Searching for "mobile phones"

history mobile phones

Before there were cell phones, there were car phones.

Posted by Tech Insider on Friday, August 17, 2018

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more on mobile phones in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+phones

Millennials and Mobile Phones

Millennials Spend More Than 3 Hours a Day on Mobile Phones

https://thejournal.com/articles/2015/12/01/study-millennials-spend-more-than-3-hours-a-day-on-mobile-phones.aspx

The study also looked at U.S. millennials’ consumption of various media and technologies, finding that 76 percent watch online video on a daily basis; 71 percent use social media; and 55 percent use instant messaging. They spend nearly 3 hours a day watching on-demand video and TV shows on the Internet.

smartphones for learning and policies

6 ways to use students’ smartphones for learning

By Kelsey Ehnle 12/26/2018 BYOD Mobile learning Tools

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=528
Smartphones also provide an easy way for teachers to “inspire students to positively contribute to and responsibly participate in the digital world,” as espoused by the ISTE Standards for Educators.
research shows that when students are engaged in their learning — and they’re almost always engaged with their phones when given a choice — they are less likely to succumb to distractions.

1. Create short videos.

Videos can express any type of learning in any style, from music videos to interviews, book trailers, historical re-enactments, tutorials and stop animations.

Flipgrid is the one of the best educational video-creation sites

2. Access an online dictionary and thesaurus.

Find synonyms in many languages at Open Thesaurus!
Linguee
.

PONS or LEO. Question about a verb conjugation? Go to LEO or Canoo (for German)

3. Collaborate and share with Padlet and Twitter.

4. Scan QR codes.

5. Listen to podcasts and read the news.

6. Compete against classmates!

Quizlet and Kahoot, Gimkit

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=kahoot

6. Use the apps, obviously.

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Gartner predicts that nearly 38 percent of companies will stop providing devices to workers by 2017 — but 20 percent of those BYOD programs will fail because of overly restrictive mobile device management measures. So how can IT pros devise a BYOD strategy that stays afloat? Here are six guidelines to accommodate legitimate IT concerns without sinking a policy’s odds of success:

Look to Existing Policies

Before creating a BYOD policy, take a look at existing HR and legal procedures. Many email, VPN, and remote access security policies can be applied to mobile devices, as well.

Provide Training and Education

Employees are using personal devices at work, whether the company realizes it or not. But that doesn’t mean they are using them correctly. Employees often use  file-sharing and other tools of their choosing without IT’s knowledge, which could put sensitive corporate data at risk. Use a BYOD policy to trainemployees how to correctly use their applications

Specify Devices

BYOD isn’t limited to smartphones. According to Gartner, a “new norm” is emerging in which employees manage up to four or five devices at work.

Enforce Passwords and Encryption

passwords aren’t foolprool. Data encryption is an additional security measure

A smart BYOD policy doesn’t mean IT is off the hook. Rather, successful policies rely on IT and employees sharing security obligations.

Set Ownership Expectations

Employees often fail to realize that all data on their devices is discoverable, regardless of whether the device is personal or company-owned. The question of who owns what is still a legal gray area, though companies increasingly take the liberty to remote wipe employees’ personal devices once they leave their job. Avoid the guessing game with a clear exit strategy.

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more on BYOD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=byod
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

teen use of phones

Teens worry they use phones too much

Andrew M. Seaman

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/news/teens-worry-they-use-phones-too-much-2251987/

Roughly half of U.S. teens say they spend too much time on their cellphones, according to research from Pew. About the same proportion of teens report taking steps to limit their use of the devices. Another survey found that about two-thirds of parents also worry their children spend too much time in front of screens; nearly 60% of parents report setting screen time restrictions for their children. The findings come as some technology companies introduce features to cut back on phone addiction.

