Searching for "digital literacy edad"

digital literacy for EDAD

one-credit courses on digital literacy offered for the School of Education department for Educational Leadership

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EDAD 697Introduction to Educational Technology

1 credit, summer 2016

Technology forecast for education: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/01/27/4710/

Course Description

This synchronous online course will introduce school administrators to the multitude and complexity of educational technology issues. Through group discussions and exercises, the course will focus on the development of knowledge, skills and depositions to effective professional practice in educational leadership. The goal of the course is to develop knowledge and understanding of appropriate application of technology in the teaching and learning process and in the management of educational programs.
Information and experience in the course will include review of the latest trends in technology. Familiarity to acquisition of expertise will be sought in understand and use of Web 2.0 and Web 3.0, as well as social media, multimedia and interactivity and how it affects school life as well as the role of the educational leader. Specific attention will be paid to the importance and ability to develop and maintain policies, which reflect the ever-changing world of technology. Auxiliary, but no less important issues such as legal issues, copyright issues, ethics and other forms of digital citizenship will be discussed.

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course the student will:

Course Objective Knowledge Skill Disposition Impact
1.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of related technologies appropriate to the management of a school # o o
2.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of related technologies appropriate to the instructional program of a school # o o
3.      Demonstrate knowledge and the use of various types of related technologies for supporting the instructional program of the school # o o
4.      Demonstrate knowledge of planning and management procedures and policies for the appropriate use of technological resources to serve the mission of the school # o o
5.      Demonstrate knowledge of common computer and related technological applications # o o
6.      Identify gender & diversity issues related to technology in education o o o
7.      Demonstrate knowledge of adaptive technology devices for individuals with special needs o o o o
8.      Demonstrate skill in the use of technology for materials preparation, presentations, record keeping, computation, communication, information / data collection and management, and the effective use of the Internet o o o
9.      Demonstrate an understanding of legal issues, including copyright issues, related to educational technology o o
10.  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of ethical practice in the use of technology o o
11.  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of administrative policies and procedures that promote appropriate utilization of technology by school personnel o o o
12.  Demonstrate familiarity with appropriate professional standards related to educational leadership and technology o o o o
13.  Demonstrate an understanding of the digital age learning culture, digital citizenship in particular o o

 

# http://ed.mnsu.edu/edleadership/docs/license_competencies/K-12_Principal_Competencies_revised_8_22_08.pdf

National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators.

http://www.iste.org/standards/ISTE-standards/standards-for-administrators

Demonstrate familiarity with appropriate professional standards related to educational leadership and technology
http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2015/ProfessionalStandardsforEducationalLeaders2015forNPBEAFINAL.pdf

Resources On Line

IMS Technology blog: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/

Twitter: #edtech ; #edtechchat ; #edtechUK; @Edtech_K12

Facebook: #edtech ;  #edleadership

Pinterest #edtech; #edleadership ; #edtechleadership

Agency for Instructional Technology             http://www.ait.net

Center for Technology and Teacher Education            http://www.teacherlink.org

Center for Children and Technology            http://www.edc.org/CCT/

T.H.E. Journal (Technology Horizons in Education Online Journal)            http://www.thejournal.com

Cybertimes Navigator (New York Times) http://www.nytimes.com/navigator

International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)            http://cnets.iste.org/

Technology Standards for School Administrators (TSSA)   http://cnets.iste.org/tssa

ISTE curriculum and Content Area Standards   http://Cnets.iste.org/currstands/

Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to use Technology (PT3)              http://www.pt3.org

Assistive Technology information:  http://www.abilityhub.com  http://www.enablemart.com

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EDAD ??? Technology and Curriculum Design

1 credit, Summer 2016

Course Description

This course seeks hands-on experience in integration of educational technology into the classroom. Students will learn to select opportunities for application [or not] of technology in education. The course will provide a hands-on experience for educational leaders to understand the application of technology in the curriculum process. Topics of consideration include instructional design, media and formats, devices, telecommunications and social interactivity. The course will provide an opportunity to apply technology knowledge and experience in hands-on exercises for curriculum management as well as monitoring student achievement progress. Further discussions and practical approach will include modern, effective and efficient ways of communications among parents, students, faculty and administration. The course offered in synchronous online mode and F2F mode.

