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The Connections Between Computer Use and Learning Outcomes in Students

The Connections Between Computer Use and Learning Outcomes in Students

Last fall, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development published its first-ever, and one of the largest-ever, international analyses of student access to computers and how that relates to student learning. (The OECD administers the PISA test, the world-famous international academic ranking.)

“Students who use computers very frequently at school do a lot worse in most learning outcomes, even after controlling for social background and student demographics.”

In April, the research firm SRI published a report at the behest of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (which is a supporter of NPR Ed). It looked at college courses that are using so-called “adaptive learning” software as an enhancement to blended courses.

Finally, a study published in July looked at high-achieving eighth-graders across North Carolina who had the opportunity to take Algebra I online. The study found that they did much worse than students who took the course face-to-face — about a third of a letter grade worse, in fact.

Implementation is really important, yet it’s often ignored.

Imperfect data and inadequate evaluation make it hard to understand or improve the use of ed-tech.

Computers are enhancing access. There’s less evidence that they’re enhancing learning.

 

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more on the relationship between technology and learning in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+learning

IOLUG Fall 2016 Conference

IOLUG – Indiana Online Users Group

CALL FOR PROPOSALS
IOLUG Fall 2016 Conference – Let Our Powers Combine: Engage. Partner. Inspire

Friday, October 21, 2016

Indiana Wesleyan University North Campus
3777 Priority Way, Indianapolis, IN  46240

How can we join together to increase awareness of the value, impact and services provided by libraries and library professionals in the academic, public and online settings? The IOLUG Program Committee is inviting proposals around the theme of proving the value and worth of the library. Specifically, how are you demonstrating the value of your library? What emerging technologies are you using to display your contribution to your institution or community either online or in person? How can we work together to inspire a spirit of advocacy?

We encourage presentations that are practical, hands-on, and include take-awayable tools, techniques, and/or strategies that librarians can implement to improve their resources and services for students, patrons, faculty, etc. Consider the following topics:

  • Promoting open educational resources (OER) and affordable learning materials
  • Analytics and metrics
  • Supporting diversity
  • Improved service delivery and job performance
  • Digital media implementation
  • New library initiatives
  • Innovation and community engagement
  • Leadership

Please specify in your proposal whether users will be expected to bring their own devices, or if you will need the use of a computer lab.

Submit your proposal today!
Deadline is Friday, September 2
Get ideas from previous conferences at the IOLUG site.

gamification position

Tenure Track Position in Gamification Tampere University of Technology

http://www.computeroxy.com/announcement,a2945.html

Tampere University of Technology (TUT) is an active scientific community of 2,000 employees and more than 10,000 students. The University operates in the form of a foundation and has a long-standing tradition of collaboration with other research institutions and business life. Many of the fields of research and study represented at the University play a key role in addressing global challenges. Internationality is an inherent part of all the University’s activities. Welcome to join us at TUT!

The University of Turku is a world-class multidisciplinary research university which offers interesting challenges and a unique vantage point to national and international research and education.

Tenure track (Gamification)

The tenure track position is shared between Tampere University of Technology and the University of Turku. It supports the co-operation in teaching and research in the area of gamification between the two universities.

The professorship is especially associated with the TUT Game Lab (Pori Department, TUT) and the Digital Culture research group of the Cultural Production and Landscape Studies degree programme (School of History, Culture and Arts Studies, UTU). These research groups currently have five on-going research projects related to games and playing.

The TUT Game Lab brings together learning scientists, developers and humanists to conduct research and develop new ways of utilizing games in learning. The aim is to develop and study high-impact digital games that address real world challenges.

The main research objectives of TUT Game Lab are:
– Developing scientifically justified games to demonstrate and conduct research
– Studying the impact of educational games
– Exploring ways to combine learning and assessment in games
– Studying and modelling the playing experience

The Digital Culture research group (UTU) has three research focuses:
– cultural appropriation of technologies
– social media
– game cultures.

The Digital Culture research group specializes in the study of the cultural history of digital games and the uses of digital game histories in contemporary culture (so-called “history culture”). Furthermore, the research group has participated in various digital game exhibition projects as well as practical game design and gamification projects combining digital and non-digital elements. Digital Culture is a part of the Cultural Production and Landscape Studies degree programme which also incorporates two other major subjects: Cultural Heritage Studies and Landscape Studies.

