Archive of ‘student-centered learning’ category

gen z coming to campus

Survey: What Gen Z Thinks About Ed Tech in College

A report on digital natives sheds light on their learning preferences.
Like the millennials before them, Generation Z grew up as digital natives, with devices a fixture in the learning experience. According to the survey results, these students want “engaging, interactive learning experiences” and want to be “empowered to make their own decisions.” In addition, the students “expect technology to play an instrumental role in their educational experience.”
to cater to the digital appetites of tomorrow’s higher education learners, technology in education will need to play a bit of catch-up, states the New Media Consortium’s 2015 Course Apps report. According to NMC’s analysts, digital-textbook adoption was one of the leading trends helping to reinvent how higher education students learn. But publishers have not captured the innovations happening elsewhere in the digital marketplace.

The Generation Z report ranked the effectiveness of 11 education technology tools:

  1. Smartboards
  2. Do-It-Yourself Learning
  3. Digital Textbooks
  4. Websites with Study Materials
  5. Online Videos
  6. Game-Based Learning Systems
  7. Textbook
  8. Social Media
  9. Skype
  10. Podcasts
  11. DVD/Movies
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more on Gen Z in this blog:

Generation Z bibliography

 

proctoring

Clemson University’s Centralized Proctoring Story

http://marketing.softwaresecure.com/acton/fs/blocks/showLandingPage/a/10395/p/p-002f/t/page/fm/0

e-Campus news offers a proctoring model: http://www.ecampusnews.com/whitepapers/5-step-guide-to-how-clemson-university-online-is-centralizing-online-proctoring/ conveniently presented in a 5-step outline, webinar and “case study” paper.

According to them, you just “Follow their story and learn how the team at Clemson Online implemented RPNow, and how they’re planning to centralize remote proctoring to increase student convenience, faculty efficiency and reduce the costs of exam administration.”

It is, of course, sponsored by the company, who will be paid for the proctoring
http://www.softwaresecure.com/product/remote-proctor-now/

Here are my issues with the proposal:

  1. step 5 of the five-step outline: “Take control of the payment model. Institutional payment (as opposed to student pay) creates a better experience for the student and cost savings for all.”
    so, if the institution pays, then student don’t pay? I find this and illusion, since the institution pays by using students’ tuition. which constantly grows. so, the statement is rather deceptive.
  2. As with the huge controversy around Turnitin (e.g., this 2009 article, and this 2012 article), “mechanizing” the very humane process evaluation is outright wrong. The attempt to compensate the lack of sufficient number of faculty by “outsourcing” to machines is en vogue with the nationwide strive of higher ed administration to create an “assembly line” type of education, which makes profit, but it is dubious if it teaches [well].
  3. Pedagogically (as per numerous discussions in the Chronicle of Higher Education and similar sources), if the teaching materials and exams are structured in an engaging way, students cheat much less. The “case study” paper claims reduction of cheating, but it is reduction based on fear to be caught, not based on genuine interest in learning.

 

Inquiry-Based Classroom

10 Tips For Launching An Inquiry-Based Classroom

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/09/21/10-tips-for-launching-an-inquiry-based-classroom/

1. Don’t teach the content standards; help kids find their own path towards the information they need to know.

2. Don’t tell students what they should know; create the structure for them to experience it on their own.

3. Use class time to make connections between pieces of information.

4. Many kids struggle with reading, so hook them with the non-written word.

5. Stop giving struggling kids the most boring version of the work to repeat over and over again.

6. Surprise students.

7. The traditional model of imparting knowledge isn’t working very well, so don’t be afraid to try out inquiry.

8. Find the “bend” in the outcomes and abandon the prescriptive path.

9. Indulge interesting student questions even if it doesn’t fit the pacing guide.

10. Approach the practice of teaching with inquiry and use that meta-practice to improve.

fit game education

The Fit Children of Seinäjoen

http://www.spiegel.de/international/tomorrow/nutrition-how-finland-has-solved-the-problem-of-obese-children-a-1088256.html

My note: the Spiegel article is about obesity and fitness, but I see if very congruent with gamification

But what are the Finns doing right? The answer is multifaceted and likely has something to do with the Finnish mentality, which tends to take an uncomplicated, pragmatic approach to problems.

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More on the Finland phenomenon in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=finland+phenomenon

timeline tools for history and education

Technology tools for history lessons

HSTRY Timeline Creator.
HSTRY is a multimedia timeline creation tool that will work on your laptop, Chromebook, iPad, or tablet. With a HSTRY account you can build timelines in a vertical scroll format similar to that of a Facebook feed. To start the process pick a topic and upload a cover photo. To add events to the timeline just click the “+” symbol and select the type of media that you want to add to your timeline. You can add videos, images, audio, and text to the events on your timeline.
There are two features of HSTRY that make it stand-out from the crowd. First, as a teacher you can create an online classroom in which you can view all of your students’ timelines. Second, as a teacher you can build questions into timelines that you share with your students. You can even build-in explanations of the answers to your questions.
For other timeline creation tools, check out this chart.

