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snapchat education

High Schools Experiment With Snapchat to Reach Teens

http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/high-school-notes/2016/03/14/high-schools-experiment-with-snapchat-to-reach-teens

My note: the US News and World Report is behind times on its reporting, unless this article has been held for a while by their editor: teenagers moved from Snapchat as quickly as they moved away from Facebook to Twitter and from Twitter to Snapchat. The generation, which is running US News and World Report is way too slow to notice the nomadic social media moves of the Millennials.

Here is the January 2016, exchange among faculty on the blend/online education listserv, which could’ve helped the author, Alexandra Pannoni line up with the times:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/11/social-network-highered/

The cited case from Nebraska, Katelyn Gilroy, a library media specialist, who is using Snapchat or school purposes, can undoubtedly have a niche in education, enticing students to learn about their library, reading, etc.

However, it is questionable to present the media specialist’s case from Nebraska as a blank statement; a case, which can be adopted nationwide. Ms. Pannoni fails to mention that since 15 years ago, when instant messaging was the “snapchat” of the times, U.S. students consider these applications their “virtual mall,” where they like to hang out, but are not keen to consider them for educational purposes. In the same fashion, U.S. students are somehow unique in considering Facebook, later Twitter, then Snapchat and now Kik, Yammer, Celly, or Elgg a domain reserved for their private, extracurricular activities.

More about use of social media in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=social+media+education&submit=Search

election guide

Election Guide: 5 Education Takeaways From the Presidential Candidates

http://www.edweek.org/ew/section/multimedia/election-guide-5-education-takeaways-from-candidates.html

Nice outline of the presidential candidates views on K12

The major party hopefuls still in the race as of last week boasted widely varied records and stances on K-12. (Download as a PDF.)

Related: How Meaty Are the Presidential Candidates’ Online K-12 Positions?

 

best time to post on social media

What Are The Best Times to Post on Social Media

Neil Patel on January 2, 2015

https://www.quicksprout.com/2015/01/02/what-are-the-best-times-to-post-on-social-media/

Best Times to Post on Social Media

The Best (And Worst) Times To Post On Social Media (Infographic)

http://www.fastcompany.com/3036184/how-to-be-a-success-at-everything/the-best-and-worst-times-to-post-on-social-media-infograph

 Best Times to Post on Social Media

probably the most detailed break down:

A Scientific Guide to Posting Tweets, Facebook Posts …

https://blog.bufferapp.com/best-time-to-tweet-post-to-facebook-send-emails-publish-blogposts

and several others:

The Best Times to Post on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn & Other Social Media Sites [Infographic]

http://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/best-times-post-pin-tweet-social-media-infographic

When’s the Best Day and Time to Post on Social Media?

this one talks about the use of Hootsuite and likes, might be worth looking at it:
http://www.socialmediatoday.com/content/best-times-post-social-media-infographic

10 Dangerous Apps

Parents, If Your Kids Have Any of These 10 Dangerous Apps, It’s Time to Hit “Delete”

Sex educator Megan Maas has the scoop on 10 apps that can be very dangerous for your kids, and what you need to know about them.

http://www.foreverymom.com/parents-kids-10-dangerous-apps-time-hit-delete/

You may be thinking your kids are downloading apps because they are just a simple way for them to keep in contact with their friends. This is certainly true for most kids, but unfortunately, even innocent use of most of these apps can land a kid in a situation he/she never intended to be in. Here are some potentially dangerous apps that are popular among kids:

1. 
Tinder

2. Snapchat: This app allows a user to send photos and videos to anyone on his/her friend list.

3. Blendr: A flirting app used to meet new people through GPS location services.
4. Kik Messenger: An instant messaging app with over 100 million users that allows users to exchange videos, pics and sketches.

5. Whisper: Whisper is an anonymous confession app. It allows users to superimpose text over a picture in order to share their thoughts and feelings anonymously.
6. Ask.fm: Ask.fm is one of the most popular social networking sites that is almost exclusively used by kids.

7. Yik Yak: An app that allows users to post text-only “Yaks” of up to 200 characters.

8. Poof

9. Omegle: This app is primarily used for video chatting. When you use Omegle, you do not identify yourself through the service.

10. Down: This app, which used to be called Bang With Friends, is connected to Facebook

honors and shame

221 HONORS.
The Honor System:
A Comparison Between the U.S. South and the Mediterranean World

Plamen Miltenoff, MLIS, Ph.D.

Meeting Times & Places

5:00 pm – 7:30 pm Wednesdays Miller Center 206

  • Asynchronous interaction:
    • Most of the discussions will occur asynchronously in the D2L “Discussion” area.
    • Use of Web 2.0 tools such as blogs and wikis is strongly encouraged.
    • Use of Web 2.0 tools such as social networking sites (e.g., Facebook) only after consultation with the instructor

Contact Information

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The best way to contact me is through email, but you can use any of the options below.

Email: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
Phone: 320-308-3072
Web Site: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty
Office Location: Miller Center, 204-J

Course Description:

The Honor system is a phenomenon well known in many cultures across the globe and strongly presented in cultures since Ancient Greece and Rome. The concepts of honor and shame have long been associated with cultures in the Mediterranean region mostly because the first scholars to study the social impact of these concepts did so in Southern Europe. Honor has two fundamental components: birth and morality. People could gain or lose their honor by the morality of their conduct. Despite the scholarly emphasis on the Mediterranean, the concept of honor influenced social systems all over the world, and historians are beginning to detect its traces in places as different as China and Africa. The Southern Honor system can firmly be traced back in the European roots and determined to a great degree the American history of the 19th century.