Objectives/Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course the student will:

  1. Understand the impact of technology on the teaching and learning process.
  2. Understand the principles of the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and National Educational Standards for Students (NETS*S) and their application in the curriculum process.
  3. Research and assess the opportunities for technology to be integrated in the classroom.

Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/whatisudl

The ISTE National Educational Technology Standards (NETS•T) and

Performance Indicators for Teachers

https://www.kent.edu/sites/default/files/file/ISTEstandards.pdf

 

EDAD ??? Technology as an Integral Part of Successful Educational Leadership

1 credit, Summer 2016

Course Description

Course Description

This class will support teacher leaders and school administrators in reviewing and systematizing the fast aspects of modern electronic technologies. Based on a foundational better understanding of how technologies work, future educational leaders will develop skills and practice the application of ideas, tactics and methods for better integration of technologies in the teaching and learning process as well as the creation of better policies and procedures.

The course is designed to bring research and analytical skills and build structure in the process of resolving technology issues, which educational leaders face in modern schools, including hardware and software problems, networks and computers, curriculum and teaching and learning methods.

The course will offer discussions as well as practical solutions such as social media (e.g. Twitter) for professional development, online tools for teacher evaluation, online tools for collaboration and creativity, immediate and future trends, which already impact education and educational leadership.
The course offered in synchronous online mode and F2F mode.

Objectives/Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to identify and update sources for information to keep current their technology knowledge
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of technology leadership standards.
  3. Student will demonstrate an understanding of how to create, promote, and sustain a dynamic, digital – age learning culture that provides a rigorous, relevant, and engaging education for all students.
  4. Students will demonstrate understanding of how to promote an environment of professional learning and innovation that empowers educators to enhance student learning through the infusion of contemporary technologies and digital resources.
  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how to provide digital – age leadership and management to continuously improve the organization through the effective use of information and technology resources.
  6. Students will understand and apply knowledge of how to model and facilitate understanding of social, ethical and legal issues and responsibilities related to an evolving digital culture.
  7. Students will demonstrate knowledge of technology as integral part of facilities and resource management
  8. Students will be able to describe and use budget planning and management procedures related to educational computing and technology.
  9. Students will be able to describe and maintain current information involving facilities planning issues related to computers and related technologies.
  10. Students will be able to design and develop policies and procedures concerning staffing, scheduling, and security for managing computers/technology in a variety of instructional and administrative school

digital literacy Confucius Institute

Levi Johnson and students SCSU Confucius Institute

Posted by InforMedia Services on Thursday, August 23, 2018

Plan for Fall 2018

August 23, 2018.

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be assisting in your instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

  1. Social Media for 2018
    1. WeChat and the connection to other social media
      1. building a community on WeChat
    2. SCSU Edublog http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ci/
      1. the idea of a blog. the advantages compared to SM such as WeChat / Facebook
    3. Reflections
      1. Multimedia
    4. Connecting blogs to social media (WeChat and similar)
  2. Digital Literacy instruction
    1. what is digital literacy and how does it differ from other literacies? Why is it important?
      What other literacies must be considered when speaking about DL? E.g. media literacy: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy
    2. Internet Resources
        1. How do we search?
          1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
          2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
          3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
        2. Custom Search Engine:
          http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
        3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services
          https://www.semanticscholar.org/
        4. subject guide 3
        5. –Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)Filtersfilters
        6. ++++++++++++++++
          Search criteriasearch_criteria

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    3. citation management software to organize bibliographic information
    4. Refworkhttps://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
    5. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
      1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
      2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
        http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/

digital literacy ENGL 101

English 101 materials for discussion on digital literacy.

Jamie Heiman.

