Searching for "social learning"

Social Learning and Gamification

Beyond The Buzz Phrase: Social Learning And LMS Gamification In Real Life

When: Thursday 26 July 2018, 11:00 PM – 12:00 PM

Adobe’s Senior Learning Evangelist, Katrina Marie Baker in our webinar, and find out how you can easily transform your learning by taking a deep dive into the 2 smartest learning breakthroughs of the decade: Social Learning & Gamification 🚀

During this session, you will:

• Learn how to blend social learning into existing courses using an LMS
• Discover how gamification can be aligned with your business objectives
• Come upon the latest learning tech tips to help you drive engagement
• See examples of how gamification and social learning can be both employed in Captivate Prime LMS

Are social learning and gamification the new fashion that will dominate the future of eLearning? Let’s find out together!

Save your spot here now http://ow.ly/EqYP30kV0qQ

++++++++++++++
more on social learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+learning

social presence in online learning

We invite you to an upcoming session in the 2017-18 CIDER Sessions series on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. This free, online session will feature David Mykota from the University of Saskatchewan.
 Title: Social Presence in Online Learning: A Scoping Study
This presentation reports the findings of a scoping review of the construct social presence. The methodology follows the design for scoping reviews as advocated by Arksey and O’Malley (2005).

A scoping study is desirable because by synthesizing the research literature the opportunity to identify practical guidelines for the development of social presence is facilitated. A two-stage screening process resulted in 105 studies identified for inclusion with data extracted using a standardized form. A descriptive numerical analysis and qualitative content analysis for those studies included was undertaken. Results from the manuscripts, screened for inclusion and synthesized from the data extracted in the scoping review, provide strategies for the structuring of social presence; the potential benefits of effective affective communication in an online environ; and an overview of the evolution of the construct social presence. Future research that links both the theoretical and empirical frameworks that validate social presence across a variety of online and e-learning environs is recommended so that best practices for excellence in higher education can continue to be made possible.

When: Wednesday, May 2, 2018 – 11am to 12noon Mountain Time (Canada)

Where: Online through Adobe Connect at:
https://athabascau.adobeconnect.com/cider

Registration is not required; all are welcome. CIDER Sessions are recorded and archived for later viewing through the CIDER website. For more information on CIDER and our Sessions, please visit us at:
http://cider.athabascau.ca

Pre-configuration:
Please note that it is important to set up your system prior to the event. Make sure your Mac or PC is equipped with a microphone and speakers, so that you can use the audio functionality built into the conferencing software. The Adobe Connect platform may require an update to your Flash Player; allow time for this update by joining the session 10 minutes prior to the scheduled presentation.

*********************

CIDER sessions are brought to you by the International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning (IRRODL) and the Centre for Distance Education, Athabasca University: Canada’s Open University and leader in professional online education. The Sessions and their recordings are open and available to all, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Our mailing address is:

Athabasca University

International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning (IRRODL)
1200, 10011 – 109 Street

Edmonton, AB T5J 3S8

Canada

Add us to your address book

++++++++++++++++++++++++
more on distance ed theories in this IMS blog:
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/26/distance-education-theories/

social media elearning

Mnkandla, Ernest, and Ansie Minnaar. 2017. “The Use of Social Media in E-Learning: A Metasynthesis.” The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning 18 (5). http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/3014.
This research represents a conceptual framework designed to explain the adoption of social media into e-learning by using online collaborative learning (OCL) in higher education. Social media in e-learning signals the end of distance education in higher education.
The proposed framework could be useful to instructional designers and academics who are interested in using modern learning theories and want to adopt social media in e-learning in higher education as a deep learning strategy.
The major paradigms underlying the theoretical frameworks that were investigated were included in social learning theory, social interactivity theory, constructionism and social constructivism, and online collaborative learning theory (Harasim, 2012). Collaboration and social constructivism were the main theoretical frameworks guiding the use of social media in e-learning in higher education that point towards a more integrative (collaborative) and co-constructivism peer supportive approach to learning in the digital age.
+++++++++++++++++++++
more on social media in IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

social media collaborative learning

Zhang, X., Chen, H., Pablos, P. O. de, Lytras, M. D., & Sun, Y. (2016). Coordinated Implicitly? An Empirical Study on the Role of Social Media in Collaborative Learning. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(6). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i6.2622
PDF file available here: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/2622/4000
++++++++++++++++++
Vlachopoulos, D. (2016). Assuring Quality in E-Learning Course Design: The Roadmap. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(6). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i6.2784
PDF file available here: http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/2784/3952