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn%3Ali%3Aactivity%3A6438043256424054784?lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_profile_view_base%3BK6U2j7wPTx2kZp6R0t9WBg%3D%3D&licu=urn%3Ali%3Acontrol%3Ad_flagship3_profile_view_base-view_activity_details

http://www.pewinternet.org/2018/08/22/how-teens-and-parents-navigate-screen-time-and-device-distractions/

Amid roiling debates about the impact of screen time on teenagers, roughly half of those ages 13 to 17 are themselves worried they spend too much time on their cellphones. Some 52% of U.S. teens report taking steps to cut back on their mobile phone use, and similar shares have tried to limit their use of social media (57%) or video games (58%), a new Pew Research Center survey finds.

Overall, 56% of teens associate the absence of their cellphone with at least one of these three emotions: loneliness, being upset or feeling anxious. Additionally, girls are more likely than boys to feel anxious or lonely without their cellphone.

The vast majority of teens in the United States have access to a smartphone, and 45% are online on a near constant basis. The ubiquity of social media and cellphones and other devices in teens’ lives has fueled heated discussions over the effects of excessive screen time and parents’ role in limiting teens’ screen exposure. In recent months, many major technology companies, including Google and Apple, have announced new products aimed at helping adults and teens monitor and manage their online usage.

Girls are somewhat more likely than boys to say they spend too much time on social media (47% vs. 35%).

Meanwhile, 31% of teens say they lose focus in class because they are checking their cellphone – though just 8% say this often happens to them, and 38% say it never does.

Girls are more likely than boys to express feelings of anxiety (by a 49% to 35% margin) and loneliness (by a 32% to 20% margin) when they do not have their phone with them.

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more on contemplative computing in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=contemplative+computing

mobile apps education

5 questions to ask before your university goes mobile

Here’s how to evaluate the potential for mobile solutions

Before they set foot in their first class, incoming college students face a maze of requirements and resources that will be critical to their success. So-called “student supports” abound. Yet forty percent of first-year students don’t return the following year, and a growing number report information overload as they navigate campus life amid newfound independence.

The nine in 10 undergraduates who own smartphones are probably familiar with the xkcd about it. College-aged Americans check their devices more than 150 times per day. So it should be no surprise that a growing body of research suggests that mobile solutions can play a critical role in enhancing the student experience.

1. Is the mobile app native?
We’ve all had the frustrating experience of using a smartphone to navigate a page that was designed for a computer. But when designing native mobile apps, developers start with the small screen, which leads to simpler, cleaner platforms that get rid of the clutter of the desktop browsing experience.

As smartphones overtake laptops and desktops as the most popular way for young people to get online, native design is critical for universities to embrace.

2. Is there a simple content management system?

It’s also critical to explore whether mobile apps integrate with an institution’s existing LMS, CMS, and academic platforms. The most effective apps will allow you to draw upon and translate existing content and resources directly into the mobile experience.
My note: this is why it is worth experimenting with alternatives to LMS, such as Facebook Groups: they allow ready-to-use SIMPLE mobile interface.

3. Does it allow you to take targeted action?

At-risk or disengaged students often require more targeted communication and engagement which, if used effectively, can prevent them falling into those categories in the first place.

Unlike web-based tools, mobile apps should not only communicate information, but also generate insights and reports, highlighting key information into how students use the platform.

4. Does it offer communication and social networking opportunities?

Teenagers who grew up with chatbots and Snapchat expect instant communication to be part of any online interaction. Instead of making students toggle between the student affairs office and conversations with advisors, mobile platforms that offer in-app messaging can streamline the experience and keep users engaged.

5. Does it empower your staff?

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more on mobile in education in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+education

phones in the classroom

3 Tips for Managing Phone Use in Class

Setting cell phone expectations early is key to accessing the learning potential of these devices and minimizing the distraction factor.
Liz Kolb September 11, 2017

https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-tips-managing-phone-use-class
Ten is now the average age when children receive their first cell phones
Build a digital citizenship curriculum that includes mobile device use.