All materials on #DigitalLiteracy in the IMS blog here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Scenario for digital literacy in English classes:

What do virtual reality, BuzzFeed quizzes and essay writing have in common?

https://www.educationdive.com/news/what-do-virtual-reality-buzzfeed-quizzes-and-essay-writing-have-in-common/527868/

July 18, 2018

high school students now create infographics, BuzzFeed-like quizzes and even virtual reality (VR) experiences to illustrate how they can research, write and express their thoughts.

technology — using sites like CoSpaces Edu and content learning system Schoology (my note: the equivalnet of D2L at SCSU) — to engage and empower her students.

Thinklink, during a session called “Virtually Not an Essay: Technological Alternatives to a standard essay assignment.” (see this blog materials on ThingLink and like here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=thinglink. The author made typo by calling the app “ThinKlink, instead of ThinGlink. Also, to use Thinglink’s Video 360 editor, the free account is not sufficient and the $125/month upgrade is needed. Not a good solution for education)

Jamie: I would love to discuss with you #infographics and #Thinglink for use in your courses and the Departmental course.

Digital literacy (DL): options, ideas, possibilities

Digital Storytelling for EDAD 652

Community Relations for Administrators EDAD 652

Instructor Kay Worner

A discussion with Kay’s class of school administrators about the use of digital storytelling as a tool for community relations.

discussion based on LIB 490/590
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/

  • Introduction (5-10 min)
    Plamen: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
    students: interests and related information
  • Group assignment (5-10 min)
    Effective communication strategies. List 3-5 and discuss the pros and cons (what makes them effective and are there any impediments, limitations)
  • Class discussion on effective communication strategies: based on the group work findings, how do you think digital storytelling may be [can it be] an effective communication tool

What is Storytelling? How does it differ from Digital Storytelling?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_storytelling

Rossiter & Garcia (2010)  consider “digital stories are short vignettes that combine the art of telling stories with multimedia objects including images, audio, and video” (p. 37)

Is Digital Storytelling more then just storytelling on technology steroids?

What is Digital Storytelling (DS) for school leadership? A bibliographic research reveals a plenitude of research on DS in the classroom, for educators, but not much for educational leaders.
Guajardo, Oliver, Rodrigez, Valcez, Cantu, & Guajardo (2011) view digital storytelling for emerging educational leaders as “as a process for data creation, analysis, and synthesis.”

There is information for corporate leaders or community leaders and DS, but not much for ed leaders.

Let’s create our own understanding of digital storytelling for educational leaders.

Basic definitions, concepts and processes.

  • Learn about Web 1.0 versus Web 2.0; the Cloud; transliteracy and multiliteracy

Multimodal Literacy refers to meaning-making that occurs through the reading, viewing, understanding, responding to and producing and interacting with multimedia and digital texts. It may include oral and gestural modes of talking, listening and dramatising as well as writing, designing and producing such texts. The processing of modes, such as image, words, sound and movement within texts can occur simultaneously and is often cohesive and synchronous. Sometimes specific modes may dominate.

http://guides.library.stonybrook.edu/digital-storytelling

  • Social Media and digital storytelling
    which social media tools would you employ to ensure a digital story happening?

When you hear the term, Digital Storytelling, do you immediately consider Social Media?

IT’S A MINDSET – NOT A SKILL
http://turndog.co/2015/06/16/how-to-use-social-media-in-your-digital-storytelling/

Share Your Brand’s (School?) Story
https://www.postplanner.com/digital-storytelling-techniques-secret-sauce-social-media/

  • group work (15-20) min
    split in groups of 3: an ed leader, a media specialist (or teacher with technology background) and a teacher (to represent a school committee on community relations)
    you have 5 min to research (Internet, access to school resources) and 5-10 min to come up with a strategy for use of digital storytelling for expanding and improving community relationship
    Base your strategy on existing examples.
    E.g.:
    Do the following electronic resources regarding this particular educational institution relay digital story:
    http://strideacademy.org/
    https://www.facebook.com/StrideAcademy/
    https://twitter.com/search?q=Stride%20Academy%20Charter%20School&src=tyah
    https://youtu.be/eekIUqMQ4v0
    What do you like?
    What would you do differently?
  • Digital Storytelling for building, expanding, improving community relations – final thoughts

