Searching for "history"

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

Math, Science, History: Games Break Boundaries Between Subjects

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/05/math-science-history-games-break-boundaries-between-subjects-interdisciplinary-learning/

possibilities for a formal Renaissance-Man-Liberal-Arts education remain limited to the elite. The average, or common, student is encouraged to choose majors and institutions that track into a specialized vocation.

MincraftEDU and SimCityEDU provide flexible options for integrating familiar games with traditional classroom curriculum.

The ability to apply knowledge across disciplines is important, but it is not enough. It is important to combine that knowledge with strong social and emotional skills that serve as the foundation for good citizenship in the 21st Century.

The MindShift Guide to Games and Learning

more on gaming in this blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=gaming

history of the Internet from Web 1.0 to Web 3.0

What is Web 1.0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXFYkbQRgY4

What is Web 2.0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bc0oDIEbYFc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0QJmmdw3b0

What is Web 3.0

http://webtrends.about.com/od/web20/a/what-is-web-30.htm
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2102852,00.asp
http://www.w3.org/standards/semanticweb/
http://www.1stwebdesigner.com/design/web-3-introduction/

 

rethinking gamification

Ruffino, P., & Fizek, S. (n.d.). Rethinking Gamification. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/7544496/Rethinking_Gamification

+++++++++++++
more on gamification in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=gamification

Gamification can be approached in at least two ways. First, as a general process in which games and playful experiences are understood as essential components of society and culture.

Sebastian Deterding, Rilla
Khaled, Lennart Nacke and Dan Dixon have proposed a tentative history of
the term: “ ‘gamification’ as a term originated in the digital media industry.
The first documented use dates back to 2008, but gamification only entered
widespread adoption in the second half of 2010”

Jane McGonigal’s work, expounded in her contribution at the TED
Talk series in 2010, is also concerned with “selling” gamification to corporations.
In her book Reality is Broken. p.9  In her understanding, gamification is a concept that describes a new age where gamers can collectively use their problem-solving skills not only
to solve puzzles within a digital game but also to approach social and political
issues in the real world. Gaming, according to McGonigal’s vision,
could and should play a redeeming role. Game designers could become the
new social entrepreneurs, and citizens become gamers. From this perspective,
gamification thus becomes a technique for enabling greatly ambitious
change.

p. 10 Consumer loyalty, issues related to finance and governance, workers’ productivity, training and development – these are only some of the areas that are allegedly being positively revolu tionised by the emergence of gamification

As outlined by Ian Bogost in several contexts (2011a, 2011b), gamificatio has little to do with the design of games (or an allegedly salvific process), and much more with the exploitation of consumers. It frustrates the practice of game design and reduces playing to a stimulus-response experience

p. 11 Niklas Schrape proposes looking, through Foucault, at how gamification might work as a method to regulate individuals and their social lives. It also works as a pleasant regulator of behaviour because it offers positive feedback (rewards, leaderboards, etc.) rather than
negative penalties (fines, prison, etc.).

Ruffino looks at the work of Tim Ingold and his reading of Bergson and Heidegger and argues that participation, dwelling and co-existence could be seen as alternative ways of thinking about engagement: less as a transitive process that goes from games to their players and more as an in transitive status that needs to be narrated in order to be of any value

Foursquare alters the experience of moving about on the streets of a city and establishes a form of communication based on bodily proximity

p. 12 Joost Raessens examines how gamification could be seen in the context of a more general “ludic turn”, which affects society and culture at many different levels. This century, Raessens notes, has seen several different kinds of “turns”: We have seen the linguistic turn, the digital, followed by the material one and many others. To what extent could we say that we are now experiencing a playful turnp.

p. 14 the definition of gamification as the use of game elements in a non-game context.
Philippette suggests the very idea that games that can influencethe non-game context could be re-interpreted following Henriot’s theories on play (https://www.academia.edu/16293099/Gamification_Rethinking_playing_the_game_with_Jacques_Henriot

Counter-gamification is not a precise practice; it is not defined in guidebooks, workshops, or tutorials. It is instead a form of appropriation of playful elements by artists in order to promote radical and oppositional values.

