Archive of ‘learning’ category

360 degree camera

Virtual Reality to Drive Rapid Adoption of 360 Degree Cameras

By David Nagel

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/08/31/virtual-reality-to-drive-rapid-adoption-of-360-degree-cameras.aspx

VR’s applications for education have been much lauded, and tech heavyweights have begun investing in the technology, in part to both enable and capitalize on educational opportunities. Google, for example, has been offering its low-cost Google Cardboard kits, which, coupled with the Google Expeditions service, provides VR-based educational experiences and learning activities.

according to market research firm ABI Research, some 6 million consumer and prosumer cameras are expected to ship by 2021. (That’s out of a total of 70 million VR devices that are forecast to ship by then.)

 

Alphabet Nest and Android

Alphabet is breaking up Nest, its standalone smart-home gadgets company, and moving Nest’s software group back into Google.

enerally speaking, Google has very limited interest in making hardware in the first place. The cost of building things is high, the margins are low, and Google’s real specialty is in web services like Gmail and search anyway.

Google started signaling that Android, the most popular operating system in the world, and Chrome OS, its more niche operating system for laptops, were going to get smashed together. The result, ideally, will be a version of Android that can extend its smartphone dominance to tablets and laptops…which is why Android 7.0, the most recent release, makes split-screen multitasking such a tentpole feature.

the real business opportunity for Google is to compel a broad range of companies to create gadgets and home appliances using its software. The hardware is secondary. In fact, building its own hardware can even work against Google: The more successful Google is at selling its own hardware, the less likely other hardware makers want to use its software, since they view Google as a competitor.

Putting all its efforts behind expanding and extending Android has made Google a top player in the smartphone market, even after its late start against Apple and the iPhone.

The Journal of Emerging Learning Design special issue: The Digital Humanities

Call for Papers
The Journal of Emerging Learning Design special issue: The Digital Humanities

Submissions due date

On/before November 14, 2016.

Editors
Jerry Alan Fails (Boise State University) and AJ Kelton (Montclair State University)

Introduction
The Journal of Emerging Learning Design is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for its first Special Issue: The Digital Humanities.

With roots reaching back as far as 1940, the term Digital Humanities came into wide usage in late 2012 and has slowly risen in popularity since then. A Google Scholar search for “digital humanities” yields just under 30 results during the year 2000 and over 4,700 during 2015.  The increase in the number of published articles in 15 years is second only to the diversity of the research that is included.

About the ELDj

The Journal of Emerging Learning Design (ELDj) is an open access, peer-reviewed, online journal that provides a platform for academics and practitioners to explore emerging learning design theories, concepts, and issues and their implications at national and international levels.

An outgrowth of the annual Emerging Learning Design Conference, which makes its home at Montclair State University (MSU), the ELDj invites scholarly communication in the emerging learning design field and will present best practices in design and implementation by offering articles that present, propose, or review engaging and dynamic approaches to pedagogy and how technology can better enhance it.

More details can be found at http://eldj.montclair.edu/about/

About the Special Issue

The ELDj has purposefully kept the focus of the theme for this special issue broad.  The intent is to continue to break down traditional academic silos and allow for an open dialogue and sharing with respect to what is considered the Digital Humanities.  ELDj is intentionally taking a broad consideration for what is included in the digital humanities with the clear understanding that this issue, and the articles within, will contribute to this growing field and provide a groundwork for further reflection and research.

Timeline

Deadline for Submission: November 14, 2016

Notification of Acceptance: March 1st, 2017

Final Revised Submission: April 21, 2017

Publication: June 2, 2017

Publication and Presentation

The issue will be published prior to, and featured at, the 7th Annual Emerging Learning Design Conference (ELDc17) on June 2nd, 2017.

Based on when a submission is accepted, authors may be offered the opportunity to present their research at the 7th Annual Emerging Learning Design Conference in June, 2017.  Presentations must be given in an appropriate presentation format for the conference: panel (full conference audience), workshop (120 minutes), concurrent (45 minutes), or Sparks! (5 minutes to full conference audience).

Submission Details

Manuscripts should be the appropriate length for the material being presented.

  • Full paper manuscripts can vary from 2500-4500 words in addition to an abstract of 250 words and a works cited section of appropriate length.
  • Briefs or Trends papers have a limit of 1000 words.

A description of each type of submission and guidelines can be found at http://eldj.montclair.edu/submission-guidelines/  ELDj uses a double-blind, peer-review process. Submissions should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication elsewhere.   Authors should review the above linked guidelines for important and relevant information.

Submissions should be sent to eldj@mail.montclair.edu: questions and information requests may be sent to the Editors at the same address.

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more on digital humanities and publications for digital humanities in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+humanities

Augmented Reality For Special Needs Learning

Utilizing Augmented Reality For Special Needs Learning

Utilizing Augmented Reality For Special Needs Learning

Augmented reality is a variation of virtual environments, but has a few added advantages for special needs learning. With virtual environments the user is completely immersed in a virtual world and cannot see the real environment around him or her. This may cause some confusion for special needs learners and can hinder learning. In contrast, augmented reality allows the user to see the real world with virtual objects superimposed upon or composited with the real world. This provides the greatest benefit as learners remain part of the world around them and learn easily.

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more on the topic

Muñoz, Silvia Baldiris Navarro and Ramón, “Gremlings in My Mirror: An Inclusive AR-Enriched Videogame for Logical Math Skills Learning”, Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT) 2014 IEEE 14th International Conference on, pp. 576-578, 2014.

