Posts Tagged ‘collaboration.’

teaching and assessing soft skills

Teaching & Assessing Soft Skills

http://catlintucker.com/2017/09/teaching-assessing-soft-skills/

Communication in Person & Online (available in PDF format here: Communication in Person Online Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/16JVAivizIysXdmUVXzC2BP2NiclbJ21N9cOZQ6NdqxU/edit

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Limited, to no, participation in discussions.

 

Does not come to discussions prepared. As a result, fails to support statements with evidence from texts and other research.

 

Few attempts to ask questions or build on ideas shared.

 

Frequently violates the “dos and don’ts of online communication.”

Limited participation in discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with various partners.

 

Does not consistently come to discussions prepared. Limited preparation and inability to support statements with evidence from texts and other research reflects lack of preparation.

 

Limited attempts to ask questions, build on ideas shared, or invite quieter voices into the conversation.

 

Hesitant to respond to other perspectives and fails to summarize points or make connections.

 

Occasionally violates the “dos and don’ts of online communication.”

Participates in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners.

 

Comes to discussions prepared, having read and researched material. Draws on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic.

 

Attempts to drive conversations forward by asking questions, building on ideas shared, and inviting quieter voices into the conversation.

Responds to diverse perspectives, summarizes points, and makes connections.

 

Respects the “dos and don’ts for online communication.”

Initiates and participates effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners.

Comes to discussions prepared with a unique perspective, having read and researched material; explicitly draws on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic.

Propels conversations by posing and responding to questions that relate to the current discussion. (Adds depth by providing a new, unique perspective to the discussion.)

Responds thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarizes points of agreement and disagreement, and makes new connections. Leans in and actively listens.

Makes eye contact, speaks loud enough to be heard, and body language is strong.

Respects the “dos and don’ts for online communication.”

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving,  (available in PDF format here: Critical Thinking Problem Solving Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fjlODmLvrVZyrKnzz54LbVa7CqfbAJvLfb98805fjuY/edit

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Reflects surface level understanding of information.

 

Unable or unwilling to evaluate quality of information or draw conclusions about information found.

Does not try to solve problems or help others solve problems. Lets others do the work.

 

Does not actively seek answers to questions or attempt to find information. Does not seek out peers or ask teacher for guidance or support.

Attempts to dive below the surface when analyzing information but work lacks depth.

Struggles to evaluate the quality of information and does not draw insightful conclusions about information found.

Does not suggest or refine solutions, but is willing to try out solutions suggested by others.

Asks teachers or other students for answers but does not use online tools, like Google and YouTube, to attempt to answer questions or find information.

Demonstrates a solid understanding of the information.

 

Evaluates the quality of information and makes inferences/draws conclusions.

 

Refines solutions suggested by others.

 

Attempts to use online tools, like Google and YouTube, to seek answers and find information.

Demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of the information.

 

Effectively evaluates the quality of information and makes inferences/draws conclusion that are insightful.

 

Actively looks for and suggests solutions to problems.

 

Uses online tools, like Google and YouTube, to proactively seek answers and find information.

 

 

Collaboration & Contributions in a Team Dynamic  (available in PDF format here: Collaboration Contributions in a Team Dynamic Rubric)

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ucjgylXWz8nOM5Vq8FpTByur8smsbov3mR8pX-7n1SE/edit

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Fails to listen to, share with, and support the efforts of team members making accomplishing a task more difficult for the team.

Frequently inattentive or distracting when team members talk. Requires frequent redirection by team members and/or teacher.

Body language does not reflect engagement in the process. Focus on leaning in, asking questions, actively listening (e.g. make eye contact).

Rarely offers feedback. Frequently becomes impatient, frustrated, and/or disrespectful.

 

Limited attempts to move between roles.

Does not use resources to support the team’s work.

Attempts to listen to, share with, and support the efforts of team members are limited or inconsistent.

Does not always listen when team members talk and requires redirection by team members and/or teacher.

Body language does not reflect engagement in the process. Focus on leaning in, asking questions, actively listening (e.g. make eye contact).

Occasionally offers feedback. At times, becomes impatient or frustrated with the process making teamwork more challenging.

Limited attempts to move between roles.

Does not consistently use resources to support the team’s work.

Listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of team members.

Listens when team members talk.

Attempts to engage in group tasks; however, body language does not consistently communicate interest or attention. Body language reflects engagement in the process, but there is room for improvement.

Offers feedback and treats team members with respect. At times, becomes impatient or frustrated with the process making teamwork more challenging.

Attempts to be flexible and move between roles; at times dominates a particular role. This is an area of potential growth.

Uses resources to support the team’s work.

Consistently listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of team members.

 

Leans in and actively listens when team members talk.

 

Body language communicates interest in team tasks and engagement in the process.

 

Offers constructive feedback, treats team members with respect, and is patient with the process.

 

Creates balance on the team moving between responsibilities without dominating any one role.

 

Uses resources effectively to support the team’s work.