This course will study the geography, history, sociology and religions, cultural and political systems of two worlds and learn to compare the findings. Based on those comparisons, lessons in gender, culture and politics will be drawn.

  1. What is Honor and Shame system and why is it so important to know about it and recognize it
  2. What is the connection between the Honor system in the Mediterranean and in the American South
  3. How does the knowledge of the Honor system aim our daily actions and our global perspective

Course Goals

Students in this course will

  • Practice research methods and ability to find and evaluate information as well as select reliable information technologies.
  • Explore applications and technologies for communication and creative collaboration.
  • Gain practical, hands-on experience with a wide variety of research and online communication tools.
  • Students will demonstrate ability to research and find academically reliable information from peer-reviewed sources in the online databases, which SCSU is subscribed. Students will demonstrate ability to find and evaluate information from the Internet.
  • Students will demonstrate competencies in creation of textual and multimedia narratives in individual and collaborative environment.
  • Students will demonstrate competencies in application of technology toward creation and dissemination of textual and multimedia materials.

Attendance/Discussion Requirements

  • Attendance is required. If you cannot attend class, it is required to alert the instructor in advance. If the reason for the absence is an emergency, it is expected to approach the instructor and provide an explanation thereafter about the character of the emergency.
  • Discussion are expected. If you are shy and are hesitant to participate in class, you must compensate with the use of other communication tools (e.g., D2L Discussion List).

Assignment Descriptions

  • Discussions. You are expected to contribute to each class session with your ideas and your responses to the ideas of your peers. Your comments are expected in class and in between class sessions (using, e.g., D2L discussion list). Your comments must go beyond “yes, I agree,” and “no, I disagree” and provide analysis and synthesis of your thoughts.
  • Readings – you will be expected to contribute to each class sessions with bibliographical findings on your own.
  • Written responses – you will be expected to deliver four written responses to peer-reviewed articles related to topics discussed in the class sessions.
  • Final project – you will be expected to write and present a final project. The written part of the project will be in the realm of 4-5000 words; will adhere to academic research and style; will include a bibliography with at least 2/3 of the sources being peer-reviewed and outside of the 5000 words. The presentation can be of any multimedia form, whereas it will be peer-evaluated, but my (instructor’s) preference will be given to advance multimedia presentations (beyond PPT and using e.g. Prezy, iMovie/Moviemaker movie and/or audio narration)

Course Policies

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Late Assignment Policy

All assignments should be submitted by midnight of the date on which they are due. Ten percent of an assignment’s point value will be removed for each day an assignment is late. This policy will be adjusted on a case-by-case basis if emergencies prevent you from submitting an assignment on time. In these situations, contact me as soon as is reasonable to determine how this policy can be adjusted in a way that meets your needs and is still fair to other students.

Grading

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The grade book in D2L will be used to show detailed information about grades in this course. The table below shows the value of each assignment and the total number of points available.

  Overall Grade
94% – 100% = A
90 % – 93.99% = A-
86% – 89.99% = B+
83% – 85.99% = B
80% – 82.99% = B-
70% – 79.99% = C
60% – 69.99% = D
59.99% or lower = F

 

Assignments Schedule

WEEK 1. August 28
Reading[s]:
Peruse through all articles in the D2L content area. Choose one article to your liking and be ready to reflect on it.Assignment[s]:
1. complete entry survey. 2. Prepare to present in coherent and concise manner your understanding of Honors and Shame and discuss the goals for this course. 3. Enter a short essay in the D2L discussion on how do you see applying the knowledge from this course in your future studies, research and work
Introduction.  Orientation, class parameters and familiarizing with the syllabus. Questions and issues. Course goals What is an/the Honor System? Entry Interview (D2L survey is completed and analyzed). Why explore this topic and these vastly different geographic entities (US South and the Mediterranean). Define interest in this class and interest for a project; how this class can help your studies? Your career? All over as a human being?
WEEK 2.Sept 4

Reading[s]:
BUSATTA, S. (2006). Honour and Shame in the Mediterranean. Antrocom, 2(2). 75-78. Retrieved March 19, 2013, from http://www.academia.edu/524890/Honour_and_Shame_in_the_Mediterranean
Moxnes, V. (1996). Honor and Shame. In R. L. Rohrbaugh (Ed.). The Social Sciences and New Testament Interpretation (pp. 19-40). Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson.   http://tinyurl.com/qdvc499. (p. 24-26).
Osiek, C. (2008). Women, honor, and context in Mediterranean antiquity, 64(1), 323–337. doi:10.4102/hts.v64i1.2
Esmer, T. U. (n.d.). Honor in Ottoman and Contemporary Mediterranean Societies: Controversies, Continuities, and New Directions. conference announcement. Retrieved from http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=196551

Assignment[s]: 1. Find an article on Honor and Shame. 2. Outline in two paragraphs the content of one of the three articles and in a third paragraph compare to your findings; use academic style to log your responses. If you have hesitation about your style, please check with the Write Place, your peers and me.

Why research? Work on the reading material for class

Find articles for the course.