p. 15 Fizek’s proposal is to expand the concept of play and fun and to introduce new forms of engagement in the practice of gamification

If the endgame approach were applied to gamification, Nicholson argues, we could see very different ways of designing and playing. The author explores these alternative modes of gamifying things through a text that offers both a theoretical understanding of gamification and exceptionally useful suggestions for designers.

p. 16 an eudaimonic view of gamification could bring a “good” way of living and
playing, one where joy and satisfaction are at the centre of a responsible practice. Gamification, according to Deterding, could become the name of a play practice that truly helps human beings in fulfilling their own lives and those of others

++++++++++++++
More on Bogost in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=bogost

VR Antarctica

Kate Pound, a professor with St. Cloud State U did research in Antarctica: kspound@stcloudstate.edu 

 

View this post on Instagram

 

Experience Sir Ed’s Antarctica…through virtual reality! Antarctic Heritage Trust is honoured to care for Sir Edmund Hillary’s Antarctic legacy. Over the 2016–2017 summer Antarctic Heritage Trust’s team on the Ice spent more than 5700 hours carefully restoring Hillary’s (TAE/IGY) Hut and conserving more than 500 artefacts. And now, as part of celebrating Sir Ed’s centenary, the Trust has partnered with Auckland University of Technology (AUT) to create a virtual reality experience based around the expedition base. The Trust is delighted to be giving people a glimpse into what life was like for Hillary and the men of his expedition on the ice. This fully immersive experience will be the closest thing possible to exploring the expedition’s base without actually going to the hut itself. The experience will be free and available at a range of locations across New Zealand as well as online. It is a ground-breaking project in terms of its scale and approach. Professor Barbara Bollard from AUT, who helped collect the data to build the virtual reality, says: “The experience is unique in that it allows you to experience special places without leaving a footprint. It opens up a long and rich history of Antarctic exploration to a wide audience who may never have the opportunity to visit in person.” Enjoy this brief teaser that showcases some of the graphic ‘look and feel’ of the experience, and look out for details to come on how you can experience Hillary’s Hut in virtual reality yourself. With thanks to project partner AUT, principal sponsor Ryman Healthcare Ltd, Antarctica New Zealand (logistics) and Staples VR (technical). #edmundhillary #antarctica #antarctic #antarcticadventure #expedition #conservation #antarcticlegacy #kiwilegend #scottbase #rossisland #explore #discover #southpole #virtualreality #virtualrealitytour #restoration #duluxpaint @staples_vr @antarctica.nz @duluxnz @autuni @rymancareers

A post shared by Antarctic Heritage (@antarcticheritage) on

+++++++++++++++
more on VR in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=vr+virtual+reality

Iris Murdoch on Storytelling

Iris Murdoch on Storytelling, Why Art Is Essential for Democracy, and the Key to Good Writing

“A good society contains many different artists doing many different things. A bad society coerces artists because it knows that they can reveal all kinds of truths.”

“Storytelling is a tool for knowing who we are and what we want.” Ursula K. Le Guin

philosopher and novelist Iris Murdoch (July 15, 1919–February 8, 1999) — one of the most lucid and luminous minds of the twentieth century — explored in a long, deep, immensely insightful 1977 conversation with the British broadcaster and philosopher Bryan McGee, which aired on McGee’s television series Men of Ideas.

Existentialists and Mystics: Writings on Philosophy and Literature (public library).

the fundamental difference between the function of philosophy and that of art — one being to clarify and concretize, the other to mystify and expand.

A century after Nietzsche examined the power of language to both conceal and reveal truth, and several years before Oliver Sacks’s trailblazing insight into narrative as the pillar of identity, Murdoch considers how we, as storytelling creatures, use language in the parallel arts of literature and living

Hemingway’s admonition against the dangers of ego in creative work. distinguish a recognisable style from a personal presence. 

bridging William James’s landmark assertion that “a purely disembodied human emotion is a nonentity” and Tolstoy’s insistence that “emotional infectiousness” is what separates good art from the bad

There is always more bad art around than good art, and more people like bad art than like good art.

James Baldwin wielded the double-edged sword of the artist’s duty to society, Murdoch insists on this largeness: The artist’s duty is to art, to truth-telling in his own medium, the writer’s duty is to produce the best literary work of which he is capable, and he must find out how this can be done.