GLOBAL COLLABORATION DAY SEPTEMBER 15TH

Students, teachers, and organizations will join together online to celebrate and demonstrate global collaboration on September 15, 2016. On Global Collaboration Day, educators and professionals from around the world will host connective projects and events and invite public participation. This event is brought to you by VIF International Education, Google for Education, iEARN-USA and Edmodo.

The primary goals of this 24-hour, worldwide event are to:

  • demonstrate the power of global connectivity in classrooms, schools, institutions of informal learning and universities around the world
  • introduce others to the collaborative tools, resources and projects that are available to educators today
  • to focus attention on the need for developing globally competent students and teachers throughout the world

Global Collaboration Day will take place on September 15 in participant time zones. Classrooms, schools, and organizations will design and host engaging online activities for others to join. Events will range from mystery location calls to professional development events to interviews with experts. All events will be collated in an online calendar viewable in participants’ individual time zones. Participants will be connected on Twitter via the hashtag #globaled16.

An optional new activity this year will be the Great Global Project Challenge. Between now and October 1, 2016, global educators will design collaborative projects using a variety of platforms in which other students and teachers may participate during the course of the 2016-2017 school year. The objective is to create and present as many globally connective projects for students and educators as possible. The final deadline for submissions into our project directory is October 1, but participants are also encouraged to do an introductory activity for their project on Global Collaboration Day as well.

Global Collaboration Day is a project of the Global Education Conference Network, a free online virtual conference that takes place every November during International Education Week. GCD, along with Global Education Day at ISTE and Global Leadership Week, are events designed to connect educators and keep global conversations going year round.

For more information about Global Collaboration Day, please visit our main web site. A digital flyer is also available for distribution.

Follow us on social media:

 

Help us spread the word. Here are some sample Tweets:

  • Join us for Global Collaboration Day! Details here: http://bit.ly/2016GCD #globaled16
  • YOUR ORG’S TWITTER HANDLE is pleased to partner with @GlobalEdCon and educators around the globe for Global Collaboration Day: http://bit.ly/2016GCD
  • Are you an education leader? Inspire global collaboration on Global Collaboration Day 9/15. http://bit.ly/2016GCD #globaled16
  • Learn more about participating in the Global Collaboration Day celebration: http://bit.ly/2016GCD #globaled16
  • Project hosts are sought for Global Collaboration Day. Details here: http://bit.ly/2016GCD #globaled16

 

Logos and Badges for Participants, Hosts, Partners and Sponsors are located here: http://bit.ly/gcdimages

Interested in serving as an outreach partner?


Send an email to Lucy Gray (lucy@globaledevents.com) indicating your interest. Include information on how you can help us get the word out to networks with 5000 members or more.

SPED rules for virtual schools

Feds Say Virtual Schools Need to Follow Special Ed Rules

By Dian Schaffhauser 08/25/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/08/25/feds-say-virtual-schools-need-to-follow-special-ed-rules.aspx

Dear Colleague” letter issued to virtual schools by the U.S. Department of Education. The agency isn’t creating or imposing “new legal requirements,” is intended to help state education agencies and districts meet their existing obligations under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

feedback at virtualschools@ed.gov.

The letter is available on the Education Department website here.

over-achieving students ignored

Age-Based, Grade-Level System Ignores Huge Numbers of Over-Achieving Students

By Dian Schaffhauser 08/23/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/08/23/age-based-grade-level-system-ignores-huge-numbers-of-over-achieving-students.aspx

How Can So Many Students Be Invisible? Large Percentages of American Students Perform Above Grade Level,” produced in the Institute of Education Policy at Johns Hopkins University, examined data sets from five sources: the Common Core-based Smarter Balanced assessments in Wisconsin and California, Florida’s standards assessments, the Northwest Evaluation Association’s (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP).

between 15 percent and 45 percent of students enter elementary classrooms each fall learning above grade level. The result is that they’re not challenged enough in school, and teacher time and school resources are wasted in trying to teach them stuff they already know.

The entire report is available on the institute’s website. http://education.jhu.edu/edpolicy/commentary/PerformAboveGradeLevel

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more on gifted students in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gifted

Pokemon Go for or against it

New assignment this fall in Minnesota schools: deal with ‘Pokémon Go’

Education Solvejg Wastvedt · ·
https://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/08/26/pokemon-go-school-concerns
The company accepts requests for removals via its support website
1. School administrator John Wetter took on an odd assignment over summer break at the request of one of his principals: Track down any PokéStops or gyms lurking on Hopkins school grounds. He asked game developer Niantic Labs to remove it from the game.
So far the game has only been blocked at sites such as the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
2. Some educators are embracing the interest in “Pokémon Go” as a potential teaching tool. “Any time something becomes a big pop culture sensation, as a teacher I try to just kind of ride the coattails,”
At St. Paul’s Washington Technology Magnet School, educator Eric Gunderson made a spinoff of “Pokémon Go” that students can play on their district-issued iPads. He created it using an augmented reality app called Aurasma. He printed pictures of eggs on sheets of paper. Get the printed egg in view of the iPad’s camera, and an animated animal appears onscreen, a knockoff Pokémon.
The Minnesota Department of Education said it hasn’t gotten inquiries from school districts concerned about “Pokémon Go.” A spokesperson for the Osseo Area School District noted that students face many distractions. “Our leaders are very skilled in dealing with whatever the distraction of the day is,” the spokesperson wrote in an email.

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