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instructional design and models

Instructional Design Models and Theories

https://elearningindustry.com/instructional-design-models-and-theories

Instructional Design Models and Theories History*

  1. 1903 – Ivan Pavlov discovers Classical Conditioning Theory, while conducting research on the digestive system of dogs.
  2. 1910 – Thorndike introduces its Laws and Connectionism Theory, which are based on the Active Learning Principles.
  3. 1922 – Max Wertheimer, Kurt Koffka and Wolfgang Köhler introduce Gestalt Psychology.
  4. 1932 – Psychologist Frederic Bartlett proposes the Schema Theory.
  5. 1937 – B.F. Skinner introduces the Operant Conditioning Theory.
  6. 1937 – May and Doob publish Competition and Cooperation, where the Cooperative and Collaborative Learning Theory is launched, discussed and analyzed.
  7. 1950s – The Information Processing Theory emerges.
  8. 1950s – Computer-based Instruction is used in educational and training environments.
  9. 1954 – Skinner introduces the Programmed Instruction Educational Model.
  10. 1960s – The Inquiry-based Learning Model is developed, based on constructivist learning theories.
  11. 1961 – Jerome Bruner introduces the Discovery Learning Model.
  12. 1960s – Howard Barrows introduces Problem-based Learning (PBL) in the medical education program at McMaster University in Canada.
  13. 1963 – David Ausubel publishes his findings on the Subsumption Theory.
  14. 1962 – The Keller Plan revolves around the Individualized Instruction Model and is used in educational environments throughout the United States.
  15. 1971 – Allan Paivio hypothesized about the Dual Coding Theory; a theory of cognition.
  16. 1974 – Merlin Wittrock publishes the Generative Learning Theory.
  17. 1978- Vygotsky’s Sociocultural Learning Theory influences the West.
  18. 1979 – Charles Reigeluth introduces the Elaboration Theory.
  19. 1980 – Reginald Revans introduces the Action Learning Model.
  20. 1983 – David Merrill introduces the Component Display Theory and Instructional Model.
  21. 1983 – J. M. Keller’s ARCS Model of Motivation is published.
  22. 1988 – Spiro, Feltovich, and Coulson introduce their Cognitive Flexibility Theory.
  23. 1989 – Brown, Collins, Duguid and Newman introduce their Situated Cognition Theory and the Cognitive Apprenticeship Model.
  24. 1990 – The Cognition & Technology Group at Vanderbilt University develops the Anchored InstructionEducational Model.
  25. 1990s – Multimedia and CD-ROMs are introduced in educational environments.
  26. 1991 – Lave and Wenger introduce the Communities of Practice Model and the Situated Learning Theory in “Situated learning: legitimate peripheral participation”.
  27. 1991 – Hudspeth and Knirk publish the case-based Learning Model in Performance Improvement Quarterly.
  28. 1992 – Roger C. Schank releases a technical report, introducing the Goal-based Scenario Model.
  29. 1993 – The first Computer-supported Intentional Learning Environments (CSILEs) prototype is used in a university setting.
  30. 1995 – Saltzberg and Polyson publish Distributed Learning on the World Wide Web, which outlines the Distributed Learning Model.
  31. 1995 – Dodge and March develop WebQuest.
  32. 1996 – Professor Joseph R. Codde publishes a report that outlines Contract Learning.
  33. 2007 – M. Lombardi publishes a report, outlining the Authentic Learning Model.

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New Directions in Instructional Design

ELI Online Focus Session

New Directions in Instructional Design: Keeping Pace in a Time of Rapid Change

April 19 & 20, 2017 | Noon–3:30 p.m. (ET)

https://events.educause.edu/eli/focus-sessions/2017/new-directions-in-instructional-design-keeping-pace-in-a-time-of-rapid-change

  • What new organizational models and practices do instructional design teams need to adopt?
  • How can instructional designers best make use of the increasing amount of learning data that is available?
  • What kinds of evidence-based practices make the most sense for instructional designers?
  • What are some professional development approaches that provide structure for instructional designers to share their mutual areas of expertise, while focusing on key areas of professional growth?
  • Learning technologists and instructional designers
  • Campus teaching and learning center directors and staff
  • Faculty members and instructors
  • Senior teaching and learning administrators (e.g., deans, provost office staff)
  • Librarians
  • Presentation Sessions: Sessions designed to provide an overview of specific topic areas and successful emerging approaches related to the focus session theme immediately followed by opportunities to interact one-on-one with session presenters.
  • Project Rounds: A series of institutional cases/examples presented in a sequential, fast-paced format exploring a single project, emerging technology, or campus initiative. Project rounds will be followed by an opportunity for separate discussion with each of the presenters.

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Collaborative Instructional Technology Support Model

Online Course | Designing a Collaborative Instructional Technology Support Model

Part 1: March 7, 2018 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 2: March 14, 2018 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET
Part 3: March 21, 2018 | 1:00–2:30 p.m. ET

Faculty need a variety of instructional technology support—instructional design, content development, technology, training, and assessment—to name a few. They don’t want to go to one place for help, find out they’re in the wrong place, and be sent somewhere else—digitally or physically. Staff don’t want to provide help in silos or duplicate what other units are doing.