Job description:

We invite applications for one (1) tenure track position in the area of Gamification.

The area of gamification covers:
– research of games and gamification
– games and playing as a cultural phenomenon
– game mechanisms, edugames and pervasive playing
– utilization of games in business, e.g. in new products and services

The emphasis of the position can be tailored according to the specific expertise of the candidate. Suitable educational and research backgrounds for the position include e.g. media studies, cultural studies, information technology and business and management.

The successful candidate is expected to:
– pursue and supervise scientific research in the field
– lead, conduct and develop education in the field
– participate in the activities of the national and international scientific communities
– acquire external funding
– interact with society
– commit to the strategies of TUT and UTU.

The successful candidate will participate in teaching both in the master’s degree programme in Management and Information Technology (TUT) as well as the subject of Digital Culture (UTU) by integrating the gamification theme into the existing course selection, in particular. Supervising theses and conducting doctoral seminars are also essential areas of responsibility.

The position will be filled at the level of Associate Professor.

The successful candidate will be employed by TUT. For more information on TUT’s tenure track career system, please refer to tut.fi/openpositions – Tenure track.

Requirements:

All candidates considered for a tenure track position are expected to:
– hold an applicable doctoral degree
– demonstrate a record of achievement in research that meets high international standards in the field of gamification
– demonstrate the capacity for independent scholarly activity
– possess the teaching skills required for the successful performance of their duties and
– have the ability to co-operate in a multidisciplinary university environment and with industry.

We appreciate experience and a track record in acquiring research funding, along with collaboration and leadership positions in research networks and industry.

For more information on the criteria for each level of TUT’s tenure track, please refer to tut.fi/openpositions – Tenure track.

We offer:

Both TUT and UTU have ambitious and challenging goals in effective, high-quality research, education and social influence. We offer an active research community with a good team spirit, intense cooperation with industry and business, public organizations and students, and opportunities for growth and advancement in academia. Our international cooperation is active and recognized, both in research and education.

We offer the successful candidate an opportunity to contribute to the creation of a new research area that combines gamification with areas such as cultural studies, information technology and business.

TUT offers a wide range of staff benefits, such as occupational health care. Since 2014, TUT has held the European Commission HR Excellence in Research recognition.

For more information, please visit tut.fi/en – About TUT – Careers at TUT
(http://www.tut.fi/en/about-tut/careers-at-tut/index.htm)
(http://www.tut.fi/en/about-tut/quality-assurance/hr-excellence-in-research)

Salary:

The salary will be based on both the job demands and the employee’s personal performance in accordance with the Finnish University Salary System (YPJ).

The advertised position is typically placed on the job demand level 7 (Associate Professor). In addition, the employees receive performance-based salary and they are covered by TUT’s bonus system.

Trial period:

The appointment is subject to the satisfactory completion of a trial period of four months.

Other:

The position will be filled for a fixed-term period of four years. The appointment is expected to begin on 1 December 2016 or as mutually agreed.

The duties are mainly located on the Pori campus in close co-operation with the main campuses in Tampere and Turku.

For the candidates with the most potential for the position, the selection process will involve an external assessment, individual interviews, aptitude assessments and a trial lecture.

For more information, please contact:

Director of University Consortium of Pori, Professor Jari Multisilta, e-mail: jari.multisilta@tut.fi, tel. +358 40 826 2910. Best availability for enquiries: 7 July–15 July and 1 August- 10 August.

In questions concerning the recruitment process, please contact HR Specialist
Eveliina Nurmi, e-mail. eveliina.nurmi@tut.fi, tel. +358 50 3015253. Best availability for enquiries: 15 June – 8 July and 8 August-10 August.

How to apply:

Applications must be submitted through TUT’s online employment system. The closing date for applications is 10 August 2016 (10:00 pm UTC). All applications and supporting documents must be submitted in English.

The applications must include the following documents prepared according to TUT’s instructions:
1. Curriculum Vitae (.doc or .pdf)
2. Research plan
3. List of publications
4. Teaching portfolio
5. References

Additional information on TUT’s tenure track system and attachments to applications.

