in terms of relevance, I worked – and still work – with and around many engineers, analysts, and scientists (data, algorithmic). I look up to these people a great deal, and many of these coworkers come fully assembled having forgotten more than I’ll ever know and still learning faster than I could ever talk about… and even THEY use Keepass and they use it powerfully.

Detection of each site’s contact (HTTP GET, form forcus, etc) or “touch” can be different with each browser it integrates into, and that’s just for starters. One can also script up a different timing to use before the credentials are passed….;)….one can also relegate references to a central database, or one can refer only to the local system or even just a specific profile that can access said .kdbx file (KeePass database), or one can limit the data source to just one .kdbx single-instance database file, or one can use the .kdbx as a secondary for some other central repository failure, if that happens.

One can make several .kdbx files for different uses…no requirement to have just one! Each a diffferent base of unique data keys, each wtih a different direction administered on when it is referenced, how it is run, and where it lives on a system.

Aaaaaand it can integrate with other DBMs, it’s not an island!

Keepass is not the end-all be-all, but it IS FOSS (Free and Open-Source Software, great for investigating its machinery). Also it is:

Programmable (via the Plugins model, you can write some yourself if you like!)

Modularizable (again, via the Plugins model)

Profile lockable, (<— really neat!)

– SMM (Secure Memory Manageable, for Windows Clipboard and the like)

– and more!

Anyway, Keepass is rad for its cost, but, like the others on this thread, I will second LastPass as well. LastPass  is a an alternative to Keepass. =)

Daniel Strickland
linkedin.com/in/dwstrickland

 

 

Matthew Collins

Director of the Ernest Miller White Library Associate Professor of Research and Bibliography Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary

1044 Alta Vista Road

Louisville, KY 40205

mcollins@lpts.edu| 502.992.5420

 

convocation winter 2016

Short link the information below on the IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?p=4441 and even shorter one: http://scsu.mn/1RsQErr

Weds 6th

Session I 10-11:15         Voyageurs North (Atwood)

Title
Engage your students: connect CMS (D2L) to social media to enhance the learning process.

Plamen Miltenoff and Emil Towner

Join us online via Adobe Connect: http://scsuconnect.stcloudstate.edu/ims (please login as a “guest” and use your real name)

Outline

In this rapid succession of examples, one can experience a showcase how to enhance students’ engagement by modernizing D2L experience through connection with social media. Bring your own examples and participate in a discussion, which aims finding the right tools for your class and field of study.

Audience:
beginners to advanced

Prerequisite:
come with your own social media accounts: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine

Outcomes:

By the end of this session, the participants will have an idea about peculiarity of each of the social media tools: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Vine

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with the integration of each of the social media tool into D2L

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent each particular tool fits their field of study

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to compare the pedagogical advantages and disadvantages of the social media tools compared to D2L

Useful links to contact us via social media:
IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims
IMS Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl
IMS Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc
IMS Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/scsutechnology/
IMS Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct
IMS YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA
IMS Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub
IMS LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

Plan – Plamen Miltenoff:

 Please consider the following survey about your opinion regarding social media in education:

*http://aidemoreto.polldaddy.com/s/social-media-in-education*
please have the short link: http://scsu.mn/1Z8EFFx

most recent contemplations about blogs and social media in general:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/01/4507/

  • D2L and Vine
    Vine is a social media services, which provides the ability to share 7 sec videos. Vine is becoming more popular then Instagram (15 sec videos), with the simplicity to create short videos. Students can take sequence of short videos, which amount to 7 sec to reflect the main points of a project. E.g.: chemical reaction, biology dissection, progress of engineering planning, solving a math formula.
    URL to the vine can be posted in the D2L discussion area for further collaborative effort or for peers’ and instructions evaluation
    Vines are a click away from a FB group page or, with the right handle and hashtag, to a Twitter discussion
    The bottom-line to evaluate if fitting your field of study is: can the content be narrated or is it much better if visualized. If the latter, Vine can be your salvation.
    How to Create Social Videos With Your Smartphone http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/01/10/social-videos-with-your-smartphone/
  • D2L and YouTube, EdPuzzle (https://edpuzzle.com/), etc
    YouTube Unveils New Trending Tab
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/13/improvements-in-social-media-tools/

    Per SCSU IT disclaimer: MediaSpace (Kaltura) is a free, cloud-based video repository solution for campus that allows faculty and staff to upload and distribute video and audio content for academic or administrative purposes. Facilitators will discuss potential uses of MediaSpace for campus, demonst rate how to create Webcam and screen recordings, upload audio/video, and embed or link to MediaSpace content from D2L or a web site.  YouTube is owned by Google and the integration, including statistics and analytics by Google are way beyond MediaSpace. The only selling point of MediaSpace is the FERPA requirement by MnSCU to host privacy data on a MnSCU owned server
  • Google+
    Google+ is indirect competition with any CMS, D2L included, with its GOogle Classroom platform (https://classroom.google.com/ineligible). K12 and higher institutions are outsourcing to GMAIL and with Google Hangouts (Skype also), one can share video, audio and desktops, which makes Adobe Connect + D2L way behind in integration even before Google Drive is mentioned.
    Google Introduces Shared Albums in Google Photos:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/12/13/improvements-in-social-media-tools/
    8 Ways to Use Google+ Hangouts for Your Business http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/23/google-hangouts/You can record hangouts directly to your YouTube channel for future use.For private Google+ Hangouts, choose Google+ Video Hangouts, which allow you to have up to 10 participants in a video chat that is accessible only to the people invited.

