Searching for "digital assessment literacy"

digital assessment literacy

Eyal, L. (2012). Digital Assessment Literacy — the Core Role of the Teacher in a Digital Environment. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 15(2), 37-49.

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Common to all is a view of the level of literacy as a measure of the quality of human capital of a society or a particular area. Literacy develops in interaction with the environment (Vygotsky, 1987).

digital assessment literacy refers to the role of the teacher as an assessor in a technology-rich environment.

Learning Management Systems (LMS) benefits and limitations

Measurement allows quantitative description of a particular characterization of an individual, expressed in numbers.

the combination of assessment and measurement provides a thorough and accurate picture, based upon which practical conclusions can be drawn (Wagner, 1997). A test is a systematic process in which an aspect of student behavior is quantitatively evaluated (Suen & Parkes, 2002).

For several decades this system of assessment has been criticized for a variety of reasons, including the separation between the teaching-learning process and the evaluation process, the relatively low level of thinking required, and the quantitative reporting of results, which does not contribute to students’ progress. In the last decade, the central argument against the tests system is that their predictability is limited to the field and context in which the students are tested, and that they do not predict student problem solving ability, teamwork, good work habits and honesty.

teachers mistakenly believe that repeating lessons will improve students’ achievements.

To evaluate how well the goals were achieved, objective measurement methods are employed (Black, et al., 2004).

Eshet- Alkalai (2004) offered a detailed conceptual framework for the term ‘digital literacy’ that includes: photo-visual thinking; reproduction thinking; branching thinking; information thinking; and socio-emotional thinking.

Eshet-Alkalai, Y. (2004). Digital literacy: A conceptual framework for survival skills in the digital era. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 13(1), 93–106.

Eshet-Alkalai, Y., & Chajut, E. (2009). Changes Over Time in Digital Literacy. Cyberpsychology & Behavior, 12(6), 713-715. doi:10.1089/cpb.2008.0264

two major patterns of change over time: (a) closing the gap between younger and older participants in the tasks that emphasize profi- ciency and technical control and (b) widening the gap between younger and older participants in tasks that emphasize creativity and critical thinking. Based on the comparison with the matched control groups, we suggest that experience with technology, and not age, accounts for the observed lifelong changes in digital literacy skills

Eshet-Alkalai, Y., & Soffer, O. (2012). Guest Editorial – Navigating in the Digital Era: Digital Literacy: Socio-Cultural and Educational Aspects. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 15(2), 1.

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a wide range of technological, cognitive and social competences—collectively termed “Digital Literacy.” Users thus must become “digitally literate” in order to cope effectively with the complex sociological, cognitive and pedagogical challenges these technologies pose. These skills include, for example, the ability to operate computers and navigate the net effectively, to cope with large volumes of information, to evaluate the reliability of information, and to critically assess what seem to be natural (and not ideologically biased) technological tools. In a different way from the spirit of modern print, learners construct and consume knowledge in non-linear environments. They need to learn, collaborate and solve problems effectively in virtual (non face-to-face) learning environments, and to communicate effectively in technology-mediated social participation environments.

It is important to note: digital literacy, then, is not limited simply to computer and Internet operation and orientation. It also relates to a variety of epistemological and ethical issues arise due to the unique characteristics of digital technologies and that are often overlapped with trends related to the post-modern and post-structural era. These include questions regarding the authority of knowledge, intellectual property and ownership, copyright, authenticity and plagiarism. Furthermore, issues such as self-representation, virtual group dynamics, and on-line addiction also arise.

 

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+assessment+literacy

Western Balkans Information & Media Literacy Conference

Western Balkans Information & Media Literacy Conference

organized by LIT Limerick Institute of Technology, Ireland; Bihac, Bosnia

Conference main themes and topics https://www.wbimlc.org/topics

Information Literacy in the modern world

  • From Information Literacy to Digital Scholarship

  • Fake News and Information Literacy

  • Information literacies (media literacy, Research Literacy, digital literacy, visual literacy, financial literacy, health literacy, cyber wellness, infographics, information behavior, trans-literacy, post-literacy)

  • Information Literacy and academic libraries

  • Information Literacy and adult education

  • Information Literacy and blended learning

  • Information Literacy and distance learning

  • Information Literacy and mobile devices

  • Information Literacy and Gamification

  • Information Literacy and public libraries

  • Information Literacy in Primary and Secondary Schools

  • Information Literacy and the Knowledge Economy

  • Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning

  • Information Literacy and the Information Society

  • Information Literacy and the Multimedia Society

  • Information Literacy and the Digital Society

  • Information Literacy in the modern world (e.g trends, emerging technologies and innovation, growth of digital resources, digital reference tools, reference services).