Softchalk for MnSCU

training session 10:30AM July 7

firefox is preferable to chrome and IE

in chrome, audio plays automatically. if students are using Chromes, need to have the audio file on the top, so students can stop it. NAPI is not supported by Google. So Softchalk must start local launch.

this is SO complex and SO many side steps that it will be a miracle to get the middle 50-60% of faculty into buying the SoftChalk idea.

local launch is client based and allows creating content without Internet connection

edit in Create Online allows creation on mobile devices such as tablet

have to have rights on the computer to install the local launch. Ha…

I am behind David, since my java is not up to date. i have to update now that. I wonder how many faculty will endure the initial process

Microsoft Edge is different the IE, but will act the same

SoftChalk is the same elitist ideas as LMS. It will require an extensive training of faculty, which they have no time and energy to invest in. The idea of Learning Objects will require years of compiling materials, sufficiently enough to be recycled by other faculty. In most disciplines, these learning objects will age by the time they reach the critical mass.

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training session 1PM July 6, 2016

David Evans  from SoftChalk is doing the training session.

If we want to share with students, do they have to have a user account in softchalk?
Аnswer: No. The instructor can share the content by embedding the URL to the Softchalk content, but not allow students to participate in the creation
the answer defies the constructivist principles of learning

MnSCU site Educational Innovations -> MnSCU SoftChalk Pilot
http://www.asa.mnscu.edu/educationalinnovations/projects/SoftChalk_Cloud/educational-innovations-page.html

  1. Part 1: Trainer David Evans – SoftChalk’s cloud management (creating lessons, folders, sharing, uploading files and more) – 1 hour 5 min

https://mnscu.webex.com/mnscu/ldr.php?RCID=b15902c4eb57cfcbfc6559b4f2e4bcf7

  1. Part 2: – 21 min https://mnscu.webex.com/mnscu/ldr.php?RCID=2e0612ead1c04836ab614ebafe4607ed
    1. Lesley Blicker – MnSCU’s pilot project and web resources (7 min)
    2. Jon Werth – integrating SoftChalk with the D2L Brightspace gradebook, plus browsers to use or avoid

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MnSCU pilot. How to do the LT integration for the gradebook, including browsers constrains.

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SoftChalk Session for CSAs and CTs

Java applet is essential, until HMTL5 is functional. IT and the System Office have things locked down and not much can be done. Java Application cannot be blocked.

http://asa.mnscu.edu/educationalinnovations/projects/SoftChalk_Cloud/educational-innovations-page.html

Integrating Softchalk Cloud w D2L. SCORM – don’t use it. Tool Provider.

SoftChalk (SC) can be used as an external link within D2L, internal integration only when used with the gradebook. The LTI link is ONLY needed if the instructor plans to use the gradebook. Otherwise, it’s a simple embed in content.

if recently installed Java 8.91, will not install the jar file and one have to go and manually delete it.

Browsers.

Firefox and IE will allow to launch the Java applet. Chrome and Safari will block it. it will require a local launch. The install will create an icon in the lower right corner.

I cannot believe such structure, in the times of drag and drop. Whoever came up w it, is DEFINITELY not a faculty and does not care about faculty time and effort.

the process is lengthy and cumbersome, not to mentioned repetitive. If this work is shifted toward faculty, i seriously doubt that the adoption rate will be in the double digits.

verdict: much ado about nothing: the work that faculty have to put toward such content versus the return on the Bloom’s taxonomy scale is so low that in my opinion is just squandering of efforts. If there is a LOR, where faculty can draw preset clusters of similar activities, I would be more willing to accept.

a license for SoftChalk Cloud is needed. Who is in charge of this? John and TLTR? Tom as faculty president?

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more on Softchalk in this IMS blog

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=softchalk

instructional designers and tech adoption

Survey: Instructional Designers ‘Pivotal’ in Tech Adoption

By Dian Schaffhauser 05/09/16

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2016/05/09/survey-instructional-designers-pivotal-in-tech-adoption.aspx

Managing projects is the most common task instructional designers undertake during their days, followed by technology and pedagogical training. Their biggest obstacle to success on the job is faculty resistance. The most important expertise they possess as a whole is the ability to learn new technologies, followed by project management and learning science or theory. Their favorite tools to work with are Camtasia and Adobe products; their least-favorite are Blackboard and learning management systems in general.