++++++++++++++++++

Ungerer, L. M. (2016). Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(5). https://doi.org/10.19173/irrodl.v17i5.2566
 metaliteracy
Technology considerably impacts on current literacy requirements (Reinking, as cited in Sharma & Deschaine, 2016). Being literate in the 21st century requires being able to decode and comprehend multimodal texts and digital format and also engage with these texts in a purposeful manner. Literacy is not merely based on a specific skill, but consists of a process that embraces the dynamic, social, and collaborative facets of digital technology (Lewis & Fabos, as cited in Mills, 2013).
Mackey and Jacobson (2011) suggest reframing the concept of information literacy as metaliteracy (supporting multiple literacy types) because of a tremendous growth in social media and collaborative online communities. They propose that information literacy currently involves more than a set of discrete skills, since active knowledge production and distribution in collaborative online communities are also necessary.
 Mackey and Jacobson (2011) position metaliteracy as an overarching and comprehensive framework that informs other literacy types. It serves as the basis for media literacy, digital literacy, ICT literacy, and visual literacy.
According to Mills (2013, p. 47), digital curation is the sifting and aggregation of internet and other digital resources into a manageable collection of what teachers and students find relevant, personalized and dynamic. It incorporates the vibrancy of components of the Internet and provides a repository that is easily accessible and usable.
 digital-curation

Pedagogies of Abundance

According to Weller (2011), a pedagogy of abundance should consider a number of assumptions such as that content often is freely available and abundant. Content further takes on various forms and it is often easy and inexpensive to share information. Content is socially based and since people filter and share content, a social approach to learning is advisable. Further, establishing and preserving connections in a network is easy and they do not have to be maintained on a one-to-one basis. Successful informal groupings occur frequently, reducing the need to formally manage groups.

Resource-based learning. Ryan (as cited in Weller, 2011) defines resource-based learning as “an integrated set of strategies to promote student centred learning in a mass education context, through a combination of specially designed learning resources and interactive media and technologies.”

Problem-based learning. Problem-based learning takes place when learners experience the process of working toward resolving a problem encountered early in the learning process (Barrows & Tamblyn, as cited in Weller, 2011). Students often collaborate in small groups to identify solutions to ill-defined problems, while the teacher acts as facilitator and assists groups if they need help. Problem-based learning meets a number of important requirements such as being learner-directed, using diverse resources and taking an open-ended approach.

Communities of practice. Lave and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) concept of situated learning and Wenger’s (as cited in Weller, 2011) idea of communities of practice highlight the importance of apprenticeship and the social role in learning.

My note: this article spells out what needs to be done and how. it is just flabeghasting that research guides are employed so religiously by librarians. They are exactly the opposite concept of the one presented in this article: they are closed, controlled by one or several librarians, without a constant and easy access of the instructor, not to mention the students’ participation

+++++++++++++++++
more on teaching w social media in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+teaching

Save

Save

Technology Week: Social Media in Teaching and Learning

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/04/social-media-explained/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/17/connectivism-and-traditional-learning-theories/
Top 10 Social Media Management Tools: beyond Hootsuite and TweetDeck

Social and Emotional Learning Core Competencies

http://www.casel.org/social-and-emotional-learning/core-competencies

  • Self-awareness: The ability to accurately recognize one’s emotions and thoughts and their influence on behavior. This includes accurately assessing one’s strengths and limitations and possessing a well-grounded sense of confidence and optimism.
  • Self-management: The ability to regulate one’s emotions, thoughts, and behaviors effectively in different situations. This includes managing stress, controlling impulses, motivating oneself, and setting and working toward achieving personal and academic goals.
  • Social awareness: The ability to take the perspective of and empathize with others from diverse backgrounds and cultures, to understand social and ethical norms for behavior, and to recognize family, school, and community resources and supports.
  • Relationship skills: The ability to establish and maintain healthy and rewarding relationships with diverse individuals and groups. This includes communicating clearly, listening actively, cooperating, resisting inappropriate social pressure, negotiating conflict constructively, and seeking and offering help when needed.
  • Responsible decision making: The ability to make constructive and respectful choices about personal behavior and social interactions based on consideration of ethical standards, safety concerns, social norms, the realistic evaluation of consequences of various actions, and the well-being of self and others.