  • The future of Information Literacy

  • Workplace Information Literacy

Librarians as support to the lifelong learning process

  • Digital literacy, Digital Citizenship

  • Digital pedagogy and Information Literacy

  • Information Literacy Needs in the Electronic Resource Environment

  • Integrating Information Literacy into the curriculum

  • Putting Information Literacy theory into practice

  • Information Literacy training and instruction

  • Instructional design and performance for Information Literacy (e.g. teaching practice, session design, lesson plans)

  •  Information Literacy and online learning (e.g. self-paced IL modules, online courses, Library Guides)

  • Information Literacy and Virtual Learning Environments

  • Supporting users need through library 2.0 and beyond

  • Digital empowerment and reference work

  • Information Literacy across the disciplines

  • Information Literacy and digital preservation

  • Innovative IL approaches

  • Student engagement with Information Literacy

  • Action Literacy

  • Information Literacy, Copyright and Intellectual Property

  • Information Literacy and Academic Writing

Media and Information Literacy – theoretical approaches (standards, assessment, collaboration, etc.)

  • The Digital Competence Framework 2.0

  • Information Literacy theory (models, standards, indicators, Moscow Declaration etc.)

  • Information Literacy and Artificial intelligence

  • Information Literacy and information behavior

  • Information Literacy and reference services: cyber reference services, virtual reference services, mobile reference services

  • Information Literacy cultural and contextual approaches

  • Information Literacy and Threshold concepts

  • Information Literacy evaluation and assessment

  • Information Literacy in different cultures and countries including national studies

  • Information Literacy project management

  • Measuring in Information Literacy instruction assessment

New aspects of education/strategic planning, policy, and advocacy for Information Literacy in a digital age

  • Information Literacy and the Digital Divide

  • Policy and Planning for Information Literacy

  • Branding, promotion and marketing for Information Literacy

  • Cross –sectorial; and interdisciplinary collaboration and partnerships for Information Literacy

  • Leadership and Governance for Information Literacy

  • Strategic planning for IL

  • Strategies in e-learning to promote self-directed and sustainable learning in the area of Information Literacy skills.

digital agility

Digital Agility: Embracing a Holistic Approach to Digital Literacy in the Liberal Arts

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2020/1/digital-agility-embracing-a-holistic-approach-to-digital-literacy-in-the-liberal-arts

A 2016 Pew Research Center study indicates that the digital divide in the United States is not solely about access to technology; it also is about the ability to use technology to get what we need.1 What does digital readiness mean; applying cumulative knowledge to real-world situations. Having a tech or STEM-related degree does not ensure digital readiness.

How Can We Encourage Digital Agility in the Liberal Arts?

Digital pedagogy often creates opportunities for instructors to create non-disposable assignments—assignments that are not designed to be thrown away but rather have a purpose past being required.3

“We need to marry the best of our academic work with the best of edtech. In other words, what would it look like if education technology were embedded in the everyday practice of academic disciplines?”4

Project-based learning fits well within the curricular flexibility of the liberal arts. In project-based work, students apply what they are learning in the context of an engaging experience.

Building off frameworks that are already in place, like the Association for College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Framework for Information Literacy,

External-facing work offers students real situations where, if we imagine what digital agility looks like, they have to adjust to possible new digital environments and approaches.

Reflection provides a way for meaning-making to happen across individual assignments, projects, and classes. Without the chance to assemble assignments into a larger narrative, each experience lives in its own void.

How Can Institutions Build Systems-Level Support?