  • Consider adding more resources in the area of instructional design. If that isn’t possible, at least consider involving instructional designers “early” and “often” during technology transitions.”
  • “Incentivize” faculty to work with instructional designers “from the get-go” in order to help them learn how to engage with their students and expand class time through the use of online tools.
  • Technology providers should work closely with instructional designers in the selection of digital tools.

The report, “Instructional Design in Higher Education,” is freely available on the Intentional Futures website here.

Instructional Design in Higher Education

http://intentionalfutures.com/reports/instructional_design/

p. 4 Graph: median number of instructional designers by type of institution. According to the graph, SCSU must have between 3 and 16 instructional designers.

p. 10.“While a ‘jack-of-all-trades’ can get by in instructional design, the best instructional designers are ‘aces-of-many-trades’,with authentic experience and training in all aspects of the process.”

p. 12“Management choose[s] tools that are cheap and never ask[s] about integration or accessibility.Then we spend enormous amounts of time trying to get them to work.”

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more in this IMS blog on instructional design

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=instructional

gen z coming to campus

Survey: What Gen Z Thinks About Ed Tech in College

A report on digital natives sheds light on their learning preferences.
Like the millennials before them, Generation Z grew up as digital natives, with devices a fixture in the learning experience. According to the survey results, these students want “engaging, interactive learning experiences” and want to be “empowered to make their own decisions.” In addition, the students “expect technology to play an instrumental role in their educational experience.”
to cater to the digital appetites of tomorrow’s higher education learners, technology in education will need to play a bit of catch-up, states the New Media Consortium’s 2015 Course Apps report. According to NMC’s analysts, digital-textbook adoption was one of the leading trends helping to reinvent how higher education students learn. But publishers have not captured the innovations happening elsewhere in the digital marketplace.

The Generation Z report ranked the effectiveness of 11 education technology tools:

  1. Smartboards
  2. Do-It-Yourself Learning
  3. Digital Textbooks
  4. Websites with Study Materials
  5. Online Videos
  6. Game-Based Learning Systems
  7. Textbook
  8. Social Media
  9. Skype
  10. Podcasts
  11. DVD/Movies
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more on Gen Z in this blog:

Generation Z bibliography

 

proctoring

Clemson University’s Centralized Proctoring Story

http://marketing.softwaresecure.com/acton/fs/blocks/showLandingPage/a/10395/p/p-002f/t/page/fm/0

e-Campus news offers a proctoring model: http://www.ecampusnews.com/whitepapers/5-step-guide-to-how-clemson-university-online-is-centralizing-online-proctoring/ conveniently presented in a 5-step outline, webinar and “case study” paper.

According to them, you just “Follow their story and learn how the team at Clemson Online implemented RPNow, and how they’re planning to centralize remote proctoring to increase student convenience, faculty efficiency and reduce the costs of exam administration.”

It is, of course, sponsored by the company, who will be paid for the proctoring
http://www.softwaresecure.com/product/remote-proctor-now/

Here are my issues with the proposal:

  1. step 5 of the five-step outline: “Take control of the payment model. Institutional payment (as opposed to student pay) creates a better experience for the student and cost savings for all.”
    so, if the institution pays, then student don’t pay? I find this and illusion, since the institution pays by using students’ tuition. which constantly grows. so, the statement is rather deceptive.
  2. As with the huge controversy around Turnitin (e.g., this 2009 article, and this 2012 article), “mechanizing” the very humane process evaluation is outright wrong. The attempt to compensate the lack of sufficient number of faculty by “outsourcing” to machines is en vogue with the nationwide strive of higher ed administration to create an “assembly line” type of education, which makes profit, but it is dubious if it teaches [well].
  3. Pedagogically (as per numerous discussions in the Chronicle of Higher Education and similar sources), if the teaching materials and exams are structured in an engaging way, students cheat much less. The “case study” paper claims reduction of cheating, but it is reduction based on fear to be caught, not based on genuine interest in learning.