Ask your students questions such as:

  • What do you like to do on your cell phone and why? (If they don’t have one, what would they like to do?)
  • What are the most popular apps and websites you use?
  • What do you think are inappropriate ways that cell phones have been used?
  • What is poor cell phone etiquette? Why?
  • How can cell phones help you learn?
  • How can cell phones distract from your learning?
  • How do you feel about your cell phone and the activities you do on your phone?
  • What should teachers know about your cell phone use that you worry we do not understand?
  • Do you know how to use your cell phone to gather information, to collaborate on academic projects, to evaluate websites?
  • How can we work together to create a positive mobile mental health?

Using a Stoplight Management Approach

Post a red button on the classroom door: the cell phone parking lot.

Post a yellow button on the classroom door: Students know their cell phones should be on silent (vibrate) and placed face down in the upper right-hand corner of their desk. They will be using them in class, but not the whole time.

Post a green button on the classroom door: Students know they should have their phones turned on (either silenced or set on vibrate) and placed face up in ready position to use throughout the class.

Establishing a Class Contract

Ask your students to help you develop social norms for what is and is not appropriate cell phone use during green and yellow button times. Should they be allowed to go on their social media networks during class? Why or why not?

Ask them to brainstorm consequences and write them into a class contract.

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more on the use of smart phones in the classroom in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=phone+classroom

trends mobile devices

Report: Google Gaining in U.S. Classrooms, Apple’s iOS Slipping

By Richard Chang 06/21/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/06/21/report-google-gaining-in-u.s.-classrooms-apples-ios-slipping.aspx

some of the findings in Kahoot!’s first-ever EdTrends Report :
Google is gaining a stronghold in United States classrooms, with Chrome OS expanding its presence on school computers, while Apple’s iOS has been on the decline since the first quarter of 2015 among students and teachers.

Chromebook had the highest number of users among teachers (44 percent) and students (46 percent), when they were asked about their top devices used. Google’s Productivity Suite (G Suite or Classroom) was the most widely used productivity suite in U.S. classrooms, with 57 percent saying they used it, compared to 23 percent saying they used Microsoft Office 365.

a majority of educators (more than 60 percent) said the purpose of adopting education technology was to increase student productivity and efficiency. Their key educational priorities for 2017-18 are “to improve student learning and outcomes” (88 percent), and to “better leverage available time and motivate students” (71 percent).

Educators saw the top ed tech trends in the next school year as:

  • Digital platforms for teaching, learning and assessment;
  • Personalized learning;
  • Computational thinking, coding and robotics;
  • Increased understanding of data; and
  • Gamificiation.

Some other key findings in the report include:

  • A majority of U.S. public school educators surveyed said they are challenged with budget restraints and lack of resources when it comes to implementing education technology;
  • A majority of U.S. private school educators said they lack training to understand or adopt new technology;
  • Many public and private school educators said they saw the adoption of “technology for the sake of technology” as a challenge;
  • Educators in California struggle with lack of training and “technology for the sake of technology,” while teachers in Texas struggle with bureaucracy, budget constraints and a lack of resources.

The complete report can be read on the Kahoot! website here. Kahoot! will be at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) conference

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Milwaukee Public Schools to Receive Hotspots, Tablets, Smartphones from Sprint

By Sri Ravipati 06/19/17

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/06/19/milwaukee-public-schools-to-receive-hotspots-tablets-smartphones-from-sprint.aspx

Milwaukee Public Schools (MPS), will be receiving some tech handouts from Sprint for the 2017-2018 school year. As part of the company’s 1Million Project — which aims to deliver high-speed internet access to 1 million high school students nationwide — more than 2,500 students at 25 MPS high schools will each receive either a hotspot device, tablet or smartphone.

MPS students will be receiving devices that come with 3GB of high-speed LTE data (with unlimited data available at 2G speeds if usage exceeds that amount). Students can keep their device up to four years while they are in high school no cost, according to initiative site. Additionally, devices are equipped with filters to block adult content that cannot be disabled and are Free Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) compliant.

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more about mobile devices in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+devices

use of laptops phones in the classroom

Why I’m Asking You Not to / Use Laptops

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https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-03-06-move-over-laptop-ban-this-professor-teaches-a-5-hour-tech-less-reading-class

research showing how laptops can be more of a distraction than a learning enabler. Purdue University even started blocking streaming websites such as Netflix, HBO, Hulu and Pandora.