Liberal arts colleges in particular are interested in the ways they prepare graduates to be agile and critical in a digital world—as seen in the Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U) Valid Assessment of Learning in Undergraduate Education (VALUE) Rubrics.

he Bryn Mawr Digital Competencies Framework5 was followed by more formal conversations and the formation of a working group (including Carleton College,

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more on digital fluency in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+fluency

K12 media literacy

Report: Florida, Ohio called ‘advanced leaders’ in K-12 media literacy efforts

Advocacy group Media Literacy Now says 14 states have laws with “some media-literacy language” and others will consider bills this year, but some say progress “is too slow.”

https://www.educationdive.com/news/report-florida-ohio-called-advanced-leaders-in-k-12-media-literacy-effo/569879/

Erin McNeill, president and board member of Media Literacy Now

Media Literacy Now considers digital citizenship as part of media literacy — not the other way around

nine states — California, Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Utah — are identified as “emerging leaders” for “beginning the conversation” and consulting with experts and others.

Calls for increased attention to media literacy skills and demand from educators for training in this area increased following an outbreak of “fake news” reports associated with the 2016 presidential election. Studies and assessments showing students are easily misled by digital information have also contributed to a sense of urgency.

because the topic can fit into multiple content areas, it can also be overlooked because of other pressures on teachers. Media literacy, the group notes, also “encompasses the foundational skills of digital citizenship and internet safety including the norms of appropriate, responsible, ethical, and healthy behavior, and cyberbullying prevention.”

Lawmakers in Missouri and South Carolina have also pre-filed versions of Media Literacy Now’s model bill, the report noted, and legislation is expected in Hawaii and Arizona.

the News Literacy Project and the Center for New Literacy’s summer academy.

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more on media literacy in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=media+literacy

digital literacy ENGL 101

English 101 materials for discussion on digital literacy.

Jamie Heiman.

All materials on #DigitalLiteracy in the IMS blog here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Scenario for digital literacy in English classes:

What do virtual reality, BuzzFeed quizzes and essay writing have in common?

https://www.educationdive.com/news/what-do-virtual-reality-buzzfeed-quizzes-and-essay-writing-have-in-common/527868/

July 18, 2018

high school students now create infographics, BuzzFeed-like quizzes and even virtual reality (VR) experiences to illustrate how they can research, write and express their thoughts.

technology — using sites like CoSpaces Edu and content learning system Schoology (my note: the equivalnet of D2L at SCSU) — to engage and empower her students.

Thinklink, during a session called “Virtually Not an Essay: Technological Alternatives to a standard essay assignment.” (see this blog materials on ThingLink and like here: https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=thinglink. The author made typo by calling the app “ThinKlink, instead of ThinGlink. Also, to use Thinglink’s Video 360 editor, the free account is not sufficient and the $125/month upgrade is needed. Not a good solution for education)

Jamie: I would love to discuss with you #infographics and #Thinglink for use in your courses and the Departmental course.

Digital literacy (DL): options, ideas, possibilities

digital assessment session for SCSU faculty

please consider the following opportunities:

  1. Remote attendance through : https://webmeeting.minnstate.edu/collaborate
  2. Recording of the session: (URL will be shared after the session)
  3. Request a follow up meeting for your individual project: https://doodle.com/digitalliteracy

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more on digital assessment in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=edpuzzle

NMC on digital literacy

NMC Releases Horizon Project Strategic Brief on Digital Literacy

Anaheim, California (October 25, 2016) — The New Media Consortium (NMC) has released Digital Literacy: An NMC Horizon Project Strategic Brief in conjunction with the 2016 EDUCAUSE Annual Conference.

This project was launched because there is a lack of consensus across the field about how to define digital literacy and implement effective programs. A survey was disseminated throughout the NMC community of higher education leaders and practitioners to understand how digital literacy initiatives are impacting their campuses. The NMC’s research examines the current landscape to illuminate multiple models of digital literacy — universal literacy, creative literacy, and literacy across disciplines — around which dedicated programs can proliferate a spectrum of skills and competencies.

p. 8-10 examples across US universities on digital literacy organization

p. 12 Where does support for digital literacy come from your institution? Individual people

nmc-definition-of-digital-literacy

p. 13. campus libraries must be deeply embedded in course curriculum. While libraries have always supported academic institutions, librarians can play a more critical role in the development of digital literacy skills. Historically, these types of programs have been implemented in “one-off” segments, which are experienced apart from a student’s normal studies and often delivered in a one-size-fits-all method. However, an increasing number of academic libraries are supporting a more integrated approach that delivers continuous skill development and assessment over time to both students and faculty. This requires deeper involvement with departments and agreeing on common definitions of what capacities should be achieved, and the most effective pedagogical method. Librarians are tasked with broadening their role in the co-design of curriculum and improving their instruction techniques to work alongside faculty toward the common goal of training students to be savvy digital researchers. University of Arizona Libraries, for example, found that a key step in this transition required collaborating on a common instructional philosophy.