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more on soft skills in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=soft+skills

Susan Grajek at Bryan Alexander on IT and education

Susan Grajek at Bryan Alexander on IT and education

Forum takes a deep dive into higher education and technology. On Thursday, March 23rd, from 2-3 pm EST we will be joined by Susan Grajek, the vice president for communities and research at EDUCAUSE

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Top 10 IT Issues, 2017: Foundations for Student Success

WordPress and Google Docs

WordPress.com for Google Docs lets you edit in Docs and publish in WordPress

collaborative whiteboards

Collaborative Whiteboards

Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week – Three Free Collaborative Whiteboard Tools

NoteBookCast is a free whiteboard tool that will work in the web browser on a laptop, iPad, Android tablet, and Windows tablet. NoteBookCast is a collaborative whiteboard tool. You can invite others to join your whiteboard by entering the code assigned to your whiteboard. You can chat while drawing on NoteBookCast whiteboards. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how to use NoteBookCast.

Web Whiteboard makes it easy to include a whiteboard in your Google+ Hangout. In the video embedded below I demonstrate how easy it is to use Web Whiteboard in a Google+ Hangout.

Stoodle is a free collaborative whiteboard tool hosted by the CK12 Foundation. You can use text chat while sharing your whiteboard. Registration is not required in order to use Stoodle. In the video embedded below I demonstrate the features of Stoodle.

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more on white boards in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=white+boards

engagement and contemplative practices

The On Course National Conference

http://oncourseworkshop.com/national-conference-overview/

has several sessions of interest:

Padlet Possibilities – Using Their Phones to Keep Their Attention in Class
Presenters: Kathy Magee and Paul Phillips, Faculty, Occupational Health and Safety, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology
Summary: Tired of fighting your students’ phones for their attention? Maybe it’s because the phone is more interesting than the lesson (or worse, than you). Why not use those phones to encourage participation in the day’s classroom activities and keep the on the learning and lessons you have planned. This session will have participants using their Ipads, tablets, and phones to access Padlet in order to identify, discuss, and adapt ways that this free software can be used in multi-disciplines.

Using PBL, and Active and Collaborative Techniques in Science Teaching
Presenter: Stamatis Muratidis, Faculty, Chemistry, Palo Alto College, TX
Summary: Participants interested in tips for successfully involving students by developing Active and Collaborative Learning (ACL) techniques will be engaged by use of a variety of topics, models and tools. Most of the workshop will take place in a collaborative group format and best practices for forming, molding and nurturing collaborative groups will be emphasized. Along the way the presenter will be promoting data-driven best practices, while identifying and mitigating some of the common pitfalls of implementing PBL and ACL activities.

Relax, Reflect, Relate: 3 R’s of Contemplative Practice
Presenter: William H. Johnson, Jr., Student Success Coordinator/Personal Development Coach, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC
Summary: Is life moving too fast? Are you busy beyond belief? Well, slow down! Would you attend a session that allows you to take the time to relax and be still, reflect on your life, and relate your thoughts and feelings to others? If you answered “yes” to at least one of these questions, then this workshop is for you. Research has shown that people applying some type of contemplative practice in their lives are likely to be more engaged, and are healthier and happier in life. Attendees in this session will participate in two forms of contemplative practice – meditation and reflective writing – that enhance personal growth. By the end of the session, you will learn strategies to quiet the mind, engage the spirit, and connect with others!

Study Smarter, Not Just Harder!
Presenter: Amy Munson, Director of Instructional Design, United States Air Force Academy
Summary: The United States Air Force Academy Science of Teaching and Learning program is conducting a study on how students learn about their own learning. The research team hypothesizes that students learn more from peers than from “outsiders” such as faculty members and has set out to develop a peer training and messaging program alongside a faculty training and messaging program using the same three highly successful learning/self-management strategies. On Course structures and strategies were implemented for the training components as researchers shared the benefits of practice testing, spaced practice and successive relearning as defined in Dunlosky and Rawson’s meta-analysis of learning strategies. This workshop will give participants an opportunity to learn more about those three strategies while also learning about how to implement a student “train the trainer” program.

 

digital portfolio

Digital Portfolios: Facilitating Authentic Learning and Cultivating Student Ownership

presented on Tuesday, March 3, 2015.

Steve Zimmerman (charter school director), New York

digital porfolio software: open source. Google Sites – free, but too laborious for teachers

must be student owned and intuitive interface (you cannot say this about MN eFolio)

assessment rubrics

easy sharing and feedback

accessible form mobile devices (you cannot say this about MN eFolio)

easy integration with other applications (you cannot say this about MN eFolio)

Tina Holland

she is not a test person. good for her.
writing, critical thinking, creative thinking, soft skills (communication, collaboration, negotiation). team players, problme solvers, prioritize,

education is moving from traditional teaching methods, to inquiry based. self-directed learning. from summative to formative assessment

21st century learning competencies

#DigitalPortfolio

the presentation is now available on-demand at: http://w.on24.com/r.htm?e=936737&s=1&k=93DDFD3EB35B18A080B8EB13DD8FA770.

More on digital portfolio in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=digital+portfolio

Online Learning: MOOC – resources and ideas

http://chronicle.com/section/Online-Learning/623/

A MOOC Platform Based on Engagement:
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2013/11/06/a-mooc-platform-based-on-engagement.aspx

COLLEGE UNBOUND: THE FUTURE OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR STUDENTS

Posted on November 5, 2013 by 
http://www.knewton.com/blog/knewton/education-technology/2013/11/05/college-unbound/