brain, identity, emotion

Why Identity and Emotion are Central To Motivating the Teen Brain

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/12/10/why-identity-and-emotion-are-central-to-motivating-the-teen-brain/

There’s heightened awareness of social status, especially as they realize that acts of courage can earn them higher social status among peers.
My note: Badges can be the perfect materialization of channeling the social status notion among teenagers.

videonotes for flipped lessons

Creating Flipped Lessons With VideoNotes

 http://practicaledtech.com/2015/01/12/practical-ed-tech-tip-of-the-week-creating-flipped-lessons-with-videonotes/

http://www.videonot.es/

VideoNotes allows you to load a video on the left side of your screen then on the right side of the screen VideoNotes gives you a notepad on which to type.

1. How to Create a Jeopardy-style Game in Google Spreadsheets
2. How to Use Doctopus and Goobric to Grade Google Classroom Assignments
3. Using Timelines as Digital Portfolios and Reflections on Learning
4. How to Add Custom Columns to Padlet Walls
5. ReadWorks Now Offers Poems and Question Sets for K-12 Classrooms
6. PicCollage, ThingLink, and A Visit to the USS Alabama
7. A Couple of Graphing Calculators for Your Chrome Browser

quests in education

Pursuing Quests: How Digital Games Can Create a Learning Journey

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/12/04/pursuing-quests-how-digital-games-can-create-a-learning-journey

Paul Darvasi

Completing missions for rewards is a core mechanic in many video games, including best-sellers like “World of Warcraft,” “Grand Theft Auto,” “Fallout” and “Skyrim.” Quests are diverse and optional, and players can undertake them on their own schedule.

A good quest-based curriculum meets the needs of many students by offering a multiplicity of choices that cover standards

We began looking for ways to meta-game curricular activities,” said Haskell. “We built 3D GameLab to allow us to deliver any curriculum with game-based mechanics

When he first waded into quest-based learning, Isaacs created one central quest path that his students followed at slightly varied paces, and he added some optional side quests that could be completed for extra credits.

“Reluctant or disenfranchised students are very likely to demonstrate renewed interest and engagement when presented with the game-infused option,” she said. “Once the kids were granted some agency in the trajectory of their learning, they really wanted to succeed.” But she also recognizes that games may not be for everybody.

More on Minecraft in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=minecraft&submit=Search

 

augmented reality and education

Amazon Wants To Beam Augmented Reality Into Your Living Room

Aaron Tilley

Amazon has built up a nice little collection of devices at its Palo Alto, Calif.-based hardware division, Lab126.

 

=== higher ed ======= higher ed ======= higher ed ======= higher ed ======= higher ed ======= higher ed ====

Colleges begin to take virtual reality seriously

http://www.ecampusnews.com/technologies/colleges-virtual-reality-941

the power of VR goes beyond simply recruiting. The University of Michigan uses the technology as a learning tool, and by instituting a virtual reality “cave” they’ve allowed engineering students to interact with virtual structures as they “come together, buckle and collapse.” Instead of relying on physical models—which tend to be large, expensive, and slow to build—a student using the MIDEN VR cave can fly around a virtual structure to study mechanical connections.

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New Horizon Report 2015 K12 Edition

http://k12.wiki.nmc.org/Augmented+Reality

Will Virtual Reality Stake Its Claim in K–12 Classrooms?

As the cost to install and support enabling technologies continues to fall, VR-based instruction will likely become a reality in K–12 schools.

More on virtual reality in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=virtual+reality&submit=Search

on education and gamification

Tom said to himself that it was not such a hollow world, after all. He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it—namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain. If he had been a great and wise philosopher, like the writer of this book, he would now have comprehended that Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. And this would help him to understand why constructing artificial flowers or performing on a tread-mill is work, while rolling ten-pins or climbing Mont Blanc is only amusement. There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger-coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service, that would turn it into work and then they would resign.

