Searching for "data library"

library and millennials

this article was published in 2006

Mcdonald, R., & Thomas, C. (2006). Disconnects Between Library Culture and Millennial Generation Values. Retrieved from http://er.educause.edu/articles/2006/1/disconnects-between-library-culture-and-millennial-generation-values
disconnects into three categories—technology, policy, and unexploited opportunities—and discuss ways academic libraries can create next-generation landscapes to address these gaps.
Most library information systems and discovery tools are not easy to customize and remain substantially limited by an enduring library obsession with individual privacy and copyright.

Technology Disconnects

Some of the key technology disconnects between libraries and current online communities include:

  • Libraries lack tools to support the creation of new-model digital scholarship and to enable the use of Web services frameworks to support information reformatting (for example, RSS) and point-of-need Web-based assistance (multimedia tutorials or instant messaging assistance).
  • Dogmatic library protection of privacy inhibits library support for file-sharing, work-sharing, and online trust-based transactions that are increasingly common in online environments, thus limiting seamless integration of Web-based services.
  • Ubiquitous handheld access is more prominent thanks to digital lifestyle devices such as smart phones and iPods, yet libraries still focus on digital content for typical desktop PCs.

Policy Disconnects

Drawing a clear line between technology and policy can be difficult. For example, how many of the characteristics of current libraries (identified by the list below) are driven purely by technology or by policy? These traits include:

  • Mainly electronic text-based collections with multimedia content noticeably absent
  • Constructed for individual use but requires users to learn from experts how to access and use information and services
  • Library presence usually “outside” the main online place for student activity (MySpace, iTunes, Facebook, the campus portal, or learning management system)

Similarly, a policy solution might be required to address the following types of disconnects between libraries and online users:

  • Deliberately pushing library search tools into other environments such as learning management systems or social network infrastructure and, conversely, integrating popular external search tools into library frameworks (such as Google Scholar and MS Academic Live Search or LibX.org)
  • Libraries linking and pointing to larger sets of open-access data that add context to their local collections
  • Restructuring access to reflect use instead of library organizational structure

Opportunity Disconnects

What is your library doing to:

  • Support the user’s affinity for self-paced, independent, trial-and-error methods of learning?
  • Create opportunities to make library information look and behave like information that exists in online entertainment venues?
  • Explore alternative options for delivering information literacy skills to users in online environments and alternate spaces?
  • Apply the typical user’s desire for instant gratification to the ways that libraries could be using technology for streamlined services?
  • Redefine administrative, security, and policy restrictions to permit online users an online library experience that rivals that of a library site visit?
  • Preserve born-digital information?

The promise of seamlessness that stems from ubiquitous computing access and instantly available networked information is, unfortunately, stifled significantly within the libraries of today.

++++++++++

more on millennials in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=millennial

Text and Data Mining

Webinar: Text and Data Mining: The Way Forward, June 30, 10am (EDT)

LITA announcement. Date: Thursday, June 30, 2016,  Time:  10am-11:30am (EDT), Platform: WebEx. Registration required.

a critically important means of uncovering patterns of intellectual practice and usage that have the potential for illuminating facets and perspectives in research and scholarship that might otherwise not be noted. At the same time, challenges exist in terms of project management and support, licensing and other necessary protections.

Confirmed speakers include: Audrey McCulloch, Executive Director, ALPSP; Michael Levine-Clark, Dean of Libraries, University of Denver; Ellen Finnie, Head, Scholarly Communications and Collections Strategies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Jeremy Frey, Professor of Physical Chemistry, Head of Computational Systems Chemistry, University of Southampton, UK.

Audrey McCulloch, Chief Executive, Association of Learned Professional and Society Publishers (ALPSP) and Director of the Publishers Licensing Society

Text and Data Mining: Library Opportunities and Challenges
Michael Levine-Clark, Dean and Director of Libraries, University of Denver

As scholars engage with text and data mining (TDM), libraries have struggled to provide support for projects that are unpredictable and tremendously varied. While TDM can be considered a fair use, in many cases contracts need to be renegotiated and special data sets created by the vendor. The unique nature of TDM projects makes it difficult to plan for them, and often the library and scholar have to figure them out as they go along. This session will explore strategies for libraries to effectively manage TDM, often in partnership with other units on campus and will offer suggestions to improve the process for all.