So, how can academic service providers collaborate to offer the right instructional technology support services, in the right place, at the right time, in the right way? In this course, instructional technologists, instructional designers, librarians, and instructional technology staff will learn to use a tool called the Service Center Canvas that does just that.

Learning Objectives:

During this course, participants will:

  • Explore the factors that influence how instructional technology support services are offered in higher education
  • Answer critical questions about how your instructional technology support services should be delivered relative to broader trends and institutional goals
  • Experiment with ways to prototype new services and/or new ways of delivering them
  • Identify potential implementation obstacles and ways to address them

NOTE: Participants will be asked to complete assignments in between the course segments that support the learning objectives stated below and will receive feedback and constructive critique from course facilitators on how to improve and shape their work.

Course Facilitators

Elliot FelixElliot Felix, Founder and CEO, brightspot strategy

Felix founded and leads brightspot, a strategy consultancy that reimagines places, rethinks services, and redesigns organizations on university campuses so that people are better connected to a purpose, information, and each other. Felix is accomplished strategist, facilitator, and sense-maker who has helped transform over 70 colleges and universities.


 

Adam GriffAdam Griff, Director, brightspot strategy

Adam Griff is a director at brightspot. He helps universities rethink their space, reinvent their service offerings, and redesign their organization to improve the experiences of their faculty, students, and staff, connecting people and processes to create simple and intuitive answers to complex questions. He has led projects with a wide range of higher education institutions including University of Wisconsin–Madison, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and University of California, Berkeley.

microlearning instructional design

Microlearning: The Emerging Instructional Design Strategy in Elearning

BY SYED AMJAD ALI NOVEMBER 8, 2017

https://elearning.adobe.com/2017/11/microlearning-the-emerging-instructional-design-strategy-in-elearning/
Microlearning is a learning strategy that involves bite-sized learning nuggets (small and focused segments) designed to meet a specific learning outcome. To put it simply, the learning content is chunked to reduce learner’s cognitive overload making it easy for learners to absorb and recall.

An effective microlearning course:

  • Provides deeper learning on a specific concept or a performance objective
  • Is bite-sized, effectively chunked and easily digestible
  • Designed for exact moment-of-need – Right information at right time
  • Ideal for extended performance support providing a better mobile learning experience
  • Focused on a single performance objective, concept or idea
  • Is usually 4 to 5 minutes in length, or shorter
My note:
Adobe is trying to reshape an old theory: chunking
http://snitkof.com/cg156/chunkingtheory.php
https://elearning.adobe.com/2017/11/microlearning-the-emerging-instructional-design-strategy-in-elearning/
by calling it “microlearning”?
What do you think?

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instructional design

Developments in Instructional Design

https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2015/5/eli7120-pdf.pdf

Mobile computing, cloud computing, and data-rich repositories have altered ideas about where and how learning takes place.
designers can find themselves filling a variety of roles. They might design large, complex systems or work with faculty and departments to develop courses and curricula. They might migrate traditional resources to mobile or adaptive platforms. They might help administrators understand the value and potential of new learning strategies and tools. Today’s instructional designer might work with subject-matter experts, coders, graphic designers, and others. Moreover, the work of an instructional designer increasingly continues throughout the duration of a course rather than taking place upfront
Given the expanding role and landscape of technology—as well as the growing body of knowledge about learning and about educational activities and assessments—dedicated instructional designers are increasingly common and often take a stronger role.
Competency based learning allows students to progress at their own pace and finish assignments, courses, and degree plans as time and skills permit. Data provided by analytics systems can help instructional designers predict which pedagogical approaches might be most effective and tailor learning experiences accordingly. The use of mobile learning continues to grow, enabling new kinds of learning experiences.
In some contexts, instructional designers might work more directly with students, teaching them lifelong learning skills. Students might begin coursework by choosing from a menu of options, creating their own path through content, making choices about learning options, being more hands-on, and selecting best approaches for demonstrating mastery. Educational models that feature adaptive and personalized learning will increasingly be a focus of instructional design.
Instructional designers bring a cross-disciplinary approach to their work, showing faculty how learning activities used in particular subject areas might be effective in others. In this way, instructional designers can cultivate a measure of consistency across courses and disciplines in how educational strategies and techniques are incorporated.
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instructional design models

http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/top-instructional-design-models-explained

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/208995238935184556
addie

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https://www.pinterest.com/pin/370632244304193135/

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more on instructional design in this IMS blog
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instructional design librarian

Conversations With Blended Librarians: The Evolving Instructional Design Librarian now available

Published on

Joelle Pitts is an Instructional Design Librarian and Associate Professor at Kansas State University Libraries. She is responsible for the creation and maintenance of web-based learning objects and environments aimed at improving the information literacy of the Kansas State University community. She leads the New Literacies Alliance, an inter-institutional information literacy consortium. Her research interests include distance education and e-learning theory and design, library user experience (UX), as well as the design and implementation of games-based learning environments.

The view the recorded session visit http://blendedlibrarian.learningtimes.net/

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instructional design librarian

Instructional Design Librarians #libraries #edtech #highered

http://www.scoop.it/t/blended-librarianship/p/4070053667/2016/10/04/blended-librarians-conversations-instr-design-librarians-libraries-edtech-highered

Thursday, October 13 at 3:00 pm EST with guest Joelle Pitts from Kansas State University Libraries.

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