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL LEARNING: How to Trust Your Students

How to Trust Your Students (from Edutopia)

  • Give it away: Trust must be given in order for trust to develop.
  • Slowly and deliberately get to know your student
  • Share power: Seek student input about what is to be learned and how.
  • Explain to students how they can earn your trust
  • Avoid protective hesitancy: Engage students who don’t look, sound and act like you.
  • Try not to punish
  • Adjust the learning environment

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/how-to-trust-your-students-todd-finley?utm_source=SilverpopMailing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=091813%20enews%20(actives%206-9am%2030%%20AB%2040K%20throttle)%20remainder&utm_content=&spMailingID=6990931&spUserID=MjcyOTI0NDQxNzgS1&spJobID=89056404&spReportId=ODkwNTY0MDQS1

Social Media for Learning: Feb 19, 2PM MC 205 discussion

social media on mobile devices (Twitter and Facebook) to accommodate and enhance learning – and audio and video applications to enhance your presentations and projects.

–          What is social media

–          What are mobile devices

–          Why social media on mobile devices?

–          How they intersect in learning and teaching

Hands-on

–          Describe your mobile device and determine its OS
what is OS and what kinds there are. Why is it important

–          What social media applications are you familiar with

http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/hr2012.pdf

http://vergepipemedia.com/blog/using-social-media-for-higher-education/

http://www.academia.edu/1220569/Social_Media_in_Higher_Education_A_Literature_Review_and_Research_Directions

http://ctlt.jhsph.edu/blog/post.cfm/social-media-in-higher-education-mobile-devices

SAMR personalized learning

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-18-what-the-samr-model-may-be-missing

Developed by Dr. Ruben Puentedura, the SAMR Model aims to guide teachers in integrating technology into their classrooms. It consists of four steps: Substitution (S), Augmentation (A), Modification (M), and Redefinition (R).

The SAMR Model

The problem with many personalized learning tools is that they live mostly in realm of Substitution or Augmentation tasks. 

It’s in moments like these that we see the SAMR model, while laying an excellent foundation, isn’t enough. When considering which technologies to incorporate into my teaching, I like to consider four key questions, each of which build upon strong foundation that SAMR provides.

1. Does the technology help to minimize complexity?

2. Does the technology help to maximize the individual power and potential of all learners in the room?

use Popplet and iCardSort regularly in my classroom—flexible tools that allow my students to demonstrate their thinking through concept mapping and sorting words and ideas.

3. Will the technology help us to do something previously unimaginable?

4. Will the technology preserve or enhance human connection in the classroom?

Social media is a modern-day breakthrough in human connection and communication. While there are clear consequences to social media culture, there are clear upsides as well. Seesaw, a platform for student-driven digital portfolios, is an excellent example of a tool that enhances human connection.

++++++++++++++++++++++
more on SAMR and TRACK models in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/17/transform-education-digital-tools/

more on personalized learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=personalized+learning

gamification online learning

Gunawan, F. (2018). GAMIFICATION ANALYSIS AND IMPLEMENTATION IN ONLINE LEARNING. ICIC Express Letters, 12(12), 1195–1204.
https://www.academia.edu/39858461/GAMIFICATION_ANALYSIS_AND_IMPLEMENTATION_IN_ONLINE_LEARNING?auto=download
Khan [14] has introduced the eight-dimensional elearning framework, a detailed self assessment instrument for institutions to evaluate the readiness and the opportunity of their e-learning classes to grow.
institutional, management, technological, pedagogical, ethical, interface design, resource support, and evaluation. Institutional refers to the administrative and academic part of the system. Management refers to the quality control, budget, and scheduling. Technological refers to the infrastructure, hardware, and software. Pedagogical refers to analysis, organization and learning strategies. Ethical refers to ethical, legal, and social and political influences. Interface design refers to the user interface, accessibility, and design content. Resource support refers to career services, journals, and online forums. Finally, the evaluation refers to the assessment of learners and educators.
gamification – definition
Modern gamification term was first introduced by
Nick Pelling in 2002 [15]. Gamification is a concept that implements the game components
into the non-game contents such as education, marketing, administration, or even software
engineering [16]. These components include points, badges, leaderboards, and quests.
Each of them serves the purpose to increase the level of user engagement in the learning
process.
three components of engagement: cognitive, behavioral, and emotional [19].
+++++++++++++
more on gamification and online learning in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification+online+learning

1 2 3 27