Plan – Emil Towner:

  1. General stats on integrating social media and things to consider
  1. Integrating LinkedIn Assignments
  1. Integrating Facebook Groups
  • I will show a couple of groups that I have used
  • I can also come up with an “exercise” that participants can do, just let me know: (1) if you want me to and (2) if participants are suppose to have a Facebook account that they can log into during the session

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Session K 2-3:15: 2PM Wed, Jan 8.  Location: CH455

Title
Engage your students: gaming and gamification in the learning process.

Outline

As part of the broader discussion, a short discussion segment to form and agree on definitions and terms regarding games and gamification. Another short segment to seek consensus if this SCSU campus is ready to departure on the path of gamifying education. After several examples, of how games are used in education and gamification techniques, a discussion on how gaming and gamification can be streamlined amidst shrinking budget and increasing workload. More details and information about gaming and gamification at: http://scsu.mn/1F008Re

Audience:
beginners to advanced

Outcomes:

By the end of this session, the participants will have a working definitions on play, games, serious games, game-based learning, digital game-based learning, gaming, gamification and badges. (more at http://scsu.mn/1F008Re)

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with the possibilities for integration of games in the educational process and for gamification of the educational process.

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent games and gamification fit their field of study

Plan:

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Friday 8th

Session M 10-11:15: CH 455

Title
Present and be presented: engage your students with modern ways to share information

Outline

Two trends plague education: the swamp of PowerPoint presentations and the lack of visual literacy. In this rapid succession of examples, one can experience a showcase of various cloud-based tools, which brings visual presentations way beyond PowerPoint and align with the Millennials demand for current social interaction. A discussion on how relevant these tools are to various disciplines and details on improving the interaction among instructors and students during the presentation. Ongoing discussion about design as part of visual literacy and the difference between blended learning and technology integration.

Audience:
beginners to advanced

Outcomes:

By the end of this session, the participants will have understand the movement “Death by PowerPoint” and will understand the advantage of cloud-based presentation tools to MS PowerPoint

By the end of the session, the participants will be familiar with several tools, which successfully replace PowerPoint and well beyond.

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to asses to what extent games and gamification fit their field of study

By the end of the session, the participants will be able to discriminate between technology integration and blended learning.

Plan:

 

Enabling BYOD

Enabling Bring Your Own Device

white paper by the Cisco

To help improve understanding of BYOD and its impacts on modern network environments, this white paper will further explore the many differences that exist between corporate and educational approaches to the technology.

In the education space, dealing with non-standard, user-managed devices has been and still remains the norm. Unfortunately, the variety of devices means a multitude of operating systems and software are encountered, with many “standards” being defined. As a result there is little consistency in the device type or the software being installed. Since the device is owned by the student and is a personal resource, it is often difficult or impossible to enforce a policy that prevents users from installing software. In addition, due to the nature of learning as opposed to a corporate environment, it is also difficult to put a restriction on certain classes of software since all may provide a worthwhile educational purpose.

providing a solution that unifies management and deployment polices across both wired and wireless devices is very desirable.

The Internet of Everything (IoE) has spurred a revolution in mobility. Collaboration anywhere, anytime and with any device is quickly becoming the rule instead of the exception. As a result it is now common for students to bring mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets and e-readers into the academic environment to support their educational endeavors.

The infrastructure supporting BYOD no longer has the sole purpose of providing a wireless radio signal within a given area. The focus is now about providing the appropriate bandwidth and quality to accommodate the ever-growing number of devices and ensure that an application provides a good end-user experience. In a sense, applications are now the major driving force behind the continuing evolution of BYOD. For example, a teacher accessing video in the classroom for educational purposes during class hours should have greater priority than a student in the same area accessing a gaming site for recreation.

A state-of-the-art BYOD infrastructure should now be capable of providing more than just generic, general-purpose wireless connectivity. In the classroom environment, the notion of “differentiated access” often resonates with faculty and staff. Once this has been determined, a policy can be applied to the user and their activity on the network.

Granular security can also be intelligently delivered.
Quality of Service (QoS) rate limiting has been available for some time, but now there are newer QoS techniques available.

Location-based services can provide their first interaction with the university. By delivering campus maps and directional information, location-enabled services can enhance the experience of these visitors and provide a positive image to them as well. As a visitor enters a particular building location, information could automatically be provided. In the case of a visiting student, information about the history of a building, departments contained within the building, or other resources could be presented to enhance a guided tour, or provide the perspective student the ability to have a self-directed tour of the campus facilities.

802.11ac Technology (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11ac)

Software Defined Networking (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software-defined_networking)

 

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