Michael Levine-Clark, the Dean and Director of the University of Denver Libraries, is the recipient of the 2015 HARRASOWITZ Leadership in Library Acquisitions Award. He writes and speaks regularly on strategies for improving academic library collection development practices, including the use of e-books in academic libraries, the development of demand-driven acquisition models, and implications of discovery tool implementation.

Library licensing approaches in text and data mining access for researchers at MIT
Ellen Finnie, Head, Scholarly Communications & Collections Strategy, MIT Libraries

This talk will address the challenges and successes that the MIT libraries have experienced in providing enabling services that deliver TDM access to MIT researchers, including:
· emphasizing TDM in negotiating contracts for scholarly resources

· defining requirements for licenses for TDM access

· working with information providers to negotiate licenses that work for our researchers

· addressing challenges and retooling to address barriers to success

· offering educational guides and workshops

· managing current needs v. the long-term goal– TDM as a reader’s right

Ellen Finnie is Head, Scholarly Communications & Collections Strategy in the MIT Libraries. She leads the MIT Libraries’ scholarly communications and collections strategy in support of the Libraries’ and MIT’s objectives, including in particular efforts to influence models of scholarly publishing and communication in ways that increase the impact and reach of MIT’s research and scholarship and which promote open, sustainable publishing and access models. She leads outreach efforts to faculty in support of scholarly publication reform and open access activities at MIT, and acts as the Libraries’ chief resource for copyright issues and for content licensing policy and negotiations. In that role, she is involved in negotiating licenses to include text/data mining rights and coordinating researcher access to TDM services for licensed scholarly resources. She has written and spoken widely on digital acquisitions, repositories, licensing, and open access.

Jeremy Frey, Professor of Physical Chemistry, Head of Computational Systems Chemistry, University of Southampton, UK

Text and Data Mining (TDM) facilitates the discovery, selection, structuring, and analysis of large numbers of documents/sets of data, enabling the visualization of results in new ways to support innovation and the development of new knowledge. In both academia and commercial contexts, TDM is increasingly recognized as a means to extract, re-use and leverage additional value from published information, by linking concepts, addressing specific questions, and creating efficiencies. But TDM in practice is not straightforward. TDM methodology and use are fast changing but are not yet matched by the development of enabling policies.

This webinar provides a review of where we are today with TDM, as seen from the perspective of the researcher, library, and licensing-publisher communities. 

assessment library

NISO Virtual Conference:

Justifying the Library: Using Assessment to Justify Library Investments

April 20, 11:00am – 5:00pm EST – Learn more and register at: http://www.niso.org/news/events/2016/virtual_conference/apr20_virtualconf/

Assessment exercises for institutional libraries are frequently a double-edged sword; they’re as readily used to justify cuts as they are to bolster budgets. This NISO virtual conference provides expert insights into how data gathered in the normal course of activities can be leveraged to demonstrate value to the parent institution. Data represent the raw material for building your case. What data are available? How is their quality? What is the appropriate context for persuasively presenting that data to deans, provosts and other administrators? This virtual conference will address the very hot topic of library assessment in the context of a changing educational environment and features a complete roster of expert speakers, including:

  • Steven J. Bell, Associate University Librarian, Temple University
  • Nancy Turner, Assessment and Organizational Performance Librarian, Temple University
  • Jocelyn Wilk, University Archivist, Columbia University
  •    Elisabeth Brown, Director of Assessment & Scholarly Communications Librarian, SUNY-Binghamton
  • Ken Varnum, Senior Program Manager for Discovery, Delivery, & Learning Analytics, University of Michigan
  • Jan Fransen, Service Lead for Researcher and Discovery Systems, University of Minnesota
  •    Kristi Holmes, Directer, Galter Health Sciences Library, Northwestern University
  •    Starr Hoffman, Head, Planning & Assessment, University of Nevada – Las Vegas
  • Carl Grant, Chief Technology Officer and Associate University Librarian for Knowledge Services, University of Oklahoma

The preliminary agenda and pricing information for this event may be found at:

http://www.niso.org/news/events/2016/virtual_conference/apr20_virtualconf/

As a bonus, register for the virtual conference and receive an automatic registration for the follow-up training webinar, Making Assessment Work: Using ORCIDS to Improve Your Institutional Assessments, on Thursday, April 28!

http://www.niso.org/news/events/2016/training_thursday/apr28_tt/

Instructors for that session are Alice Meadows (ORCID), Christopher Erdmann (Harvard University) and Merle Rosenzweig (University of Michigan).