What is academic research? What is a peer-review article? When and how research the Internet. How do I access and keep track of resources.
RefWorks versus Zotero and Mendeley
What is an academic paper. How do I write an academic paper. The Write place.
Making plans: final project
WEEK 3. Sept 11

Reading[s]:
Osiek, C. (2008). Women, honor, and context in Mediterranean antiquity, 64(1), 323–337. doi:10.4102/hts.v64i1.2
Smith, A. (2004). Murder in Jerba: Honour, Shame and Hospitality among Maltese in Ottoman Tunisia. History and Anthropology Routledge, 15(2), 107–132.
Harris, J. W. (2002). Honor, Grace, and War (But Not Slavery?) in Southern Culture. Reviews in American History, 30(1), 1–7. doi:10.2307/30031707

Assignment[s]:
Your first written response is due in the D2L   dropbox. Your response must adhere to the requirements of an academic paper, including in-text citation and bibliography.

Honors and Shame from a historical perspective Do we have a robust theory/notion about the Honor/Shame system through the centuries? Do you think tracking that model through centuries helps in the 21st century? If yes, how and if no, why?
WEEK 4. Sept 18

Reading[s]: Fernand Braudel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernand_Braudel) and the Annales School
Santos, N. F. (2008). Family, Patronage, and Social Contests: Narrative Reversals in the Gospel of Mark. S&J, (2). (footnote p. 200).
Hall, J. L. (1907). Half-hours in southern history. B. F. Johnson publishing co.
Harrell, L. A. (2009, December 4). It’s an honorable choice: Rebellions Against Southern Honor in William Styron’s The Confessions of Nat Turner. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2614

Assignment[s]:
Your second written response is due in the D2L dropbox. Your response must adhere to the requirements of an academic paper, including in-text citation and bibliography.

Honors and Shame from a geographic perspective Is there a “southern” connection (Mediterranean is the European South)? Can be Annale School be right (geography and relief determines history)? To what degree geography and geographical conditions determine such models (Honor/Shame)?
WEEK 5. Sept 25

Reading[s]: Crook, Z. (2009). Honor, Shame, and Social Status Revisited. Journal of Biblical Literature, 128(3), 591–611.
Moxnes, V. (1996). Honor and Shame. In R. L. Rohrbaugh (Ed.). The Social Sciences and New Testament Interpretation (pp. 19-40). Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson. http://tinyurl.com/qdvc499 (p. 22)
Lever, A. (1986). Honour as a Red Herring. Critique of Anthropology, 6(3), 83–106. doi:10.1177/0308275X8600600305

Assignment[s]:
Your third written response is due in the D2L   dropbox. Your response must adhere to the requirements of an academic paper, including in-text citation and bibliography.

Honors and Shame from a cultural perspective. Gender roles, Masculinity Does the Honor/Shame model help understand gender roles, social status, masculinity etc.?
WEEK 6. Oct 2

Reading[s]:
Crook, Z. (2009). Honor, Shame, and Social Status Revisited. Journal of Biblical Literature, 128(3), 591–611. (p. 593)
Moxnes, V. (1996). Honor and Shame. In R. L. Rohrbaugh (Ed.). The Social Sciences and New Testament Interpretation (pp. 19-40). Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson. http://tinyurl.com/qdvc499. (p. 26-27; p. 30-33).
Cohen, D. (n.d.). Insult, Aggression, and the Southern Culture of Honor: An “Experimental Ethnography.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70(5), 945–960.
Harris, J. W. (2002). Honor, Grace, and War (But Not Slavery?) in Southern Culture. Reviews in American History, 30(1), 1–7. doi:10.2307/30031707

Assignment[s]:
Your forth written response is due in the D2L   dropbox. Your response must adhere to the requirements of an academic paper, including in-text citation and bibliography.

Honors and Shame from a political and social perspective Can Honor/Shame be connected with the current political situation in Egypt, Syria, Turkey? Did Honor/Shame system influence decision in American history?
WEEK 7. Wednesday Oct 9

Assignment[s]: final project details

Start working on the final project Present and discuss your final project: 1. Finalized title 2. Outline 3. Plan 4. Clear work distribution among group members 5. Clear way for peer assessment.
 WEEK 8. Wednesday Oct 16
Assignment[s]: details on final project
Final brainstorming and start working on the project Meeting as a whole: 1. Present group’s plan to class. 2. Share group’s ideas with class. 3. Share technology 4. Share sources 5. Share means for peer assessment
WEEK 9. Wednesday Oct 23

Assignment[s]: draft of bibliography

Class as a whole: peer review and brainstorming Meeting as a whole: 1. Are sources reliable? 2. Are sources of academic origin (peer-reviewed)? 3. Is the bibliography adhering correctly to the formats (APA, Chicago, ALA)
WEEK 10. Wednesday Oct 30

Assignment[s]: details on presentation

Work on the final project Meeting as a whole: 1. Presentation format 2. Share technology 3. Share ideas
WEEK 11. Wednesday Nov 6
Assignment[s]: paper draft due in D2L dropbox
Work on final project Meeting as a whole: share group’s progress and seek other group’s feedback
WEEK 12. Wednesday Nov 13
Assignment[s]: paper draft and presentation
Work on project Meeting as a whole: share group’s progress and seek other group’s feedback
WEEK 13. Wednesday Nov 20
Assignment[s]: paper draft due in D2L dropbox
Work on project Meeting as a whole: share group’s progress and seek other group’s feedback
WEEK 13. Wednesday Nov 27
Work on project Meeting as a whole: share group’s progress and seek other group’s feedback
WEEK 13. Wednesday Dec 4
Assignment[s]: paper final draft due in D2L dropbox
presentations Class presentations of the final projects
WEEK 13. Wednesday Dec 11
presentations Class presentations of the final projects

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Bertram Wyatt-Brown. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://personal.tcu.edu/swoodworth/Wyatt-Brown.htm

Brayford, S. A. (1999). TO SHAME OR NOT TO SHAME: SEXUALITY IN THE MEDITERRANEAN DIASPORA. Semeia, (87), 163.

