Socia Media: Marketing and Experts

Two recent articles can help you understand better and select apps to boost your institutional social media activities:

How Do You Identify a Social Media Expert?

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/how-do-you-identify-social-media-expert

7 Must-Have Networking Apps to Boost Your Social Media Marketing

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/networking-apps/

 

Of Mice and Men: iPads, smartboards and how we acquire technology for education

in the latest news about scandals regarding technology acquisition for schools, it is only fair to ask ourselves:
how much involved do we WANT/NEED to be in the decision making process regarding such timely issue.
How much do we need to educate ourselves on 1. technology? 2. application of technology in education? compatible choices of technology, including performance, prices and brands? Do we discuss such issues or just let people above us and/or elected by us make the choices? What is your opinion?

What is your opinion about open source and alternative mobile devices?

The LA School iPad Scandal: What You Need To Know

http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/08/27/343549939/the-l-a-school-ipad-scandal-what-you-need-to-know

26 Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Updates

26 Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Updates

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/26-ideas-social-media-updates/

#1: Attention-Grabbing Quotes

#2: Book Recommendations

#3: Celebrate Company Milestones

#4: Dates That Are Fun Celebrations

#5: Evergreen Content

#6: Feature Hashtagged Events

#7: Giveaways and Contests

#8: Help Out by Answering Questions

#9: Interview Staff Members

#10: Jokes and Lighthearted Posts

#11: Kids’ Photos

#12: Link to Useful Content

#13: Mention Others in Your Industry

#14: Negative Posts (Generally Avoid!)

#15: Outtakes and Mistakes

#17: Questions for Your Audience

#18: Reply to Messages

#19: Share Other People’s Updates

#20: Thank Someone Who Helped Out

#21: Ultimate Lists of Resources

#22: Visual Content

#23: Weekly Themed Posts

#24: X vs. Y

#25: “You” (Your Audience)

#26: Zen-Like Calm When Responding

Creative Ways to Publish Social Media Update

 

FAA Has Commercial Drone Regulations Backwards

Drone entrepreneurs frustrated as FAA regulation remains up in the air

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/drones-unmanned-aircraft-pushing-limits-of-the-law/

FAA Has Commercial Drone Regulations Backwards

http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregorymcneal/2014/07/01/faa-struggling-to-deal-with-drones-now-going-after-realtors-and-farmers/

The FAA’s position is as simple as it is inane.  If a realtor films buildings for fun using a remote controlled quadcopter that’s legal.  But if she takes that same quadcopter and films buildings as part of her job, that is illegal.  If a farmer flies a model aircraft over his cornfield doing barrel rolls and loops, that’s legal.  But if he uses the same model airplane to determine how to conserve water or use less fertilizer that’s illegal.  This is government regulation at its worst.

The FAA decision is a reversal from the initiatives entertained at different universities:

Drone Technology Advancements Yield New Education Opportunities

http://www.govtech.com/education/Drone-Technology-Advancements-Yield-New-Education-Opportunities-.html

Two universities operate drones and teach journalism students how to use them

http://www.chicagoreader.com/Bleader/archives/2013/02/26/two-universities-operate-drones-and-teach-journalism-students-how-to-use-them

read more:

U.S. Lags As Commercial Drones Take Off Around Globe

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/03/17/us-drones-_n_4978768.html

Please Don’t Be the One to Get Drones Banned

http://petapixel.com/2014/08/27/take-get-drones-banned/

 

 

 

 

Taming the wild west of cloud acquisition

Taming the wild west of cloud acquisition

http://fcw.com/Articles/2014/08/26/Acquisition-Matters-Cloud.aspx

Homeowners and building managers buy water service rather than the water itself, eliminating the need to purify, regulate and distribute the water on their own. Agencies buy cloud computing on the same “as-a-service” model to reduce their need to own and maintain IT equipment and applications.

Horizon Report 2014, Library edition

http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2014-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN.pdf

p. 4 new and rapidly changing technologies, an abundance of digital information in myriad formats, an increased understanding of how students learn evolving research methods, and changing practices in how scholars communicate and disseminate their research and creative work.

Engagement requires an outward focus

A liaison who understands how scholars in a particular discipline communicate and share
information with one another can inform the design and development of new publishing services, such as
digital institutional repositories.

Liaisons cannot be experts themselves in each new capability, but knowing when to call in a
colleague, or how to describe appropriate expert capabilities to faculty, will be key to the new liaison role.

an increasing focus on what users do (research, teaching, and learning) rather than on what librarians do (collections, reference, library instruction).

hybrid model, where liaisons pair their expertise with that of functional specialists, both within and outside of libraries

p. 6 Trend 1: Develop user-centered library services

Many libraries are challenged to brand such a service point, citing a “hub” or “center” to refer to services that can include circulation, reference, computer support, writing assistance, and more.

For liaisons, time at a reference desk has been replaced by anticipating recurrent needs and developing
easily accessible online materials (e.g., LibGuides, screencasts) available to anyone at any time, and
by providing more advanced one-on-one consultations with students, instructors, and researchers who
need expert help. Liaisons not only answer questions using library resources, but they also advise and
collaborate on issues of copyright, scholarly communication, data management, knowledge management,
and information literacy. The base level of knowledge that a liaison must possess is much broader than
familiarity with a reference collection or facility with online searching; instead, they must constantly keep up
with evolving pedagogies and research methods, rapidly developing tools, technologies, and ever-changing
policies that facilitate and inform teaching, learning, and research in their assigned disciplines.

Librarians at many institutions are now focusing on collaborating with faculty to develop thoughtful assignments
and provide online instructional materials that are built into key courses within a curriculum and provide
scaffolding to help students develop library research skills over the course of their academic careers

p. 7 Trend 2: A hybrid model of liaison and functional specialist is emerging.

Current specialist areas of expertise include copyright, geographic information systems (GIS), media production and integration, distributed education or e-learning, data management, emerging technologies,
user experience, instructional design, and bioinformatics.

At the University of Guelph, the liaison model was abandoned altogether in favor of a functional specialist
approach

p. 8 Trend 3: Organizational flexibility must meet changing user needs.

p. 9 provide education and consultation services for personal information management. Tools, workshops, websites, and individual consults are offered in areas such as citation management, productivity tools, managing alerts and feeds, personal archiving, and using social networking for teaching and professional development.

p. 11 data management, knowledge management and scholarly communication

digital scholarship

p. 12 Liaisons need to be able to provide a general level of knowledge about copyright, data management, the need for metadata and the ontologies available in their disciplines.

p. 13 Liaisons need to be able to provide a general level of knowledge about copyright, data management, the need for metadata and the ontologies available in their disciplines.

p. 16 replacing the traditional tripartite model of collections, reference, and instruction