Searching for "corona virus"

political divide education corona virus

https://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2020/04/many-parents-coronavirus-impact-learning-shrug-off.html

Two important caveats: The ability to access the internet is crucial for the survey respondents. And the poll has a relatively significant margin of error.

The coronavirus pandemic has forced the vast majority of schools nationwide to close for several weeks; several states and U.S. territories have closed their schools’ doors for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year. At the same time, states and districts have rushed to get remote learning sessions up and running, with varying success.

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more on education and politics in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=education+politics

Big Data AI coronavirus

South Korea winning the fight against coronavirus using big-data and AI

https://www.thedailystar.net/online/news/south-korea-winning-the-fight-against-coronavirus-using-big-data-and-ai-1880737

South Korea is using the analysis, information and references provided by this integrated data — all different real-time responses and information produced by the platform are promptly conveyed to people with different AI-based applications.

Whenever someone is tested positive for COVID-19, all the people in the vicinity are provided with the infected person’s travel details, activities, and commute maps for the previous two weeks through mobile notifications sent as a push system.

Zoom Twitch DOOM or VR

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more on education responding to corona virus in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=corona+virus

#COVID-19

Bryan Alexander’s analysis of the the situation with Corona Virus and Higher Ed has wide response on Twitter:

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more on Bryan Alexander in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bryan+alexander

Shield vs Mask

What is better: face shield or face mask?

faculty discussion on the issue can be found here:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/621278065169562/
If you don’t have FB account and/or more info needed, please contact us.

Here more information:

‘Only those with plastic visors were infected’: Swiss government warns against face shields

July 15, 2020
https://www.thelocal.ch/20200715/only-those-with-plastic-visors-were-infected-swiss-government-warns-against-face-shields

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Face Mask vs Face Shield: Which Is More Effective Against Coronavirus?

https://www.ibtimes.com/face-mask-vs-face-shield-which-more-effective-against-coronavirus-3013922

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Is a Face Shield Better Protection Against the Coronavirus Than a Face Mask?

May 28, 2020

https://www.health.com/condition/infectious-diseases/coronavirus/face-shield-coronavirus

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June 29, 2020

college leaders and return to campus

College Leaders Must Explain Why—Not Just How—to Return to Campus

By Kevin R. McClure     Jun 25, 2020

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2020-06-25-college-leaders-must-explain-why-not-just-how-to-return-to-campus

So far, the why question seems harder for many institutions and their leaders to forthrightly answer, yet it is vitally important.

Presidents have also shared their views through anonymous surveys, highlighting worries about hitting enrollment targets or managing revenue losses. There is an unmistakable sense that they see their responsibility mainly in institutional terms: We must resume in-person instruction to ensure the financial viability of the college or university. Protecting institutions’ budgets is apparently also worth the risk.

Rationales like these have gaping holes. Some problems are obvious, like being silent on the health and safety of faculty, staff, students and community members who aren’t aged 18 to 25. The disregard for people working on and near campuses recalls practices at an Amazon warehouse or meat-packing plant, where the expectation is that workers must show up in the interests of the organization and consumer.

The rationales I’ve seen are problematic for other reasons, too. First, they show little concern for slowing or stopping the spread of COVID-19.

Second, they demonstrate a disregard for serving the public good. I haven’t read a single announcement or plan that anchors an institution’s decisionmaking in shared community interests. Few presidents are willing to say that what the public needs right now is to live in a society free of a deadly virus, and that it is the responsibility of higher education to contribute to that effort by keeping people off campuses that were often

Third, the rationales I’ve seen don’t seriously contend with the differential effects of the pandemic by race and income. Racism means that people of color are more exposed and less protected when it comes to the virus. When a president says returning to campus is worth the risk, who is bearing the burden of that risk-taking?

Finally, the plans I’ve seen have a strained relationship with truth and science. In many states, new virus cases and hospitalizations are rising, with clusters in nursing homes and daycare centers. Yet presidents continue to announce that it is safe for students to return to residence halls.

Katherine Newman, president of the University of Massachusetts Boston, provided an example that other presidents could follow by announcing that the institution would continue to be primarily online in the fall. Explaining this decision, she noted that that Black and Latinx “populations have borne a disproportionate burden of morbidity and mortality in the pandemic, and many students live in multi-generational minority households where exposure to the virus would be particularly problematic.”

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