But others say banning laptops can be counterproductive, arguing these devices can create opportunity for students to discover more information during class or collaborate. And that certain tools and technologies are necessary for learners who struggle in a traditional lecture format.

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Supiano, B. (2019, April 7). Digital Distraction Is a Problem Far Beyond the Classroom. But Professors Can Still Help. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://www.chronicle.com/article/Digital-Distraction-Is-a/246074
Flanigan, who studies self-regulation, or the processes students use to achieve their learning goals, began researching digital distraction after confronting it in the classroom as a graduate instructor.
Digital distraction tempts all of us, almost everywhere. That’s the premise of Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport, an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University.

The professor is upset. The professor has taken action, by banning laptops.
Bruff, whose next book, Intentional Tech: Principles to Guide the Use of Educational Technology in College Teaching, is set to be published this fall, is among the experts who think that’s a mistake. Why? Well, for one thing, he said, students are “going to have to graduate and get jobs and use laptops without being on Facebook all day.” The classroom should help prepare them for that.

 When Volk teaches a course with 50 or 60 students, he said, “the idea is to keep them moving.”Shifting the focal point away from the professor can help, too. “If they are in a small group with their colleagues,” Volk said, “very rarely will I see them on their laptops doing things they shouldn’t be.”
Professors may not see themselves as performers, but if they can’t get students’ attention, nothing else they do matters. “Learning doesn’t happen without attention,” said Lang, who is writing a book about digital distraction, Teaching Distracted Minds.
One aspect of distraction Lang plans to cover in his book is its history. It’s possible, he said, to regard our smartphones as either too similar or dissimilar from the distractions of the past. And it’s important, he said, to remember how new this technology really is, and how much we still don’t know about it.
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Study: Use of digital devices in class affects students’ long-term retention of information

  • A new study conducted by researchers at Rutgers University reveals that students who are distracted by texts, games, or videos while taking lecture notes on digital devices are far more likely to have their long-term memory affected and to perform more poorly on exams, even if short-term memory is not impacted, EdSurge reports.
  • Exam performance was not only poorer for students using the devices, but also for other students in classes that permitted the devices because of the distraction factor, the study found.
  • After conducting the study, Arnold Glass, the lead researcher, changed his own policy and no longer allows his students to take notes on digital devices.
A nationally representative Gallup poll conducted in March showed that 42% of K-12 teachers feel that the use of digital devices in the classroom are “mostly helpful” for students, while only 28% feel they are “mostly harmful.” Yet 69% of those same teachers feel the devices have a harmful impact on student mental health and 55% feel they negatively affect student physical health.
 According to a 2016 study of college students, student waste about 20% of their class time for “non-class” purposes — texting, emailing, or using social media more than 11 times in a typical day. In K-12, increased dependence on digital devices often interferes with homework completion as well.
Though the new study focused on long-term retention, past studies have also shown that indicate a negative correlation between use of digital devices during class and exam scores. A 2015 study by the London School of Economics revealed that pupils in schools that banned cell phones performed better on exams and that the differences were most notable for low-performing students.
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By Jack Grove Twitter: @jgro_the  April 4, 2017

Using laptops in class harms academic performance, study warns. Researchers say students who use computers score half a grade lower than those who write notes

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/using-laptops-in-class-harms-academic-performance-study-warns

findings, published in the journal Economics of Education Review in a paper, based on an analysis of the grades of about 5,600 students at a private US liberal arts college, found that using a laptop appeared to harm the grades of male and low-performing students most significantly.

While the authors were unable to definitively say why laptop use caused a “significant negative effect in grades”, the authors believe that classroom “cyber-slacking” plays a major role in lower achievement, with wi-fi-enabled computers providing numerous distractions for students.