Twain, M. (2006). The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Chapter 2.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/74/74-h/74-h.htm#c2

gamification and design

Gamification and the Progressive Challenge Design Pattern

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/gamification-progressive-challenge-design-pattern-robert-bilyk

Director, Center for Online Learning at Metropolitan State University

Sebastian Deterding and his online portfolio at http://codingconduct.cc/

online instructors can use gamification to boost student interest in their content.

Educational games can ‘hook’ students through extrinsic motivators and gradually promote an appreciation of the content and a level of satisfaction from the pursuit of knowledge and the solution of problems.

 

games and learning

Four Inventive Games That Show Us the Future of Learning

http://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2015/11/26/four-inventive-games-that-show-us-the-future-of-learning

Earth Primer

Designed by Chaim Gingold, a Ph.D. student at UC Santa Cruz, indie developer and designer of Spore’s creature creator, “Earth Primer” is a reinvention of the textbook. Unlike the all-too-familiar “interactive textbooks” that are little more than pictures and animations tacked on to traditional text, “Earth Primer” starts from the ground up. It’s elegantly presented and paced.

Metamorphabet

Patrick Smith, the designer behind “Metamorphabet,” is like the games equivalent of a toymaker.

Extrasolar

Money and time are the two most common barriers to using games in the classroom. “Extrasolar” solves both while also striking pedagogical gold: authentic, self-motivated learning. It’s a free alternate reality game (ARG) that mimics the day-to-day life of a rover driver exploring an alien planet for a mysterious space agency. Rather than placing players in some fantastical world, they interact with what looks like a typical desktop interface, giving their rover commands, and waiting to receive photographs and data from the alien world as well as messages from their employer. Each bit of play requires only a few minutes of activity. The wait builds tension, and when matched with the relatively mundane interface and tasks, it doesn’t feel like a game — which is kind of the point. Best of all: It’s all based in real science and, like with any good ARG, has a healthy dose of mystery to give players a reason to return.

Twine is an open-source tool for telling interactive, nonlinear stories.

http://twinery.org//

You don’t need to write any code to create a simple story with Twine, but you can extend your stories with variables, conditional logic, images, CSS, and JavaScript when you’re ready.

Twine publishes directly to HTML, so you can post your work nearly anywhere. Anything you create with it is completely free to use any way you like, including for commercial purposes.

Twine was originally created by Chris Klimas in 2009 and is now maintained by a whole bunch of people at several differentrepositories.

https://www.graphite.org/ – reviews and ratings for educational materials

immersive journalism, games, and empathy

Virtual reality breathes life into immersive storytelling

http://www.hypergridbusiness.com/2015/01/virtual-reality-breathes-life-into-immersive-storytelling/

Virtual Games Try To Generate Real Empathy For Faraway Conflict

James Delahoussaye

Project Syria, a virtual reality experience built by a team of students at USC.

“I sometimes call virtual reality an empathy generator,” she says. “It’s astonishing to me. People all of a sudden connect to the characters in a way that they don’t when they’ve read about it in the newspaper or watched it on TV.”

What Peña’s doing — using virtual reality in combination with reporting — is part of a wider landscape of video games being created to explore the news. And they’re called, appropriately enough, “newsgames.”

“There’s an argument to be made that games are perfect at getting at the systemic problems and challenges in the world,” says Ian Bogost, a professor at Georgia Tech.

He says games are really good at showing the complex underbelly of stories.

Take a game that he helped make called Oil God. In the game, the player controls an oil-rich region, waging wars and inciting coupes. The player learns that oil prices are contingent on all sorts of factors rarely mentioned in a story about the price of a gallon of gas.

The Sociology of Videogames

http://sociologyofvideogames.com/2015/01/25/can-video-games-create-empathy-and-awareness-for-real-world-issues/

creating games to bring awareness to social issues for over a decade.  The game to create the biggest waves was arguably MTV’s “Darfur is Dying” released online in 2006, in which players took up the role of a family displaced by conflict in Darfur.