For more information about this event, please contact Jill O’Neill (joneill@niso.org).

Other questions for NISO? Get in touch at:

NISO

3600 Clipper Mill Road

Suite 302

Baltimore, MD 21211-1948

Phone: +1.301.654.2512

Email: nisohq@niso.org

More on assessment in this IMS blog:

analytics in education

Technology Training for Library Staff

Please join us for this free webinar and learn fun and effective ways to develop technology skills amongst library staff:

Technology Training for Library Staff: Effective and Engaging Training Programs
Wednesday, January 27, 11:00am-12:00pm PST

Registration Link: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/lpbeog1w500a&eom

 

PPT Tech Skills Library Staff

How can we get library staff excited about learning new technology skills? How can libraries be better prepared to help the public with technology questions? How can staff go from tech shy to tech savvy? Designing an engaging technology training program can help all library staff get up to speed.

Join us for this free webinar to learn about two fun and engaging staff technology training programs in public libraries. Our guest panelists will share details of their programs, including success stories and lessons learned.

  • The Estes Valley Library dedicated six months to bringing every staff member up to technical literacy through trainings that were hands-on and fun. Tech Guide Diana Laughlin will share their Technology Competencies, the process they created for staff learning, and the way they approached staff accountability.
  • The Sunnyvale Public Library designed the True Tech Ninja program. Adult Services Librarian Rachel Schmidt will share how they created a gamified program to teach technology skills through seven stages. Team work was encouraged and rewarded, and library administration played a key role in motivating staff to learn.

This webinar will be recorded and archived on the TechSoup for Libraries website. Please register for this webinar to receive an email notification when the archive is available. Email questions to cschimpf@techsoupglobal.org

Register for this webinar here: https://cc.readytalk.com/r/lpbeog1w500a&eom

Crystal Schimpf

Webinar Producer, TechSoup for Libraries

 

my notes:

1PM, Wed, Jan 27. #ts4libs

librarians excited about tech stuff
Diana Laughlin

she from a small public library in a small (5K) town in Colorado.

tech scavenger hunt: complete tech tasks all around the lib; once a year.

The Invisible Digital Divide In Libraries

by https://twitter.com/sallyheroes

tech ninja training. 7 ninja skills. your first mission is to master the library web page. complete these three tasks.

(my note: using gaming and gamification techniques). and this is how this library improved their web site – through gamification and including ALL parties, whereas this SCSU library has a web committee, where a regular LRS employee (heaven forbid a regular student) to gain participation on its web page is very much the same as to gain access to the federal reserve.

@TechSoup4Libs
“Would you like fries like that?” aka the art of up-selling: Tell patrons about services they might not already know about! . like for example the digital literacy instruction and other technology technology sessions, which some of the LRS faculty offer, but for some reason, they fail to be promoted by the LRS librarians.

Technology Skills for Library Staff: Effective and Engaging Training Programs

Dear Plamen Miltenoff,

Thank you for attending our webinar! You can view the archive materials for this webinar by clicking the links on the right. Additional resources can be viewed at the links below. Be sure to sign up to receive the TechSoup for Libraries Newsletter.

Upcoming TechSoup Webinars:

Presenter Resources:

TechSoup Product Donations:

TechSoup Blog Posts:

TechSoup:

 

the evolution of the library

For Internet To Go, Check The Library

http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2016/01/03/460962121/for-internet-to-go-check-the-library

But Urban argues it’s a good fit for the evolution of the library, while maintaining its purpose: to connect people to knowledge.
An evolution, which remains unnoticed by other libraries, including university ones. 

Get off the train in Florence Italy and you’re in a city-wide free wi-fi hotspot with better bandwidth access and speed than most home modems in the USA. There’s no reason that wi-fi access shouldn’t be provided as a benefit of being a citizen of the wealthiest (yet still incredibly backwards) nation on Earth.

big data and LRS door counters

LITA discussion (attached below) on how one can easily do real-time but also big-data like estimate of patrons’ attendance in the library.