April 07, 2006

A Law Professor Bans Laptops From the Classroom

http://www.chronicle.com/article/A-Law-Professor-Bans-Laptops/29048

by

Classroom Confrontation Over Student’s Laptop Use Leads to Professor’s Arrest

June 02, 2006

The Fight for Classroom Attention: Professor vs. Laptop

Some instructors ban computers or shut off Internet access, bringing complaints from students http://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Fight-for-Classroom/19431

Classroom Confrontation Over Student’s Laptop Use Leads to Professor’s Arrest

http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/ticker/classroom-confrontation-over-students-laptop-use-leads-to-professors-arrest/31832

by Anne Curzahttp://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2014/08/25/why-im-asking-you-not-to-use-laptops/

Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360131512002254

March 13, 2017

The Distracted Classroom

http://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Distracted-Classroom/239446

Welcome, Freshmen. Look at Me When I Talk to You.

http://www.chronicle.com/article/Welcome-Freshmen-Look-at-Me/237751

October 28, 2015

Memorization, Cheating, and Technology. What can we do to stem the increased use of phones and laptops to cheat on exams in class?

http://www.chronicle.com/article/Memorization-Cheating-and/233926

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The learning experience is different in schools that assign laptops, a survey finds

The learning experience is different in schools that assign laptops, a survey finds

High schoolers assigned a laptop or a Chromebook were more likely to take notes in class, do internet research, create documents to share, collaborate with their peers on projects, check their grades and get reminders about tests or homework due dates.

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https://teacheveryday.com/cellphones-in-the-classroom/

Blended Learning – the idea of incorporating technology into the every day experience of education – can save time, raise engagement, and increase student retention.

Lets face it, our students are addicted to their phones. Like…drugs addicted. It is not just a bad habit, it is hard wired in their brains(literally) to have the constant stimulation of their phones.

If you are interested in the research, there is a lot out there to read about how it happens and how bad it is.

Scientific American article published about a recent study of nomophobia – on adults (yes, many of us are addicted too).

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by

Best Practices for Laptops in the Classroom

http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/best-practices-for-laptops-in-the-classroom/39064

September 11, 2016

No, Banning Laptops Is Not the Answer. And it’s just as pointless to condemn any ban on electronic devices in the classroom

http://www.chronicle.com/article/No-Banning-Laptops-Is-Not-the/237752

by

Don’t Ban Laptops in the Classroom

http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/conversation/2014/09/23/dont-ban-laptops-in-the-classroom/

Use of Laptops in the Classroom: Research and Best Practices. Tomorrow’s Teaching and Learning

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1157

By

On Not Banning Laptops in the Classroom

http://techist.mcclurken.org/learning/on-not-banning-laptops-in-the-classroom/

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F January 26, 2001

Colleges Differ on Costs and Benefits of ‘Ubiquitous’ Computing

http://www.chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Differ-on-Costs-and/17848

“Bring Your Own Device” Policies?

http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/bring-your-own-device-policies/42732

June 13, 2014, 2:40 pm By Robert Talbert

Three issues with the case for banning laptops

http://www.chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2014/06/13/three-issues-with-the-case-for-banning-laptops/

3 Tips for Managing Phone Use in Class

Setting cell phone expectations early is key to accessing the learning potential of these devices and minimizing the distraction factor.

https://www.edutopia.org/article/3-tips-managing-phone-use-class

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more on mobile learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

mobile learning tips

Tap into These 5 Tips for Mobile Learning

A master in mobile learning shares his best advice for rebooting your instruction.

By Dian Schaffhauser 12/13/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/12/13/tap-into-these-5-tips-for-mobile-learning.aspx

1) Find Out What Devices Are Really in Use

instructors have to take device choices into consideration when they’re choosing apps

2) Teach Not Just for Consumption but for Curation

Students use their phones to capture video or audio interviews and post them to Twitter’s live streaming service, Periscope, at various times throughout the course.

