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Midwest AV Summit

Midwest AV Summit

av summit 2015  2
 av summit  7
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Matthew Clay : Active Learning Spaces

partners across campus for IT/AV: CETL
What is the most important key for creating active learning spaces (ALS).

Mathew shared his work with CETL and his understanding of the importance of faculty being brought to the table. Faculty as equal stakeholder in the process.

In a conversation with him after the presentation, he agreed that faculty must be the leading force in in generating ideas what new technology and how to implement technology in the classroom. He agreed that at the present IT/AV staff is the leading force and this is a corrupt statuquo

 

key partnerships:
faculty and academic affairs, students, facilities, architects, engineers, contractors, furniture vendors, IT (networking, support instructional design)

challanges: ITS mindset (conservative), Administration must be on board (money), Funding.

MnSCU is not Google friendly. 60% of the staff is not doing the same tasks as 3 years ago.

Open about challenges, sharing more with faculty. Nice to hear this, but the communication must be much larger, to the point when faculty are equal partners in a relationship, which is not far from equal decision making. 

If faculty is not considered a REAL stakeholder (versus intimated body in a meeting which is controlled by IT people), the entire technology use goes down the drain. Faculty is much stronger relationship with students then IT is with students. The presentation put weight on IT staff and its connection with students’ needs. It is questionable how IT staff can make stronger connection then faculty, who are in a daily contact with students.
The issue is how to assist faculty to catch up with the technology, not how IT staff to rival faculty in their connection with students. What faculty lacks in understanding of technology cannot be replaced by IT staff increasing interaction with students, but rather assisting faculty with coming to terms with technology.

maintaining innovation: fail fast and fail forward; keep up to date with technology (blank statement); always look for new furniture; focus on space design instead of just A/V; Challenge yourself with new ideas; always learn from your mistakes; always get feedback from students and faculty (again, the PERIPHERAL role of faculty. Is feedback all expected from faculty? It faculty and IT staff must be equal partners at the decision table. not faculty being consulted at decision made by IT staff)

Google Glass mentioned, Pebble watches. supposedly to understand students habits. Big data used to profiling students is very fashionable, but is it the egg in the basket?

they have 3d printer, Inoculus. Makerspace mentioned

examples how to use 3d printing for education (LRS archive collections, MN digital library).

the presenter kept asking if there are questions. it makes me wonder how far back (pedagogically or androgogically) IT staff must be to NOT consider backchanneling. Social media is not a novelty and harvesting opinions and questions using social media should not be neglected

 

digital classroom breakdown session

digital classroom breakdown session

Break down session: Digital Classroom

technical, very IT. I am not versed enough to draw impression on how it projects over real faculty work. HDMI cables.
relating to the previous presentation: I really appreciate the IT / AV staff handling all this information, which is complex and important; but during my 15 years tenure at SCSU I learned to be suspicious of when the complexity and the importance of the techy matter starts asserting itself as leading when the pedagogy in the classroom is determined.

HD flow and other hardware and software solutions

VLAN 3. lecture capture.

BYOD support in the classroom: about half of the room raised their hands.

Tech In 2015 and flops in 2014

What To Look Out For In Tech In 2015

 http://www.businessinsider.com/what-to-look-out-for-in-tech-in-2015-2014-12#ixzz3O0Jpgipy

Venmo, the peer-to-peer payments app, will offer a solution for in-store merchants.

By year-end 2015, more people will have used a smartphone to unlock their doors than will have used a mobile wallet. 

The Amazon Echo will succeed

YouTube will get a ‘social’ make-over

The Top Technology Failures of 2014

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/533546/the-top-technology-failures-of-2014/

Google Glass

(See “Google Glass Is Dead; Long Live Smart Glasses.”)

Brazil’s EEG Exoskeleton

(See “World Cup Mind-Control Demo Faces Deadlines, Critics.”)

Bitcoin

(See “Marginally Useful.”)

STAP Cells

(See coverage by the Los Angeles Times and by Nature.)

Sapphire iPhone Screens

(See “Why Apple Failed to Make Sapphire iPhones.”)

Aereo’s Tiny Antennas

Wearable technologies

Wearable technologies survey – win an iPad Mini

You are invited to participate in a study of the current and potential applications of wearable technologies such as Google Glasses in Higher Education. If you choose to participate you will be asked to complete a confidential online survey that explores your knowledge and beliefs surrounding the educational applications of wearable technologies. The questionnaire contains a combination of short answer and Likert-scale questions, including background information about yourself and your teaching career/experience, your perceptions of wearable technologies, your ideas about use cases and potential avenues of future research.