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literature:
Rossiter, M., & Garcia, P. A. (2010). Digital storytelling: A new player on the narrative field.
New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2010(126), 37-48.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.
com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3daph%26AN%3d51532202%26
site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Guajardo, M., Oliver, J. A., Rodriguez, G., Valadez, M. M., Cantu, Y., & Guajardo, F. (2011). Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling. Journal Of Research On Leadership Education, 6(5), 145-161.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3deric%26AN%3dEJ958883%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

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more on digital storytelling in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+storytelling

digital literacy for SOE students

Digital literacy for SOE students

Class ED 610 Introduction to Curriculum and Instruction Summer 2018

Instructor:     Hsuehi(Martin) Lo

short link to this session: http://bit.ly/edad829

for online participation, please use the following Zoom or Adobe Connect session (your instructor will direct you which one:

  1. For Zoom, please use the following URL to login:
    https://zoom.us/j/4684903124

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be leading your digital literacy instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

Here is a preliminary plan. We will not follow it strictly; it is just an idea about the topics we would like to cover. Shall there be points of interest, please feel free to contribute prior and during the session.

Keeping in mind the ED 610 Learning Goals and Objectives, namely:

  1. Understand and demonstrate how to write literature review in the field of the C&I research
  2. Understand the related research methods in both quantitative and qualitative perspectives from the explored research articles
  3. Understand how to use searching engine to find meaningful articles
  4. Interpret and do critical thinking in C&I research articles

lets review our search and research skills:

  1. How do we search?
    1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
    3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (NASSP), Stacks of magazines, csu library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
  2. Custom Search Engine:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
  3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

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PICO framework to structure a question:
Population, Patient, Problem
Intervention
Comparison
Outcome

prepare systematic review

  1. Subject Guides
    Please locate theEducation (Elementary)
    Education (Secondary)
    Educational Administration and Leadership (Doctoral)
    Educational Administration and Leadership (Masters)
    at the LRS web page:
    http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/default.asp
    library research guide
    Look for “Research Assistance” and scroll to
    Educational Administration and Leadership or any of the four links related to education
    http://research.stcloudstate.edu/rqs.phtml?subject_id=122
  2. Electronic Journals & the DOI System

    What is a DOI? A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is assigned to electronic journal articles (and selected other online content) to specifically and permanently identify and access that article. Most of the standard academic citation formats now require the inclusion of DOIs within a citation when available.

    How to find a DOI:   Most current academic journal articles include a DOI (usually listed on the first page of the article).  Most library databases list a DOI with the record for recent academic journal articles.  Most non-academic articles (including magazine and newspaper articles) as well as many older academic journal articles do not have a DOI.  Crossref.org provides a DOI Lookup service that will search for a DOI based on citation information (author’s last name, journal name, article title, etc.).

    How to access an article via a DOI: Use the CSU Stanislaus Library DOI Look-up for options provided by the library, including access to the full-text via the publisher’s site or a library database service when available. Other, general DOI look-up systems (CrossRef & DOI.org) usually link to the article’s “homepage” on the publisher’s site (which usually include a free abstract but full-text access is restricted to subscribers).

shall more info be needed and or “proper” session with a reference librarian be requested. http://stcloud.lib.mnscu.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=EDAD-D

-Strategies for conducting advanced searches (setting up filters and search criteria)

Filters

filters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Search criteria

search_criteria

 

 

 

 

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  1. Books and Video
  2. Articles and databases
  3. Journal Title and Citation Finder
  4. Reference and Facts
  5. Institutional Repository
SCSU library web page snapshot with link to repository

SCSU library web page snapshot with link to repository

  1. Simple versus Advanced Search
  2. Interlibrary Loan ILL http://lrts.stcloudstate.edu/library/services/illrequest.asp
  3. Ways to find research specific to doctoral student needs (ie: Ways to find dissertations, peer reviewed research sources, research-related information, etc.)
  4. Understand the responsibilities of authorship including copyright, intellectual property, and discipline-based expectations
  5. Basic Research Resources-Jan 2015 version edit pmConcept mapping:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=concept+map
  6. Explore and select citation management software to organize bibliographic information
  7. Refworks: https://www.refworks.com/refworks2/default.aspx?r=authentication::init&groupcode=RWStCloudSU
  8. Alternatives to Refworks (currently retired):
    1. Zotero, Mendeley, Endnote
    2. Fast and easy bibliographic tools:
      http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/12/06/bibliographic-tools-fast-and-easy/
  1. -Setting up social networking to gather articles and other research information
    slide 9 of the PPT Basic Research Resources