3) Try Texting for Exam Review

As an alternative, he began texting review questions every few hours for the next exam and found that he was getting a “much higher frequency of interaction.” Teacher Text, as he called it, never supplied the answers, just questions — sometimes multiple choice and other times open-ended. To keep students’ interest, he’d use at least a few of those questions on the actual test. “They’re going to be more inclined to pay attention to every question because I may give them 50 questions of review and have four or five of those on the test,” he said.

The result: “Grades started to climb pretty quickly.”

4) Perform Safe Texting, but Try It Everywhere

adopted remind from iKeepSafe, a free service that provides an interface between the teacher and the students for the purposes of texting. The tool has simplified the process of instructor texting, a practice that has overall helped students “to feel more connected.”

5) Fit Your Mobile Approach to Your Subject

[flashcard apps] like Quizlet and StudyBlue that can replicate the ongoing study or rehearsal of learning

might stream a quick lesson on the fly through Periscope or hold a 15-minute class discussion through a chat on Twitter.

“I’ll just say, ‘Here’s my hashtag, and I’m going to be live here at 9 to 9:15 p.m. Central time,'” he explained. He typically intends to broadcast a question about every five minutes and allow people to respond. “It’s interesting. You shoot out one question and you get bombarded. People are putting resources in there. In 15 minutes, I’ve barely gotten two questions off. But they have the hashtag and they can go back and harvest the resources that other people put up.”

6) Channel Your Students

Speak the language your learners listen in.’

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more on mobile learning in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+learning

more on curation in this blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=curation

Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

Book Announcement: Implementing Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

New book: Implementing Mobile Language Learning Technologies in Japan

by Steve McCarty, Hiroyuki Obari, and Takeshi Sato

Publisher: Springer Singapore / SpringerBriefs in Education (107 pages)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction: Contextualizing Mobile Language Learning in Japan

Chapter 2 Mobile Language Learning Pedagogy: A Sociocultural Perspective

Chapter 3 Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology Case Study:

Smartphone App LINE for EFL Peer Learning

Chapter 4 Osaka Jogakuin University Case Study:

Mobilizing the EFL Curriculum and Campus Infrastructure with iPods and iPads

Chapter 5 Aoyama Gakuin University Case Study:

Blended Learning and Flipped Classrooms utilizing Mobile Devices

Chapter 6 Conclusion: Implementing Language Learning in a Mobile-Oriented Society

Abstract

This book explores theoretical and practical aspects of implementing mobile language learning in university classrooms for English as a Foreign Language in Japan. The technologies utilized, such as smartphones, iPads, and wi-fi, integrate students’ hand-held devices into the campus network infrastructure. The pedagogical aims of ubiquitous mobile learning further incorporate social media, blended learning, and flipped classroom approaches into the curriculum. Chapter 1 defines mobile language learning within dimensions of e-learning and technology-assisted language learning, prior to tracing the development of mobile learning in Japan. Chapter 2 documents the sociocultural theory underpinning the authors’ humanistic approach to implementation of mobile technologies. The sociocultural pedagogy represents a global consensus of leading educators that also recognizes the agency of Asian learners and brings out their capability for autonomous learning. Case studies of universities, large and small, public and private, are organized similarly in Chapters 3 to 5. Institutional/pedagogical and technological context sections are followed by detailed content on the implementation of initiatives, assessment of effectiveness, and recommendations for other institutions. Distinct from a collection of papers, this monograph tells a story in brief book length about theorizing and realizing mobile language learning, describing pioneering and original initiatives of importance to practitioners in other educational contexts.

Authors

Steve McCarty lectures for Kansai University, Osaka Jogakuin University, KIC Graduate School of IT, and the government agency JICA.

Hiroyuki Obari, PhD in Computer Science, is a Professor at the Aoyama Gakuin University College of Economics in Tokyo.

Takeshi Sato is an Associate Professor at the Division of Language and Culture Studies, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.

Ordering information from Springer

Paperback (ISBN: 978-981-10-2449-8):

http://www.springer.com/us/book/9789811024498

eBook (ISBN: 978-981-10-2451-1) or individual chapters:

http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-981-10-2451-1

 

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more on mobile technologies in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+devices

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