GitHub https://github.com/ and listuser@chillco.com Cary, for wifi connected counter

From: Cary Gordon [mailto:listuser@chillco.com]
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2015 9:35 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: patron/door counter

I am not an expert on door counters, but I think that it would be pretty simple — no, really — to make your own system using a small, inexpensive computer like a Raspberry Pi with a wifi adapter and connect it to your current counter. It would take a little programming, but the result could be something that the community could share.

If you are interested in this, we could create a project on GitHub. I would be happy to help.

Cary

On Mar 28, 2015, at 2:49 PM, Mason Yang <hyang@marymount.edu> wrote:

Hi,

We have a old door counter which can only be checked manually. We are looking for a new door counter system which can help us to find out how many patrons come in during certain hours. I found a couple systems online and would like know if some libraries recently installed any door counter systems and what’s your experience with them. I made a short list of questions below. If you can take a few minutes to answer those questions or just drop a line or two of your comments to reply to this email, I will really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance for your time and inputs!

  1. what’s the model and the brand of the door counter system?
  1. Wired to your network or wireless connected to the internet?
  1. Does the system count the number of entries/exists hourly?
  1. Dose the system generate reports,if any, automatically?
  1. What’s your general experience of the system?
  1. Will you recommend the system to other libraries?

 

Thanks,

Mason Yang

Electronic Services Librarian

Library & Learning Services

Marymount University

 

Phone: 703-526-6844

Fax: 703-284-1685

mason.yang@marymount.edu

Infographics Workshops: Interpret and Present Data

How do you present the idea of your research and intertwine it with data in a cohesive, interesting way? Join us in a short session to learn effective communication through infographics using data visualization and design.

Location: Miller Center 205

Wednesday, February 18 2-2:45pm
Thursday, March 19 11-11:45am
Tuesday, April 14, 10-10:45am
Thursday, April 30, 10-10:45am

Register or see more information here:
http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/general/ims/default.asp

Games in the library

Games in the library

bibliography and research

http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/index.html

Playing in the Past: A History of Games, Toys, and Puzzles in North American Libraries
Author(s): Scott Nicholson
Source: The Library Quarterly, Vol. 83, No. 4 (October 2013), pp. 341-361
Published by: The University of Chicago Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/671913

demonstrate the different ways in which libraries have used games, toys, and puzzles over the last 150 years through bothcollections and services
p, 342 Defining games –
p. 348 Games as the Subject of Collections\
p. 350A significant shift in academic libraries is a focus on providing services to students. Since agrowing number of academic publications both current issues and back volumes

are ac-cessible online through library subscriptions, the physical space of academic libraries is notneeded for collections of periodicals. The concept of the “learning commons”has become
popular on US campuses in the past decade; it combines traditional library resources and
the availability of library staff members with group work spaces, computer access and assis-
tance, and writing assistance to provide one place where students can get assistance with
course work. In addition, many of these learning commons also include cafes, social spaces,
and other support of the social lives of students, and it is in this role that academic libraries
provide access to collections of games.

p. 357 Another upcoming area of gaming in libraries is gamification. Gamification is the application of game design elements to a nongame setting ðDeterding et al. 2011Þ.

————————————-

Nicholson, S. (2013, June). Exploring Gamification Techniques for Classroom Management. Paper Presented at Games+Learning+Society 9.0, Madison, WI

The concept of meaningful gamification is that the primary use of game layers is not to provide
external rewards, but rather to help participants find a deeper connection to the underyling topic

——————————-

 

More on games in education in this blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=games

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gamification

free “big data” sources

The Free ‘Big Data’ Sources Everyone Should Know

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141210080103-64875646-the-free-big-data-sources-everyone-should-know

Data.gov, click here.
US Census Bureau click here.
European Union Open Data Portal, click here.
Data.gov.uk, click here.
The CIA World Factbook, click here.
Healthdata.gov, click here.
NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre, click here.
Amazon Web Services public datasets, click here.
Facebook Graph, click here.
Gapminder, click here.
Google Trends, click here.
Google Finance, click here.
Google Books Ngrams, click here.
National Climatic Data Center, click here.
DBPedia, click here.
Topsy, click here.
Likebutton, click here.
New York Times, click here.
Freebase, click here.
Million Song Data Set, click here.

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