BUSATTA, S. (2006). Honour and Shame in the Mediterranean. Antrocom, 2(2). 75-78. Retrieved March 19, 2013, from http://www.academia.edu/524890/Honour_and_Shame_in_the_Mediterranean

Cohen, D. (n.d.). Insult, Aggression, and the Southern Culture of Honor: An “Experimental Ethnography.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 70(5), 945–960.

Crook, Z. (2009). Honor, Shame, and Social Status Revisited. Journal of Biblical Literature, 128(3), 591–611.

Culture of honor (Southern United States). (n.d.). Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_honor_(Southern_United_States)

Dussere, E. (2001). The Debts of History: Southern Honor, Affirmative Action, and Faulkner’s Intruder in the Dust. Faulkner Journal, 17(1), 37–57.

Esmer, T. U. (n.d.). Honor in Ottoman and Contemporary Mediterranean Societies: Controversies, Continuities, and New Directions. conference announcement. Retrieved from http://www.h-net.org/announce/show.cgi?ID=196551

Family, Patronage, and Social Contests.pdf. (n.d.).

Hall, J. L. (1907). Half-hours in southern history. B. F. Johnson publishing co.

Harrell, L. A. (2009, December 4). It’s an honorable choice: Rebellions Against Southern Honor in William Styron’s The Confessions of Nat Turner. Retrieved from http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/2614

Harris, J. W. (2002). Honor, Grace, and War (But Not Slavery?) in Southern Culture. Reviews in American History, 30(1), 1–7. doi:10.2307/30031707

Hellerman. (n.d.). Reconstructing Honor in Roman Philippi. Cambridge University Press.

Herzfeld, M. (1980). Honour and Shame: Problems in the Comparative Analysis of Moral Systems. Man, 15(2), 339–351. doi:10.2307/2801675

Honor, Shame, and Social Status.pdf. (n.d.).

honor-04-Antrocom_Honour and Shame in the Mediterranean_S.pdf. (n.d.).

Honors and Shame and the Unity of the Mediterranean. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3317790

Honour and shame (Anthropology). (n.d.). Retrieved from http://what-when-how.com/social-and-cultural-anthropology/honour-and-shame-anthropology/

Lever, A. (1986). Honour as a Red Herring. Critique of Anthropology, 6(3), 83–106. doi:10.1177/0308275X8600600305

Manly Honor Part V: Honor in the American South. (n.d.). The Art of Manliness. Retrieved August 15, 2013, from http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/11/26/manly-honor-part-v-honor-in-the-american-south/

Moxnes, V. (1996). Honor and Shame. In R. L. Rohrbaugh (Ed.). The Social Sciences and New Testament Interpretation (pp. 19-40). Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson. http://tinyurl.com/qdvc499

Murder in Jerba_ Honour, Shame and.pdf. (n.d.).

Osiek, C. (2008). Women, honor, and context in Mediterranean antiquity, 64(1), 323–337. doi:10.4102/hts.v64i1.2

Peoples and Cultures of the Mediterranean. (n.d.). Retrieved March 19, 2013, from http://www.academia.edu/2437701/Peoples_and_Cultures_of_the_Mediterranean

Rabichev, R. (n.d.). The Mediterranean concepts of honour and shame as seen in the depiction of the biblical women. Retrieved from http://prophetess.lstc.edu/~rklein/Doc6/renata.htm

Santos, N. F. (2008). Family, Patronage, and Social Contests: Narrative Reversals in the Gospel of Mark. S&J, (2).

Slavery and Southern Honor. (n.d.). StudyMode. Education. Retrieved from http://www.studymode.com/essays/Slavery-Southern-Honor-72644.html

Smith, A. (2004). Murder in Jerba: Honour, Shame and  Hospitality among Maltese in Ottoman  Tunisia. History and Anthropology Routledge, 15(2), 107–132.

Stewart,, Y. (n.d.). Mursi: A Study in Honor-Shame dynamics. CATEGORY ARCHIVES: HONOR-SHAME CULTURE. Retrieved from http://www.theaugeanstables.com/category/honor-shame-culture/

TO SHAME OR NOT TO SHAME_ SEXUALITY IN THE MEDITERRANEAN DIASPORA..pdf. (n.d.).

Weir, D. (n.d.). Honour and Shame. Islam Watch. Retrieved from http://www.islam-watch.org/Others/Honour-and-Shame-in-Islam.htm

Women, honor, and context in Mediterranean antiquity.pdf. (n.d.).

Wyatt-Brown, B. & Milbauer, Richard J. (2004). Honor, Shame, and Iraq in American Foreign Policy. In Note prepared for the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University,  New York, November 18-19, 2004. Presented at the Workshop on Humiliation and Violent Conflict, Columbia University,  New York,. Retrieved from http://www.humiliationstudies.org/documents/WyattBrownNY04meeting.pdf

 

 

 

Classroom Discussion and Students Participation

Classroom Discussion and Students Participation: how to Secure Student Engagement to Increase Learning and Improve Teaching

  • How to increase the number of students who take part in classroom discussions
  • How to avoid the problem of dominant talkers
  • How to encourage introverted students to increase their participation in classroom discussions
  • Strategies to help your students recognize what they learned in any discussion
  • How to use the first day of the semester to engage your students—and techniques for getting them to participate right from the start
  • What common classroom practices can decrease the likelihood of a student participating in discussion?
  • What strategies can you use to overcome established classroom practices and increase student participation?
  • And how can you structure classroom discussions to better facilitate student learning?

