Archive of ‘digital divide’ category

tech for faculty top priority?

per M Pacansky-Brock tweet:
81% of IT officials say faculty development for use of tech in teaching is top priority

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2014/10/01/survey-shows-training-and-support-remain-top-issues-among-it-officials

college and universities are unable to offer the right training to faculty, staff and students. IT officials’ evaluations of their own institutions’ IT infrastructure present almost a mirror image of their list of priorities. While 81.4 percent of respondents listed faculty development as their top priority, only 27.9 percent rated their existing training offerings as excellent (or a seven on a seven-point scale). At 12.8 percent, IT training for students drew the second-lowest share of respondents giving it an excellent rating.

The Four Stages of Moving from Traditional to Online Teaching

The Four Stages of Moving from Traditional to Online Teaching

http://www.getfueled.com/blog/2014-09-09/four-stages-moving-traditional-online-teaching#sthash.7FSmEhEv.dpuf

1.      Sage on the Stage:

In this stage the teacher takes on traditional lecture-style teaching and hasn’t yet implemented any online or blended learning strategies.

2.      Stranger in a Strange Land:

Next, the teacher becomes a Stranger in a Strange Land, as instruction moves to the computer, and the computer becomes the primary instructional tool. At this stage, the teacher is still unsure of how they fit in but is experimenting with and utilizing online tools to enhance instruction.

3.      Resource:

As the teacher continues to evolve, they enter the Resource stage, and while the computer is still the primary instructional tool, the teacher is comfortable being a resource, answering questions and re-teaching when asked.

4.      Facilitator and Initiator of Interventions:

Do Digital Natives Really Exist?

Do Digital Natives Really Exist?

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/12/do-digital-natives-really-exist/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+kqed%2FnHAK+%28MindShift%29

it’s an accurate depiction of the current generation of students? No one is born with knowledge. Everything is learned through environment and practice, so maybe it’s time to reexamine long held assumptions about students’ relationships to technology.

Is it appropriate for schools to require that parents buy expensive electronics as school supplies?

Is it appropriate for schools to require that parents buy expensive electronics as school supplies? #edtech #edchat http://ow.ly/qtZUy

Around 100 students wait for the library to open before the start of classes each day so that they can get on a computer, he said, and Framingham High is purchasing 400 inexpensive Chromebook laptop computers this year to help give kids more access to technology.

Some school districts have “bring-your-own-device” programs, which encourage students to bring tablets, laptops, or smartphones to school. In those programs, students are typically allowed to work on whatever device they happen to have.

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