Social media and its importance for the topic research and the dissertation research:

Small business owners use social media primarily as a marketing and search engine optimization tool. However, more and more small businesses are using social media to get answers for business related questions. Specific industry related articles, and statistics are found useful for small business owners in 80% of the cases.
https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140331225132-25026422-small-business-owners-turning-to-social-media

Altmetricshttp://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/10/23/altmetrics-library-lily-troia/

  1. Collaborative Tools
  2. Apps Anywhere (need installation of Citrix Receiver):

 

  1. File/Web space: https://webfs.stcloudstate.edu/main/default.aspx
  2. Dropbox:  https://www.dropbox.com/
  3. Web 2.0 tools: e.g. Diigo.com; Evernote.com
  4. Facebook, Twitter
  5. Blog.stcloudstate.edu

Other sources for information:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/01/27/research-how-to/

Academic.com and ResearchGate

  1. -Saving articles, saving quotes and other article information

Blogs – use tags

hands-on exercise:

learn how to use Zotero and/or Refworks in Microsoft Word

dissertation zotero
and/or
Refworks and/or Mendeley in Google Docs RefWorks ProQuest

 

 

Google Doc ProQuest RefWorks

 

Login into ProQuest Refworks AddOn for Google Doc:

login refworks google doc-y80ulf

Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks
Evernote, Diigo

If Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn, use hashtags

  1. Share any other research-related resources available through the library or other sources

—————-
Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS
Professor
320-308-3072
pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu
http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/
pedagogues under a minute: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/178173728981990450/

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ed leadership and edtech

Edtech playground: Helping teachers choose better tools

By Nicole Krueger Leadership

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=2177

A virtual reality headset can take students on an immersive journey to another world. But no matter how cool it is, if that $3,000 piece of equipment enters a classroom and doesn’t provide any real instructional value, it can quickly become a very expensive paperweight.

Most schools don’t do edtech procurement really well yet. Sometimes we buy products that end up in closets because they don’t fit the instructional needs of students, and we end up not being good stewards of taxpayer dollars.

Located in the district’s central office, where hundreds of teachers and staff members stop by each week for professional development, the playground offers a creative space that encourages teachers to explore new tools that have been vetted and approved by the district’s tech department.

In the United States, K-12 schools spend more than $13 billion a year on edtech — often without any idea whether it will make a difference in learning outcomes.

 

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More on ISTE in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=iste

more on digital literacy for ed leaders in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+EDAD

doctoral literature review

How to do a literature review: Citation tracing, concept saturation and results’ mind-mapping

http://www.raulpacheco.org/2016/06/how-to-do-a-literature-review-citation-tracing-concept-saturation-and-results-mind-mapping/

  1.  engage in citation tracing: you will need to find the key references across the literature for your particular project
  2. map whether your literature review has reached concept saturation: have you exhausted the field for the specific topic you are working on
  3. need to lay out how different citations, bodies of work and key concepts relate to each other

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more on digital literacy for EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+edad

more on proofreading and writing in this IMS lbog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=proofreading+writing

challenges ed leaders technology

The Greatest Challenge Facing School Leaders in a Digital World

By Scott McLeod     Oct 29, 2017

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-10-29-the-greatest-challenge-facing-school-leaders-in-a-digital-world

the Center for the Advanced Study of Tech­nology Leadership in Education – CASTLE

Vision

If a school’s reputation and pride are built on decades or centuries of “this is how we’ve always done things here,” resistance from staff, parents, and alumni to significant changes may be fierce. In such institutions, heads of school may have to steer carefully between deeply ingrained habits and the need to modernize the information tools with which students and faculty work

Too often, when navigating faculty or parental resistance, school leaders and technology staff make reassurances that things will not have to change much in the classroom or that slow baby steps are OK. Unfortunately, this results in a different problem, which is that schools have now invested significant money, time, and energy into digital technologies but are using them sparingly and seeing little impact. In such schools, replicative uses of technology are quite common, but transformative uses that leverage the unique affordances of technology are quite rare.

many schools fail to proceed further because they don’t have a collective vision of what more transformative uses of technology might look like, nor do they have a shared understanding of and commitment to what it will take to get to such a place. As a result, faculty instruction and the learning experiences of students change little or not at all.

