Archive of ‘student-centered learning’ category

zaption is zapped

Zap! Zaption Sold to Workday

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2016-06-30-zap-zaption-sold-to-workday

K12 – Nearpod or EdPuzzle.

Higher Ed: HapYak or H5P

http://blog.zaption.com/post/146724427719/zaption-joins-workday

http://www.zaption.com/faq

Are there any other platforms like Zaption that you recommend?

For K12 users, we recommend you look at EDpuzzle or Nearpod. Both allow you to quickly create high-quality interactive content. For Higher Ed, we encourage you to look at HapYak or H5P – an open source interactive media platform. Finally, Vizia offers another simple but effective option for users of any kind.

Zaption is shutting down. Thankfully, educators have alternatives

For those looking to replace Zaption, Vizia is a viable alternative for creating interactive video content.

Zaption is shutting down. Thankfully, educators have alternatives

Vizia

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More on Zaption in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=zaption

more on badges

Badging: Not Quite the Next Big Thing

While badging and digital credentialing are gaining acceptance in the business world and, to some extent, higher education, K-12 educators — and even students — are slower to see the value.

By Michael Hart 07/20/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/07/20/badging-not-quite-the-next-big-thing.aspx

That’s when the MacArthur Foundation highlighted the winning projects of its Badges for Lifelong Learning competition at the Digital Media and Learning Conference in Chicago. The competition, co-sponsored by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Mozilla Foundation, had attracted nearly 100 competitors a year earlier. The winners shared $2 million worth of development grants.

Evidence of Lifelong Learning

A digital badge or credential is a validation, via technology, that a person has earned an accomplishment, learned a skill or gained command of specific content. Typically, it is an interactive image posted on a web page and connected to a certain body of information that communicates the badge earner’s competency.

Credly is a company that offers off-the-shelf credentialing and badging for organizations, companies and educational institutions. One of its projects, BadgeStack, which has since been renamed BadgeOS, was a winner in the 2013 MacArthur competition. Virtually any individual or organization can use its platform to determine criteria for digital credentials and then award them, often taking advantage of an open-source tool like WordPress. The credential recipient can then use the BadgeOS platform to manage the use of the credential, choosing to display badges on social media profiles or uploading achievements to a digital resume, for instance.

Finkelstein and others see, with the persistently growing interest in competency-based education (CBE), that badging is a way to assess and document competency.

Colorado Education Initiative, (see webinar report in this IMS blog http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/20/colorados-digital-badging-initiative/)

There are obstacles, though, to universal acceptance of digital credentialing.
For one, not every community, company or organization sees a badge as something of value.

When a player earns points for his or her success in a game, those points have no value outside of the environment in which the game is played. For points, badges, credentials — however you want to define them — to be perceived as evidence of competency, they have to have portability and be viewed with value outside of their own environment.

 

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More on badges in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=badges

virtual reality games and learning

Research Suggests Students Learn More When Collaborating in Virtual Reality Games

By Michael Hart

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/06/22/research-suggests-students-learn-more-when-working-together-in-virtual-reality-games.aspx

In the research project led by Ph.D. candidate Gabriel Culbertson, 48 students were recruited to play two versions of the game. In one group, students were connected via a chat interface with another player who could, if they wanted, offer advice on how to play. The second group played a version of the game in which they were definitely required to collaborate on quests.

The research group found the students in the second so-called “high-interdependence” group spent more time communicating and, as a consequence, learned more words.

The research then expanded to a larger group of 186 Reddit users who were learning Japanese. After reviewing gameplay logs, interviews and Reddit posts, they found that those who spent the most time engaged in the game learned more new words and phrases.

The Cornell research team presented its research results at the Association for Computing Machinery Conference on Human-Computer Interaction in May in San Jose, CA.

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more on games in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=games

more on virtual reality in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=virtual+reality

google cast

Google Cast for Education Allows Students, Teachers to Share the Projector

By David Nagel

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/06/27/google-cast-for-education-allows-students-teachers-to-share-the-projector.aspx

Cast for Education is an app that works on Chrome OS, macOS and Windows. The app is launching in a public beta today and is available as a free download. The difference between Cast and other screen sharing solutions is network-independence.

Google today also launched the full version of its educational virtual reality tool Google Expeditions, along with a new Quiz feature for Google Apps for Education.

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more on screen-sharing opportunities in education:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=doceri

Google Mapping Your Campus

Google Mapping Your Campus: A Real-World Writing Project Integrating Mobile Technology and Team-Based Learning

A Real-World Writing Project Integrating Mobile Technology and Team-Based Learning

http://douko.weebly.com/google-mapping-my-campus.html

More on Google Maps in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=google+maps

BYOD in the library

I recent post from LITA listserv is seeking an input on libraries maintaining BYOD-friendly in some corner in the building:

From: Eng-Ziskin, Susanna M
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2016 4:05 PM
To: ‘lita-l@lists.ala.org’ <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Tablet technology & instruction survey

Does your library have an iPad/tablet cart, or a dedicated classroom with mobile devices? Have you been teaching library research sessions using iPads or tablets? We invite you to participate in a study that aims to take a look at how tablets are used in library instruction, and the experiences of those who administer and maintain them.  We’re hoping to learn about the experiences of others who also use mobile devices for instruction, as our own have been mixed.

The survey will take approximately 15-20 minutes to complete and can be accessed using the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/VGWWM55.

Participation is voluntary and this survey is anonymous. Participants must be at least 18 years of age. If you complete the survey your consent to participate will be assumed. The survey will be available until 7/1/2016.

We thank you for your time and consideration!

Susanna Eng-Ziskin and Jamie Johnson

Susanna Eng-Ziskin
Acting Chair,  Reference, Instruction & Outreach Services Department—California State University, Northridge Oviatt Libraryc 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-8370, Phone: 818-677-4679, http://library.csun.edu, susanna.eng@csun.edu

Last year, MC 218 was supposed to be remodeled. My suggestion to bring MC 218 to the modern standards of a library, as per LITA’s survey, was completely ignored as reported to SCSU library director:

MC218 remodel

cultural differences

Chinese, Americans Truly See Differently, Study Says

John Roach for National Geographic NewsAugust 22, 2005

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/08/0822_050822_chinese.html

Richard Nisbett, a psychologist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Westerners and Easterners see the world differently

http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7882

peer review in class

Frame Your Feedback: Making Peer Review Work in Class

By:

June 6th, 2016

Frame Your Feedback: Making Peer Review Work in Class

Instruct students to include a brief memo of guidance with the work they would like others to review. The memo includes two components: a context paragraph and a list of questions.

Recommendations for Revitalizing the Student Peer Review Process

  1. Have a candid discussion about students’ experiences with peer review.
  2. Emphasize the broad range of peer review.
  3. Make students accountable for accurate, useful feedback.
  4. Model these practices in your feedback to students.
  5. Require students to write memos when they ask for your feedback.
  6. Every professional needs feedback to succeed in their work. These skills can set the foundation for how to ask for, receive, and provide useful feedback.

References

Simmons, J. (May 2003). Responders are taught, not born. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy 46(8), 684–693.

VanDeWeghe, R. (September 2004). “Awesome, dude!”: Responding helpfully to peer writing. English Journal 94(1), 95–99.

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