The survey should take approximately 10 to 15 minutes to complete. You are in no way obliged to take part in this survey, but if you do you can go into a draw to win an iPad mini.

If you are interested or would like more information please follow the link below.

https://mqedu.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_cwsQOzPjSo4zAep

Many thanks to those who participate and if you have any colleagues who would be interested in this study then please forward this email on to them.

Best wishes,

Matt

Dr Matt Bower

School of Education

Rm C5A927 Macquarie University

NSW 2109 Australia

T: +61 2 98508626

W: http://www.educ.mq.edu.au/our_staff/dr_matt_bower/

New terms and issues: Virtual Reality, Sim Sickness, Postural Sway…

Virtual Reality’s Next Hurdle: Overcoming ‘Sim Sickness’

http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2014/08/05/338015854/virtual-realitys-next-hurdle-overcoming-sim-sickness

One problem is the resulting “postural sway,” or postural instability and hand-eye coordination challenges.

Additional reading: http://www.augmentedrealitytrends.com/virtual-reality/sim-sickness.html

my note: similar issues with Google Glass. Here is some more info on the issue:

Rethinking Motion Sickness

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/23/rethinking-motion-sickness/

Pls have other IMS blog entries on Google Glass

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=google+glass

 

Our future students: Augmented Reality in the Classroom (+ info about wearable tech)

Putting the World In Their Hands: Augmented Reality in the Classroom

The wink of an eye, the simple one-finger tactile swipe down — these are the sights, sounds, and kinesthetic gestures that are changing the context of modern learning.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/putting-the-world-in-their-hands-augmented-reality-in-the-classroom

Wearable technology

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wearable_technology
http://www.cbsnews.com/pictures/wearable-technology-ces-2014/10/
http://www.wired.com/2013/12/wearable-computers/http://www.forbes.com/sites/connieguglielmo/2014/02/12/the-case-against-wearables/ (Google Glass)

12 Embarrassing Gadgets And Apps You Should Stop Using

12 Embarrassing Gadgets And Apps You Should Stop Using

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/embarrassing-gadgets-2014-4?op=1#ixzz30I03rggb

Not sure if Google Glass will go into oblivion (but it might, considering that it ALSO tethers with a mobile device as the vanishing Blackberry tablet), but smart phones definitely are taking over.

 

LRS and mobile devices: Please join us in exploring…

Please join us in exploring our mobile devices.

Minutes from the April 23, 2014 meeting

Pamela, Greg, Rachel and Plamen met at 3pM in MC 205 and discussed:

  • ebooks
  • different OS and gadgets – iOS, Windows Surface, Android Galaxy, Kindle
    the differences. We determined that it is up to the user which one she/he prefers.
  • what can be frustrating
    Android – more difficult to organize. For an novice it is more difficult
  • WIndows Surface come with Office and Surface has a mouse pointer and USB port, which makes easy connect external mouse.
  • Pamela will buy different types of dongles (USB, VGA) for iOS, Android Galaxy and WIndows and they will be available to loan from the dean’s office.
  • Siri, consensus on the poor quality. Cortana on WIndows is to be seen. Somebody on campus using Siri to text. Google Now is the Siri equivalent.
  • Google Glass. waste of money? it has potential thought. battery is very limited. we are not sure if it connects to iPAD
  • meet once a month. ask what worked from the last group and what didn’t to determine what can be discussed. Carol Rose has an app for passwords. How many people do NOT have access to a mobile device. What people do here, work related stuff (email, notes, calendar).  A coordinator of this group monitoring free apps and suggesting to be tested in LRS. List from the former group with the apps for iOS, Android, Windows.

Log in your questions, suggestions and helpful information.

Plamen Miltenoff and Tom Hergert

InforMedia Services

informedia@stcloudstate.edu

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

trhergert@stcloudstate.edu

Contact us via social media:

IMS blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices?ref=hl

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Instagram: http://instagram.com/scsutechinstruct

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_UMIE5r6YB8KzTF5nZJFyA

Google +: https://plus.google.com/u/0/115966710162153290760/posts/p/pub

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/scsuinstructionaltechnology

 

Endgame for LinkedIn

The Endgame for LinkedIn Is Coming

Jack of all trades. LinkedIn had — and still has — multiple branded apps: Job Search, SlideShare, Learning, Recruiter, Sales Navigator and something call ‘Elevate”

Bad at integration and scaling. LinkedIn acquired many companies to introduce various services, but wasn’t so good at making them work.