These schools have taken the time to involve all stakeholders—including students—in substantive conversations about what digital tools will allow them to do differently compared with previous analog practices. Their visions promote the potential of computing devices to facilitate all of those elements we now think of as essential 21st-century capacities: confidence, curiosity, enthusiasm, passion, critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-direction. Technology doesn’t simply support traditional teaching—it transforms it for deeper thinking and gives students more agency over their own learning.

Fear

Another prevalent issue preventing technology change in schools is fear—fear of change, of the unknown, of letting go of what we know best, of being learners again. But it’s also a fear of letting kids have wide access to the Internet with the possibility of cyberbullying, access to inappropriate material, and exposure to online predators or even excessive advertising. Fears, of course, need to be surfaced and addressed.

The fear drives some schools to ban cellphones, disallow students and faculty from using Facebook, and lock down Internet filters so tightly that useful websites are inaccessible. They prohibit the use of Twitter and YouTube, and they block blogs. Some educators see these types of responses as principled stands against the shortcomings and hassles of digital technologies. Others see them as rejections of the dehumanization of the education process by soulless machines. Often, however, it’s just schools clinging to the past and elevating what is comfortable or familiar over the potential of technology to help them better deliver on their school missions.

Heads of school don’t have to be skilled users themselves to be effective technology leaders, but they do have to exercise appropriate oversight and convey the message—repeatedly—that frequent, meaningful technology use in school is both important and expected. Nostalgia aside, there is no foreseeable future in which the primacy of printed text is not superseded by electronic text and multimedia. When nearly all information is digital or online, multi-modal and multi­media, accessed by mobile devices that fit in our pockets, the question should not be whether schools prepare students for a digital learning landscape, but rather how.

Control

Many educators aren’t necessarily afraid of technology, but they are so accustomed to heavily teacher-directed classrooms that they are leery about giving up control—and can’t see the value in doing so.

Although most of us recognize that mobile computers connected to the Internet may be the most powerful learning devices yet invented—and that youth are learning in powerful ways at home with these technologies—allowing students to have greater autonomy and ownership of the learning process can still seem daunting and questionable.

The “beyond” is particularly important. When we give students some voice in and choice about what and how they learn, we honor basic human needs for autonomy, we enhance students’ interest and engagement, and we truly actualize our missions of preparing lifelong learners.

The goal of instructional transformation is to empower students, not to disempower teachers. While instructor unfamiliarity with digital technologies, inquiry- or problem-based teaching techniques, or deeper learning strategies may result in some initial discomfort, these challenges can be overcome with robust support.

Support

A few workshops here and there rarely result in large-scale changes in implementation.

teacher-driven “unconferences” or “edcamps,” at which educators propose and facilitate discussion topics, can be powerful mechanisms for fostering professional dialogue and learning. Similarly, some schools offer voluntary “Tech Tuesdays” or “appy hours” to foster digital learning among interested faculty.

In addition to existing IT support, technology integration staff, or librarians/media specialists, some schools have student technology teams that are on call for assistance when needed.

A few middle schools and high schools go even further and assign teachers their own individual student technology mentors. These student-teacher pairings last all school year and comprise the first line of support for educators’ technology questions.

As teachers, heads of school, counselors, coaches, and librarians, we all now have the ability to participate in ongoing, virtual, global communities of practice.

Whether formal or informal, the focus of technology-related professional learning should be on student learning, not on the tools or devices. Independent school educators should always ask, “Technology for the purpose of what?” when considering the inclusion of digital technologies into learning activities. Technology never should be implemented just for technology’s sake.

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more on digital literacy for EDAD in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy+edad

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