What does Research Tell Us about Classroom Discussion? Jay Howard
http://digitalcommons.butler.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1163&context=facsch_papers

Do College Students Participate More in Discussion in Traditional Delivery Courses or in Interactive Telecourses?
https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/journal_of_higher_education/v073/73.6howard.html

facts from sociological research:

  • Gender yields mixed results
    • Males participate more frequently than females.
    • Males participate more frequently in courses taught by female instructors
    • Other studies show the opposite
  • Non traditional students participate more frequently
  • Instructors’ gender also returns mixed results
  • Class size as variable is important, smaller classes, more participation
  • Class participation – grading
    • Make the students grade themselves at the end of each class period. By making them grade themselves, they reflect and makes them more aware of their contribution.
      0 – absent
      1 – present but did not verbally participate
      2 – verbally participated one time
      3 – verbally participated more than once
      4 – made an equitable contribution to discussion in terms of both quantity and quality

 

  • The well-known and established belief that smaller classes spur more participation.
    Jay Howard maintain his sociological research in 20th centuries constants: physical classroom, no technology surrounding.
    In the 21st century, clickers changed the opportunity for immediate feedback. They changed also the discourse of the traditional student participation and classroom discussion:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=clickers&submit=Search

Traditional forms and techniques for discussion and participation

Weih, T. G. (2015). Discussion Strategies for the Inclusion of ALL Students. Online Submission,
http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED561060

  • Don’ts:
    call on student
    instructor’s personality issues:

Does the instructor really care of what students have to say
lecturing does not predispose to discussion

  • The 10 second rule: students discuss in pairs the concept/question
  • Think-Pair-Share: discussion strategy before or after lesson, similar to 10 second but longer
  • Quick writes: write their thoughts and then share. Loose paper, names on top,
  • Recorder-reporter. Post-lecture. The person reps the group, who is working on a specific question. Each group different question.
  • K-W-L. what we know, what we want to learn, what we learned. Teacher instructs students that K = what they know, W = what they want to learn and L = what they learned. . work in small groups, but each student works on h/er chart, thus if student disagrees with rest of the group, has record. L is left blank for after the discussion.

Simich-Dudgeon, C., & National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, W. D. (1998). Classroom Strategies for Encouraging Collaborative Discussion. Directions in Language and Education. http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED435188

  • Using storytelling

Chen, W., & Looi, C. (2007). Incorporating Online Discussion in Face to Face Classroom Learning: A New Blended Learning Approach. Australasian Journal Of Educational Technology, 23(3), 307-326.
Discussions and participation in hybrid environment

Jinhong, J., & Gilson, T. A. (2014). Online Threaded Discussion: Benefits, Issues, and Strategies. Kinesiology Review, 3(4), 241-246.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3ds3h%26AN%3d100248254%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

For each OTD topic, the instructor randomly assigns two to four student discussion leaders who are in charge of organizing OTD for the assigned week. Each of the discussion leaders is asked to generate one or two discussion questions related to the topic based on reading assignments. The use of student discussion leaders is a strategy to encourage active participation and help develop ownership of learning. Once student discussion leaders post their questions, other students are encouraged to contribute to the discussion by answering each question, commenting on the ideas of others, or asking questions of peers or the instructor for the next two days. When the week’s discussion is complete, the student leaders and instructor work together to summarize the discussion and evaluate each student’s participation and contribution to the discussion using a scoring rubric. (p.242)

Implementation (p. 243):

  • preparation : On the first day of the course, the instructor introduces topics, how-tos, expectations, grading procedures, and required reading assignments for OTD, and organizes discussion leaders for each online discussion (2–4 leaders for each)
  • Opening and Responding: Posted discussion questions become open at the time of the class and students who are not the leaders are required to post at least one response per question within 48 hrs. During this time, the leaders facilitate discussion by responding to comments, raising questions, or redirecting discussion to encourage active participation and ensure the discussion is on track
  • Summary and Assessment: The job of the leader is to moderate, summarize discussion threads, and assess them at the end of the discussion. When the week’s discussion is complete, the leaders meet with the instructor to debrief and evaluate each student’s participation and contribution to the discussion using a scoring rubric given by the instructor. After the meeting, each leader posts his or her summary of the discussion to BBCMS and reports at the next in-person class.

 

  • D2L
  • Beyond CMS (D2L)

Discussions and participation in online environment

Darabi, A., Liang, X., Suryavanshi, R., & Yurekli, H. (2013). Effectiveness of Online Discussion Strategies: A Meta-Analysis. American Journal Of Distance Education, 27(4), 228-241. doi:10.1080/08923647.2013.837651

  • Beyond CMS (D2L)

Lin, P., Hou, H., Wang, S., & Chang, K. (2013). Analyzing knowledge dimensions and cognitive process of a project-based online discussion instructional activity using Facebook in an adult and continuing education course. Computers & Education, 60(1), 110-121. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2012.07.017
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360131512001819

  1. 111 results suggest that using Facebook is not necessarily harmful to a student’s learning performance. Adequate learning activity design and pedagogical goal setting could, in fact, exploit the social and information-sharing function of Facebook, thereby supporting academic learning (Gray et al., 2010). this study seeks to advance the understanding of adult learners’ behaviors in online project discussions using Facebook.

