Posts Tagged ‘Thinglink’

app smashing

My note:
#appsmashing must be the evolution of the ~ 2010 #mashup

appsmashing

from: http://www.zigzagstech.com/app-smashing

http://k12technology.weebly.com/app-smashing.html

App Smashing is the process of using multiple apps to create projects or complete tasks. App Smashing can provide your students with creative and inspired ways to showcase their learning and allow you to assess their understanding and skills.

6 Amazing App Smash Examples to Inspire Creativity

http://edtechteacher.org/unleashing-creativity-greg-kulowiec-app-smashing-from-beth-holland/

https://padlet.com/lmoore4/72nzkwdipo5y

Why App Smash?

What is an App Smash?

Content created in one app transferred to and enhanced by a second app and sometimes third. Preferably the final product is then published to the web – remember, digital presence is the new résumé (CV).

Reasons to App Smash:

  1. It demands creative thinking
  2. It demands more from the technology (value for money)
  3. It turns the issue of not having a ‘wonder app’ into a positive
  4. It removes any restrictions to take a topic as far as it can be taken.
  5. It often results in more engaging learning products
  6. It’s a fun challenge for ‘digital natives’

Key rules for successful App Smashing:

  1. Use the Camera Roll as your main conduit between apps
  2. Leave the app choice to the students
  3. Have a list of apps capable of smashing content together (See below)

19 Apps to Bring App Smashing to Your Classroom

 

TELLAGAMI, 

GREEN SCREEN DOINK 

YAKIT KIDS AND CHATTERPIX

EDUCREATIONS AND DOCERI 

BOOK CREATOR 

GOOGLE DOCS, SLIDES 

STRIP CREATOR 

SCOODLEJAM 

HELLO CRAYON 

GOOGLE DRAWING 

TOONTASTIC

PUBLISHING

thinglink, youtube, padlet, seesaw, realtimes,

VR trends

6 VR Trends to Watch in Education

By Sri Ravipati  05/16/17

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/05/16/6-vr-trends-to-watch-in-education.aspx

VR devices are expected to increase 85 percent by 2020, with gaming and educational applications driving most of that growth.

Maya Georgieva, an ed tech strategist, author and speaker with more than 15 years of experience in higher education and global education. Georgieva is co-founder of Digital Bodies, a consulting group that provides news and analysis of VR, AR and wearables in education

Emory Craig,  currently the director of e-learning at the College of New Rochelle,

six areas with promising developments for educators.

1) More Affordable Headsets

the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive, which I really like, you’re talking close to $2,000 per setup. the 2017 SXSWedu conference,

Microsoft has been collaborating with its partners, such as HP, Acer, Dell and Lenovo, to develop VR headsets that will work with lower-end desktops. Later this year, the companies will debut headsets for $299, “which is much more affordable compared to HoloLens

many Kickstarter crowdfunding efforts are bound to make high-end headsets more accessible for teaching.

the NOLO project. The NOLO system is meant for mobile VR headsets and gives users that “6 degrees of freedom” (or 6 DoF) motion tracking that is currently only found in high-end headsets.

2) Hand Controllers That Will Bring Increased Interactivity

Google Daydream  Samsung has also implemented its own hand controller for Gear VR

Microsoft  new motion controllers at Microsoft Build

zSpace, with their stylus and AR glasses, continue to develop their immersive applications

3) Easy-to-Use Content Creation Platforms

Game engines like Unity and Unreal are often a starting point for creating simulations.

Labster, which creates virtual chemistry labs — will become important in specialized subjects

ThingLink, for example, recently introduced a school-specific editor for creating 360-degree and VR content. Lifeliqe, Aurasma and Adobe are also working on more interactive tools.

5) 360-Degree Cameras

6) Social VR Spaces

AltspaceVR h uses avatars and supports multiplayer sessions that allow for socialization and user interaction.

Facebook has been continuing to develop its own VR platform, Facebook Spaces, which is in beta and will be out later this year. LectureVR is a similar platform on the horizon.

 

+++++++++++++++
more on augmented reality in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=augmented

Powtoon as PPT alternative

Shortened URL: http://scsu.mn/1kLcn1o

Original URL: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/11/11/powtoon-as-ppt-alternative/

PowToon

what is Powtoon. http://www.powtoon.com/?edgetrackerid=1407528290497

PowToon is Web-based animation software that allows users to create animated presentations by manipulating pre-created objects, imported images, provided music and user created voice-overs.[4] Powtoon uses an Adobe Flex engine to generate an XML file that can be played in the Powtoon online viewer, exported to YouTube or downloaded as an MP4 file.[2]

  1. Videomaker, Presentation tool, storytelling tool.
  2. templates versus starting from scratch
  3. having a plan (or a story, or a screenplay)
  4. narrate with voice over your video. can’t edit recording, but can re-record

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PowToon

Why Powtoon.

Powtoon, like
Prezi (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=as9po3WbOhI&list=PL09A34EF19596B7BB),
ThingLink (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRkdIdbqHig)
Haiku Deck (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5crVTsJk9QE)
is one of the many cloud-based applications, which effectively can substitute PowerPoint. Here is an entry from this same blog, which list a generous choice of similar applications:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/08/27/presentation-tools-for-teaching/

Before you start working on PowToon, please consider the following guidelines for a good presentation design:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/10/13/presentation-design/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/09/19/presentation-design-rules/

Here are some tutorials, which you might consider:

How to use PowToon

Powtoon Tutorial – Creating Your First Powtoon

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/

2014 Best Educational Web Sites

Best Websites for Teaching & Learning 2014

http://www.ala.org/aasl/standards-guidelines/best-websites/2014

Media sharing

Digital Storytelling

Manage and organize

Social Networking and Communication

Content Resources

Curriculum Collaboration

 

BYOD toolchest: 51 teaching and learning tools for mobile devices

The Epic BYOD Toolchest (51 Tools You Can Use Now)

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/the-epic-byod-toolchest-vicki-davis

Formative Assessment

Screencasting and Capturing What Happens in Class

Content-Sharing Platforms

  • Sophia: Nudged along by my friend Todd Nesloney, I use Sophia for my computer applications instruction and am very pleased with the results.
  • Haiku Learning: This is the full content management system that I’m trying to get our school to adopt. It’s multiplatform and robust, which makes it a great fit for our BYOD environment.

There are many other apps like MoodleCanvas, and Coursesites. The point is that you should have one in a BYOD environment.

Assessment Aids

All three of these apps — Quick KeyGrade Ninja, and WISE — are available on iTunes and Google Play, but there are more.

Electronic Note Taking

Expression

Students need multiple ways to share and express themselves, particularly verbally and with pictures. This is part of transliteracy.

Cloud Syncing

Graphic Design and Infographics

Color Selection

Presentations

Blogging

Written Expression

Link Sharing

More  (from the blog section)

If you’re working with multiple apps like Google Drive, Dropbox, One Drive, Evernote and need to search across them in one shot, take a look at Xendo (http://xen.do) – gives you a personal, private Google-like search across all your apps.

8 Interactive Video Tools for Engaging Learners

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/film-festival-interactive-video-tools-resources