 

REP in digital citizenship

Digital citizenship is more important than ever

By Mike Ribble 9/15/2015

R is for respect yourself and others. 

Etiquette. Students need to understand how their technology use affects others. Remind them that there is a person on the other end of their text, tweet, comment or post.

Access. Not everyone has the same opportunities with technology, whether the issue is  physical, socio-economic or location. Those who have more access to technology need to help those who don’t.

Law. The ease of using online tools has allowed some people to steal, harass and cause problems for others online. Students need to know they can’t take content without permission, or at least give credit to those who created it.

E is for educating yourself and others. 

Literacy. Learning happens everywhere. Regardless of whether we get our information from friends, family or online, we need to be aware that it might not be correct. Students need to understand technology and what it can do and be willing to learn new skills so they can use it properly.

Communication. Knowing when and where to use technology is important. Using email, text or social media may not be the best method for interacting with someone. Students need to think about the message first, then the method, and decide if the manner and audience is appropriate.

Commerce. Technology allows us to buy and sell across the globe. Students should be careful about sharing personal and credit card information. Online commerce comes with risks.

P is for protecting yourself and others.

Rights and responsibilities. Build trust so that if something happens online, students are willing to share their problems or concerns about what has happened. Students should know who they are friends with on social networking sites so that they can remain safe online.

Security. It is everyone’s responsibility to guard their tools and data by having software and applications that protect them from online intruders. When we are all connected, everyone is responsible for security.

Health and wellness. There needs to be a balance between the online world and the real world. Students should establish limits with technology and spend quality face-to-face time with friends and family.

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More on digital citizenship in this blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+citizenship

global education leadership

Global Leadership Week Next Week

April 25 – 29, 2016

Global Leadership Week (GLW) is a week-long celebration of leadership through global action in K-20 education, taking place April 25 – 29, 2016, and organized by the Global Education Conference (GEC) Network. GLW is an opportunity for global education leaders (and those who want to be!) to learn from one another and share effective principles in leadership, particularly within the context of an interconnected, global age.

During Global Leadership Week, leaders in schools, universities, non-profit organizations, and corporations have designed and will be hosting over 25 virtual events to showcase thought leadership. The global education community at large can choose to participate in these online activities by browsing event listings on the GLW calendarAll events are free of charge to attend.

You can participate actively in these events by posting comments and ideas to Twitter using the hashtag #globaled16. Global Leadership Week discussions are also being hosted in a new Edmodo feature called Topics. You’ll need a free Edmodo account to participate and we encourage you to respond to the prompts on this page: https://www.edmodo.com/topics/609/2016-Global-Leadership-Week. Also, feel free to add yourself to the participant map.

AND it’s still not too late to design and host a virtual event focused on global education leadership next week. We will post your event on our website’s calendar. If your organization is a sponsor or a non-profit, we will promote your event through social media. Submit to host an event here. And while time is short, if your organization can reach several thousand educators, consider joining us as an outreach partner. Email Lucy Gray at lucy@globaledevents.com. Include a short description of how you can help get the word out to your network and a logo for your organization.

This event is brought to you by people and organizations who believe in the power of globally connected teaching and learning. GLW is organized by the Global Education Conference Network, Flat Connections, GlobalEdLeader, Global Oneness Project, iEARN-USA, the Learning Revolution Project, and VIF International Education.

digital literacy

Laura Devaney (@eSN_Laura).  4/12/16, 9:32 AM This is exactly why we need digital literacy: ow.ly/10zJeD #DigitalLiteracy #assessments #edtech

Online Testing Highlights the Need for Digital Literacy

Online Testing Highlights the Need for Digital Literacy

Daily Exposure to Digital Devices

the Consortium for School Networking’s “Becoming Assessment Ready” initiative

Because online exams require students to have functional literacy with computing devices, such as switching between screens, opening drop-down menus and highlighting words, students should be using technology in their day-to-day classroom experience so they are building these digital literacy skills, he explains.

“The more often students use digital devices in their day-to-day learning, the more comfortable with those devices they become,” says Ribble, who has written a book about digital literacy and citizenship for the International Society for Technology in Education.

Younger Students Perform Better in Online Formats

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More on digital literacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

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