In the process of project-based learning, learners must utilize different kinds of knowledge (e.g., discrete declarative knowledge and dynamic procedural knowledge) (Lou, 2004). Meanwhile, students can develop higher level of cognitive skills for a specific domain as well as the ability to apply adequate knowledge to a specific domain or context during PBL (Barron et al., 1998; Blumenfeld et al., 1991).

  1. 118
    Select driving questions or controversial issues as project topics: Blumenfeld et al. (1991) noted that driving questions could facilitate students to explore the project topic. In the exploration process, students must first collect information and propose diverse viewpoints on the project topics. They could subsequently filter out and reach consensus during online discussions. This process involves diverse and converging phases that can move students toward higher-order thinking (Jorczak & Bart, 2009).
  2. Allow ample time for online discussion: Results of this study indicated that student online discussions lacked diversity in both knowledge and cognitive process dimensions. One possible reason could be that the allotted time for online discussions was not sufficient. Considering the multiple roles that adult learners play in family and/or work, they may not be able to respond to the discussions in a timely manner. Therefore, allowing more time for students to discuss may provide opportunities for students to demonstrate more diverse and deeper thinking (Scherling, 2011).
  3. Provide a structured rubric for online discussions: Well-designed discussion guidelines and evaluation criteria, i.e., posting protocols or rubric for grading, could serve as scaffolds for student online discussions, which may, subsequently, lead to more meaningful learning (Gilbert & Dabbagh, 2005). Following that, more diverse type of knowledge and levels of cognitive process could be expected to be shown.
  4. Pay attention to the effects that individual differences may exert on the learner’s interactions: Our results showed that, in the context of online discussions, females and older learners are more likely to have off-topic discussions than their male and/or younger counterparts. These findings are in accord with previous research that suggested effects of individual differences on learning as well as on the use of SNSs (Glynn et al., 2012; Muscanell & Guadagno, 2012; Price, 2006; Yukselturk & Bulut, 2009). Therefore, considering the potential effects that gender and age may exert on online discussions, instructors are advised to consider individual differences when grouping students for online discussions, as a balanced group composition of evenly distributed age and gender could be a better approach than a skewed distribution of individuals.

 

social interaction, which was considered as irrelevant discussion, may also leading to meaningful thinking and echoes the viewpoints from previous studies, which suggest social interaction can be a critical element in the CSCL environment (Abedin et al., 2011a, 2011b).

Incorporating online discussion in face to face classroom learning: A new blended learning approach

Wenli Chen, Chee-Kit Looi

Abstract

This paper discusses an innovative blended learning strategy which incorporates online discussion in both in-class face to face, and off-classroom settings. Online discussion in a face to face class is compared with its two counterparts, off-class online discussion as well as in-class, face to face oral discussion, to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed strategy. By integrating online discussion into the flow of the classroom, learners are given dedicated time to foster a habit of critical thinking, reflection and articulating these online, which can subsequently seed further in-class oral discussions, and off-class online discussions. It is found that in-class, online discussion can provide a wider spectrum of discussion perspectives, equalise participation in discussion, and promote cognitive thinking skills and in depth information processing. However, the lack of face to face interactions and the need for sufficient time to do online postings pose challenges in implementing online discussion for face to face classroom learning.

PDF file available

=============

More on classroom discussions in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=discussions&submit=Search

digital literacy for EDAD

one-credit courses on digital literacy offered for the School of Education department for Educational Leadership

====================================================

EDAD 697Introduction to Educational Technology

1 credit, summer 2016

Technology forecast for education: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/27/4710/

Course Description

This synchronous online course will introduce school administrators to the multitude and complexity of educational technology issues. Through group discussions and exercises, the course will focus on the development of knowledge, skills and depositions to effective professional practice in educational leadership. The goal of the course is to develop knowledge and understanding of appropriate application of technology in the teaching and learning process and in the management of educational programs.
Information and experience in the course will include review of the latest trends in technology. Familiarity to acquisition of expertise will be sought in understand and use of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0, as well as social media, multimedia and interactivity and how it affects school life as well as the role of the educational leader. Specific attention will be paid to the importance and ability to develop and maintain policies, which reflect the ever-changing world of technology. Auxiliary, but no less important issues such as legal issues, copyright issues, ethics and other forms of digital citizenship will be discussed.

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course the student will:

Course Objective Knowledge Skill Disposition Impact
1.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of related technologies appropriate to the management of a school # o o
2.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of related technologies appropriate to the instructional program of a school # o o
3.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of various types of related technologies for supporting the instructional program of the school # o o
4.      Demonstrate knowledge of planning and management procedures and policies for the appropriate use of technological resources to serve the mission of the school # o o
5.      Demonstrate knowledge of common computer and related technological applications # o o
6.      Identify gender & diversity issues related to technology in education o o o
7.      Demonstrate knowledge of adaptive technology devices for individuals with special needs o o o o
8.      Demonstrate skill in the use of technology for materials preparation, presentations, record keeping, computation, communication, information / data collection and management, and the effective use of the Internet o o o
9.      Demonstrate an understanding of legal issues, including copyright issues, related to educational technology o o
10.  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of ethical practice in the use of technology o o
11.  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of administrative policies and procedures that promote appropriate utilization of technology by school personnel o o o
12.  Demonstrate familiarity with appropriate professional standards related to educational leadership and technology o o o o
13.  Demonstrate an understanding of the digital age learning culture, digital citizenship in particular o o

 