My note: HSTRY could be a great tool, if the organizers were not that greedy. Their plan + kicks in way to early and does not allow participants to collaborate. E.g., Zaption allows teachers / students to “share” their presentations, but HSTRY asks right away to upgrade. Thumb down!

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5 Timeline Creation Tools Compared – Chart

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2014/12/5-timeline-creation-tools-compared-chart.html

Free Online Tools for Creating Timelines – Richard Byrne – FreeTech4Teachers.com

  Multimedia options Collaboration options Registration required iPad/ tablet compatibility Output/ publishing
Timeline JS

timeline.knightlab.com

Text Images Videos Yes, if you collaborate through Google Spreadsheets*** Google Account required. Display: yes Creation: no Embed code for posting  on blog / website.
RWT Timeline

bitly.com/1ym46nY

Text Images No. No. iPad app bitly.com/1vMTI7C Android app bitly.com/1vOcZEB Web app bitly.com/1ym46nY PDF.

Image saved on camera roll.

TimeGlider*

timeglider.com

Text Images Yes. Yes. Display: yes Creation: yes Embed code for posting on blog / website. Direct link to TG page.
Dipity**

dipity.com

Text Images Videos Yes. Yes. Display: yes Creation: no Embed code for posting on blog / website.
MyHistro

myhistro.com

Text Images Videos No. Yes. Display: yes Creation: iOS PDF.

Embed code.

*TimeGlider’s basic plan is free for students. A paid subscription is required to activate collaboration tools.

**Dipity’s basic plan is free for students. The basic account is limited to three timelines.

***Timeline JS utilizes Google Spreadsheets as the basis of timeline event creation. Students collaborate on a spreadsheet to build timelines. A video of the process is available at http://bitly.com/1zRLdr5

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More on the use of technology in history in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=history

Textbooks on Pay-as-You-Go Basis

New Model Lets Students Rent Textbooks on Pay-as-You-Go Basis

By Michael Hart 04/12/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/04/12/new-model-lets-students-rent-textbooks-on-pay-as-you-go-basis.aspx

Once students register with iFlipd, they can rent digital textbooks for as little as a week. Once they finish using a book, they can move it back into the digital catalogue, making it available to other students. There is a loyalty program that gives points toward free rentals.

iFlipd is also integrated with Datalogics and its interactive Active Textbook e-book system so that students have sharing capabilities. They can share notes on the texts through the platform and access notes made by previous users of the same textbooks. The note-sharing platform allows for highlighting, annotations, audio, video and search.

students and technology

2015 Student and Faculty Technology Research Studies

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2015/8/2015-student-and-faculty-technology-research-studies

Report: https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2015/8/ers1510ss.pdf?la=en

Infographic: ECAR_2015

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Study of Students and Information Technology, 2014

https://library.educause.edu/resources/2014/10/2014-student-and-faculty-technology-research-studies

report: https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2014/10/ers1406.pdf

Infographic: ECAR_2014

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Higher Ed: EDUCAUSE Releases ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology 2013

http://www.infodocket.com/2013/09/16/higher-ed-educause-releases-ecar-study-of-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013/

Direct to Full Text Report (49 pages; PDF)

students and technology 2013

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ECAR 2011

students and technology 2011

Detachable Devices

Report: Detachable Devices To Drive Tablet Growth Through 2020

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/03/10/report-detachable-devices-to-drive-tablet-growth-through-2020.aspx

By Joshua Bolkan,  03/10/16

Detachable tablets will nearly quadruple, as a share of the tablet market, from 8 percent to 30 percent in 2020, according to a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC).

Android detachables will account for 18.2 percent of the devices sold this year, according to IDC’s prediction, improving to 23.1 percent in 2020.

iOS market share among detachables will fall from 28.5 percent this year to 22.4 percent in 2020.

wearables

Report: Wearables To Top 10 Million Shipments in 2016

By Joshua Bolkan 03/21/16

Global sales of wearable devices will exceed 10 million this year, up 32.8 percent over 2015, according to a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC). That total will more than double by the end of the forecast period, 2020, to hit 237.1 million shipments if the company’s prediction holds true.

“Watch and wristband shipments will reach a combined total of 100 million shipments in 2016, up from 72.2 million in 2015,” according to a news release. “Other form factors, such as clothing, eyewear, and hearables, are expected to reach 9.8 million units in 2016 and will more than double their share by 2020. This will open the door for new experiences, use cases, and applications going forward.

basic academic research

Opinion: How basic academic research leads to innovation

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