Ads were expensive and user-unfriendly. Natalie Halimi, a marketer with 10 years of experience, wrote about LinkedIn ads back in July 2014. She used the headers “high CPC, poor dashboard, poor analysis” and concluded “ LinkedIn need to reassess their pricing strategy to provide better ROI for advertisers”.

Overvalued, full stop. Just before the plunge, LinkedIn shares were trading at 50x forward earnings. Twitter was at 30x, Facebook 34x and Google 21x. It was one of the most expensive stocks in tech.

When Microsoft introduced Office 365, it was to battle Google’s G Suite which appealed to smaller businesses with its cheaper pricing and cloud-based subscription model.

It is succeeding. According to a 2018 Bitglass survey, Office 365’s global market share has gone up to 56.3% from 7.7% in just four years. G Suite has stayed at about 25% since 2016.
LinkedIn’s employees were actually using G suite — the whole bag: Gmail, Calendar, Drive, Hangouts, Docs, Sheets… — before the Microsoft acquisition.

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more on LinkedIn in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=linkedin

AI and privacy

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It: It’s taken 3 billion images from the internet to build a an AI driven database that allows US law enforcement agencies identify any stranger. from r/Futurology

Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy. Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so; in 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.” Some large cities, including San Francisco, have barred police from using facial

But without public scrutiny, more than 600 law enforcement agencies have started using Clearview in the past year, according to the company, which declined to provide a list. recognition technology.

Facial recognition technology has always been controversial. It makes people nervous about Big Brother. It has a tendency to deliver false matches for certain groups, like people of color. And some facial recognition products used by the police — including Clearview’s — haven’t been vetted by independent experts.

Clearview deployed current and former Republican officials to approach police forces, offering free trials and annual licenses for as little as $2,000. Mr. Schwartz tapped his political connections to help make government officials aware of the tool, according to Mr. Ton-That.

“We have no data to suggest this tool is accurate,” said Clare Garvie, a researcher at Georgetown University’s Center on Privacy and Technology, who has studied the government’s use of facial recognition. “The larger the database, the larger the risk of misidentification because of the doppelgänger effect. They’re talking about a massive database of random people they’ve found on the internet.”

Law enforcement is using a facial recognition app with huge privacy issues Clearview AI’s software can find matches in billions of internet images. from r/technology

Part of the problem stems from a lack of oversight. There has been no real public input into adoption of Clearview’s software, and the company’s ability to safeguard data hasn’t been tested in practice. Clearview itself remained highly secretive until late 2019.

The software also appears to explicitly violate policies at Facebook and elsewhere against collecting users’ images en masse.

while there’s underlying code that could theoretically be used for augmented reality glasses that could identify people on the street, Ton-That said there were no plans for such a design.

Banning Facial Recognition Isn’t Enough from r/technology

In May of last year, San Francisco banned facial recognition; the neighboring city of Oakland soon followed, as did Somerville and Brookline in Massachusetts (a statewide ban may follow). In December, San Diego suspended a facial recognition program in advance of a new statewide law, which declared it illegal, coming into effect. Forty major music festivals pledged not to use the technology, and activists are calling for a nationwide ban. Many Democratic presidential candidates support at least a partial ban on the technology.

facial recognition bans are the wrong way to fight against modern surveillance. Focusing on one particular identification method misconstrues the nature of the surveillance society we’re in the process of building. Ubiquitous mass surveillance is increasingly the norm. In countries like China, a surveillance infrastructure is being built by the government for social control. In countries like the United States, it’s being built by corporations in order to influence our buying behavior, and is incidentally used by the government.

People can be identified at a distance by their heart beat or by their gait, using a laser-based system. Cameras are so good that they can read fingerprints and iris patterns from meters away. And even without any of these technologies, we can always be identified because our smartphones broadcast unique numbers called MAC addresses.

China, for example, uses multiple identification technologies to support its surveillance state.

There is a huge — and almost entirely unregulated — data broker industry in the United States that trades on our information.

This is why many companies buy license plate data from states. It’s also why companies like Google are buying health records, and part of the reason Google bought the company Fitbit, along with all of its data.

The data broker industry is almost entirely unregulated; there’s only one law — passed in Vermont in 2018 — that requires data brokers to register and explain in broad terms what kind of data they collect.

The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It from r/technews

Until now, technology that readily identifies everyone based on his or her face has been taboo because of its radical erosion of privacy. Tech companies capable of releasing such a tool have refrained from doing so; in 2011, Google’s chairman at the time said it was the one technology the company had held back because it could be used “in a very bad way.” Some large cities, including San Francisco, have barred police from using facial recognition technology.

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on social credit system in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+credit

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