# http://ed.mnsu.edu/edleadership/docs/license_competencies/K-12_Principal_Competencies_revised_8_22_08.pdf

National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators.

http://www.iste.org/standards/ISTE-standards/standards-for-administrators

Demonstrate familiarity with appropriate professional standards related to educational leadership and technology
http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2015/ProfessionalStandardsforEducationalLeaders2015forNPBEAFINAL.pdf

Resources On Line

IMS Technology blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: #edtech ; #edtechchat ; #edtechUK; @Edtech_K12

Facebook: #edtech ;  #edleadership

Pinterest #edtech; #edleadership ; #edtechleadership

Agency for Instructional Technology             http://www.ait.net

Center for Technology and Teacher Education            http://www.teacherlink.org

Center for Children and Technology            http://www.edc.org/CCT/

T.H.E. Journal (Technology Horizons in Education Online Journal)            http://www.thejournal.com

Cybertimes Navigator (New York Times) http://www.nytimes.com/navigator

International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)            http://cnets.iste.org/

Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA)   http://cnets.iste.org/tssa

ISTE curriculum and Content Area Standards   http://Cnets.iste.org/currstands/

Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to use Technology (PT3)              http://www.pt3.org

Assistive Technology information:  http://www.abilityhub.com  http://www.enablemart.com

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

EDAD ??? Technology and Curriculum Design

1 credit, Summer 2016

Course Description

This course seeks hands-on experience in integration of educational technology into the classroom. Students will learn to select opportunities for application [or not] of technology in education. The course will provide a hands-on experience for educational leaders to understand the application of technology in the curriculum process. Topics of consideration include instructional design, media and formats, devices, telecommunications and social interactivity. The course will provide an opportunity to apply technology knowledge and experience in hands-on exercises for curriculum management as well as monitoring student achievement progress. Further discussions and practical approach will include modern, effective and efficient ways of communications among parents, students, faculty and administration. The course offered in synchronous online mode and F2F mode.

Objectives/Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course the student will:

  1. Understand the impact of technology on the teaching and learning process.
  2. Understand the principles of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and National Educational Standards for Students (NETS*S) and their application in the curriculum process.
  3. Research and assess the opportunities for technology to be integrated in the classroom.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl

The ISTE National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•T) and

Performance Indicators for Teachers

https://www.kent.edu/sites/default/files/file/ISTEstandards.pdf

 

EDAD ??? Technology as an Integral Part of Successful Educational Leadership

1 credit, Summer 2016

Course Description

Course Description

This class will support teacher leaders and school administrators in reviewing and systematizing the fast aspects of modern electronic technologies. Based on a foundational better understanding of how technologies work, future educational leaders will develop skills and practice the application of ideas, tactics and methods for better integration of technologies in the teaching and learning process as well as the creation of better policies and procedures.

The course is designed to bring research and analytical skills and build structure in the process of resolving technology issues, which educational leaders face in modern schools, including hardware and software problems, networks and computers, curriculum and teaching and learning methods.

The course will offer discussions as well as practical solutions such as social media (e.g. Twitter) for professional development, online tools for teacher evaluation, online tools for collaboration and creativity, immediate and future trends, which already impact education and educational leadership.
The course offered in synchronous online mode and F2F mode.

Objectives/Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to identify and update sources for information to keep current their technology knowledge
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of technology leadership standards.
  3. Student will demonstrate an understanding of how to create, promote, and sustain a dynamic, digital – age learning culture that provides a rigorous, relevant, and engaging education for all students.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding of how to promote an environment of professional learning and innovation that empowers educators to enhance student learning through the infusion of contemporary technologies and digital resources.
  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how to provide digital – age leadership and management to continuously improve the organization through the effective use of information and technology resources.
  6. Students will understand and apply knowledge of how to model and facilitate understanding of social, ethical and legal issues and responsibilities related to an evolving digital culture.
  7. Students will demonstrate knowledge of technology as integral part of facilities and resource management
  8. Students will be able to describe and use budget planning and management procedures related to educational computing and technology.
  9. Students will be able to describe and maintain current information involving facilities planning issues related to computers and related technologies.
  10. Students will be able to design and develop policies and procedures concerning staffing, scheduling, and security for managing computers/technology in a variety of instructional and administrative school

video tools for social media

14 Video Tools for Social Media

use to create screencasts, montages and slideshows.

December 7, 2015

http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/14-video-tools-for-social-media-marketers

Facebook gives priority to native videos (as opposed to video links to external sources) to encourage this type of content. Videos that are directly uploaded to Facebook perform better and provide a better experience. They receive 30% more video views than videos posted from other websites, and have images up to 11 times larger in the news feed.

Screencasts / Lecture Capture

  • Camtasia Studio
  • ScreenFlow (Apple/Mac)
  • Snagit
  • TechSmith Fuse works with Camtasia Studio and Snagit. Capture the images and videos on your mobile device and send them to your desktop to use in your videos.
  • Reflector by Squirrels allows you to do wireless mirroring, so you can display your smartphone screen (Android or iOS) on your desktop.

Slideshows

Video Montages on Desktop and Mobile Apps

  • Animoto
  • Magisto is a free app that automatically turns your everyday videos and photos into movies
  • Adobe Voice. The app is available only for iPad

Mobile video capture

  • Flipagram. You can record voice narration, choose from Flipagram’s music or upload 15 seconds of music you already have on your mobile device.
  • Diptic app is another video tool for making collages that has a newly added animation feature, which works with transitions
  • Boomerang is a new app from Instagram that takes a burst of photographs and stitches them together into a 1-second video and loops it forward and backward. It’s not an animated GIF, but it’s designed to look like one.