In consonance with John F. Kennedy’s exhortation to a propaganda-smothered society — “We must never forget that art is not a form of propaganda; it is a form of truth.”
(My note: Lenin – Art is always political. He did not distinguish art and propaganda. http://soviethistory.msu.edu/1924-2/socialist-cinema/socialist-cinema-texts/lenin-on-the-most-important-of-the-arts/)

after the teenage Sylvia Plath precociously observed that “once a poem is made available to the public, the right of interpretation belongs to the reader,”Murdoch examines the laboratory for reflection and interpretation
My note: on Sylvia Plath, see Elif Shafak’s Black Milk: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9923549-black-milk

Susan Sontag’s beautiful wisdom on storytelling and what it means to be a moral human being, Murdoch weighs the relationship between morality and truth, as mediated by language

Rebecca West on storytelling as a survival mechanism,

+++++++++++++
more on storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=storytelling

social media and students

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-16-here-s-what-happened-when-students-solved-social-media-problems-with-design-thinking

“Social: The New Media.” So I got to work, curating a playlist of videos on topics I wanted them to explore—such as the well-publicised problems with social media platforms and false news

the Stanford History Education Group (SHEG), Google’s Applied Digital Skills and the archives of The Sift from the News Literacy Project.

certification with Future Design School, and equipped with their curriculum app,

+++++++++++++
more on social media and education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=social+media+education

more on fake news in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=FAKE+NEWS

ARLD 2019

ARLD 2019

Paul Goodman

Technology is a branch of moral philosophy, not of science

The process of making technology is design

Design is a branch of moral philosophy, not of a science

 

System design reflects the designer’s values and the cultural content

Andreas Orphanides

 

Fulbright BOYD

 

Byzantine history professor Bulgarian – all that is 200 years old is politics, not history

 

Access, privacy, equity, values for the prof organization ARLD.

 

Mike Monteiro

This is how bad design makes it out into the world, not due to mailcioius intent, but whith nbo intent at all

 

Cody Hanson

Our expertise, our service ethic, and our values remain our greatest strengths. But for us to have the impat we seek into the lives of our users, we must encode our services and our values in to the software

Ethical design.

Design interprets the world to crate useful objects. Ethical design closes the loop, imaging how those object will affect the world.

 

A good science fiction story should be able to predict not the automobile, ut the traffics jam. Frederic Pohl

Victor Papanek The designer’s social and moral judgement must be brought into play long before she begins to design.

 

We need to fear the consequences of our work more than we love the cleverness of our ideas Mike Monteiro

Analytics

Qual and quan data – lirarainas love data, usage, ILL, course reserves, data –  QQLM.

IDEO – the goal of design research isn’t to collect data, I tis to synthesize information and provide insight and guidance that leads to action.

Google Analytics: the trade off. besides privacy concners. sometimes data and analytics is the only thing we can see.

Frank CHimero – remove a person;s humanity and she is just a curiosity, a pinpoint on a map, a line in a list, an entry in a dbase. a person turns into a granular but of information.

Gale analytics on demand – similar the keynote speaker at Macalester LibTech 2019. https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/posts/1995793570531130?comment_id=1995795043864316&comment_tracking=%7B%22tn%22%3A%22R%22%7D

personas

by designing for yourself or your team, you are potentially building discrimination right into your product Erica Hall.

Search algorithms.

what is relevance. the relevance of the ranking algorithm. for whom (what patron). crummy searches.

reckless associsations – made by humans or computers – can do very real harm especially when they appear in supposedly neutral environments.

Donna Lanclos and Andrew Asher Ethonography should be core to the business of the library.

technology as information ecology. co-evolve. prepare to start asking questions to see the effect of our design choices.

ethnography of library: touch point tours – a student to give a tour to the librarians or draw a map of the library , give a sense what spaces they use, what is important. ethnographish

Q from the audience: if instructors warn against Google and Wikipedia and steer students to library and dbases, how do you now warn about the perils of the dbases bias? A: put fires down, and systematically, try to build into existing initiatives: bi-annual magazine, as many places as can

1 2 3 4 5 17