More about lecture capture in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=capture&submit=Search
More about video in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=video&submit=Search
More about effective presentations and slideshows in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=presentations&submit=Search

 

 

 

 

digital literacy for SOE students

Digital literacy for SOE students

Class ED 610 Introduction to Curriculum and Instruction Summer 2018

Instructor:     Hsuehi(Martin) Lo

short link to this session: http://bit.ly/edad829

for online participation, please use the following Zoom or Adobe Connect session (your instructor will direct you which one:

  1. For Zoom, please use the following URL to login:
    https://zoom.us/j/4684903124

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be leading your digital literacy instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Here is a preliminary plan. We will not follow it strictly; it is just an idea about the topics we would like to cover. Shall there be points of interest, please feel free to contribute prior and during the session.

Keeping in mind the ED 610 Learning Goals and Objectives, namely:

  1. Understand and demonstrate how to write literature review in the field of the C&I research
  2. Understand the related research methods in both quantitative and qualitative perspectives from the explored research articles
  3. Understand how to use searching engine to find meaningful articles
  4. Interpret and do critical thinking in C&I research articles

lets review our search and research skills:

  1. How do we search?
    1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
    3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
  2. Custom Search Engine:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
  3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

+++++++++++++
PICO framework to structure a question:
Population, Patient, Problem
Intervention
Comparison
Outcome

prepare systematic review

  1. Subject Guides
    Please locate theEducation (Elementary)
    Education (Secondary)
    Educational Administration and Leadership (Doctoral)
    Educational Administration and Leadership (Masters)
    at the LRS web page:
    http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/default.asp
    library research guide
    Look for “Research Assistance” and scroll to
    Educational Administration and Leadership or any of the four links related to education
    http://research.stcloudstate.edu/rqs.phtml?subject_id=122
  2. Electronic Journals & the DOI System

    What is a DOI? A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is assigned to electronic journal articles (and selected other online content) to specifically and permanently identify and access that article. Most of the standard academic citation formats now require the inclusion of DOIs within a citation when available.

    How to find a DOI:   Most current academic journal articles include a DOI (usually listed on the first page of the article).  Most library databases list a DOI with the record for recent academic journal articles.  Most non-academic articles (including magazine and newspaper articles) as well as many older academic journal articles do not have a DOI.  Crossref.org provides a DOI Lookup service that will search for a DOI based on citation information (author’s last name, journal name, article title, etc.).

    How to access an article via a DOI: Use the CSU Stanislaus Library DOI Look-up for options provided by the library, including access to the full-text via the publisher’s site or a library database service when available. Other, general DOI look-up systems (CrossRef & DOI.org) usually link to the article’s “homepage” on the publisher’s site (which usually include a free abstract but full-text access is restricted to subscribers).

  3. What is ORCID: http://orcid.org/register

shall more info be needed and or “proper” session with a reference librarian be requested. http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=EDAD-D

-Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)

Filters

filters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

+++++++++++++++++
Search criteria

search_criteria

 

 

 

 

++++++++++++++++

  1. Books and Video
  2. Articles and databases
  3. Journal Title and Citation Finder
  4. Reference and Facts
  5. Institutional Repository
SCSU library web page snapshot with link to repository

SCSU library web page snapshot with link to repository

  1. Simple versus Advanced Search
  2. Interlibrary Loan ILL http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/services/illrequest.asp
  3. Ways to find research specific to doctoral student needs (ie: Ways to find dissertations, peer reviewed research sources, research-related information, etc.)
  4. Understand the responsibilities of authorship including copyright, intellectual property, and discipline-based expectations
  5. Basic Research Resources-Jan 2015 version edit pmConcept mapping:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=concept+map
  6. Explore and select citation management software to organize bibliographic information
  7. Refworks: https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
  8. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
    1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
    2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
  1. -Setting up social networking to gather articles and other research information
    slide 9 of the PPT Basic Research Resources

Social media and its importance for the topic research and the dissertation research:

Small business owners use social media primarily as a marketing and search engine optimization tool. However, more and more small businesses are using social media to get answers for business related questions. Specific industry related articles, and statistics are found useful for small business owners in 80% of the cases.
https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140331225132-25026422-small-business-owners-turning-to-social-media

Altmetricshttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/23/altmetrics-library-lily-troia/

  1. Collaborative Tools
  2. Apps Anywhere (need installation of Citrix Receiver):

 

  1. File/Web space: https://webfs.stcloudstate.edu/main/default.aspx
  2. Dropbox:  https://www.dropbox.com/
  3. Web 2.0 tools: e.g. Diigo.com; Evernote.com
  4. Facebook, Twitter
  5. Blog.stcloudstate.edu

Other sources for information:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/27/research-how-to/

Academic.com and ResearchGate

  1. -Saving articles, saving quotes and other article information

Blogs – use tags

hands-on exercise:

learn how to use Zotero and/or Refworks in Microsoft Word

dissertation zotero
and/or
Refworks and/or Mendeley in Google Docs RefWorks ProQuest

 

 

Google Doc ProQuest RefWorks

 

Login into ProQuest Refworks AddOn for Google Doc:

login refworks google doc-y80ulf

Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks
Evernote, Diigo

If Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, use hashtags

  1. Share any other research-related resources available through the library or other sources

—————-
Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
pedagogues under a minute: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/178173728981990450/

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