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more on digital literacy in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

Save

digital literacy

Laura Devaney (@eSN_Laura).  4/12/16, 9:32 AM This is exactly why we need digital literacy: ow.ly/10zJeD #DigitalLiteracy #assessments #edtech

Online Testing Highlights the Need for Digital Literacy

Online Testing Highlights the Need for Digital Literacy

Daily Exposure to Digital Devices

the Consortium for School Networking’s “Becoming Assessment Ready” initiative

Because online exams require students to have functional literacy with computing devices, such as switching between screens, opening drop-down menus and highlighting words, students should be using technology in their day-to-day classroom experience so they are building these digital literacy skills, he explains.

“The more often students use digital devices in their day-to-day learning, the more comfortable with those devices they become,” says Ribble, who has written a book about digital literacy and citizenship for the International Society for Technology in Education.

Younger Students Perform Better in Online Formats

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More on digital literacy in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digital+literacy

digital badges in education

Digital Badges in Education: Trends, Issues, and Cases.

https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138857605

In recent years, digital badging systems have become a credible means through which learners can establish portfolios and articulate knowledge and skills for both academic and professional settings. Digital Badges in Education provides the first comprehensive overview of this emerging tool. A digital badge is an online-based visual representation that uses detailed metadata to signify learners’ specific achievements and credentials in a variety of subjects across K-12 classrooms, higher education, and workplace learning. Focusing on learning design, assessment, and concrete cases in various contexts, this book explores the necessary components of badging systems, their functions and value, and the possible problems they face. These twenty-five chapters illustrate a range of successful applications of digital badges to address a broad spectrum of learning challenges and to help readers formulate solutions during the development of their digital badges learning projects.

digital badges

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Badges and Leaderboards: Professional Developments for Teachers in K12

digital badges

http://www.shakeuplearning.com/blog/more-ideas-for-badges-in-professional-learning/

Why should I bother earning badges?

http://www.connectededucators.org/cem-digital-badges-faq/

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Canvas Badges:

https://canvas.instructure.com/courses/904071

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Edmodo Badges:

http://www.helloliteracy.com/2012/09/technologically-speaking-currently.html

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issues to consider:

digital badges: issues to consider

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More on badges and gaming in education in this IMS blog:

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/?s=badges&submit=Search

Media and Technology Literacy and Skills: May 10 workshop offered…

A a workshop for COLL 150 and HONS 100 instructors on May 10.

Here is the outline and resources.

Media Literacy and Skills

Media Literacy (according to Wikipedia — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_literacy)

The term has been conceived in many different ways and across all academic departments (Mihalidis, 2008).

Media literacy is central in a broader concept of access (Sourbati, 2009).

The relationship between visual competencies and the notion of media literacy have not been fully explored or adequately specified (Griffin, 2008).

Media literacy interventions refer to education programs designed to reduce harmful effects of the media by informing the audience about one or more aspects of the media, thereby influencing media-related beliefs and attitudes, and ultimately preventing risky behaviors.  Positive effects of media literacy interventions were observed across diverse agents, target age groups, settings, topics, and countries (Jeong et al, 2012).

Media literacy, information literacy and digital literacy are the three most prevailing concepts that focus on a critical approach towards media messages

The 21st century has marked an unprecedented advancement of new media. New media has become so pervasive that it has penetrated into every aspect of our society. New media literacy plays an essential role for any citizen to participate fully in the 21st century society. Researchers have documented that literacy has evolved historically from classic literacy (reading-writing-understanding) to audiovisual literacy to digital literacy or information literacy and recently to new media literacy. A review of literature on media literacy reveals that there is a lack of thorough analysis of unique characteristics of newmedia and its impacts upon the notion of new media literacy. The purpose of the study is to unpack new media literacyand propose a framework for a systematic investigation of new media literacy

Hobbs versus Potter

Media Skills

Ten basic new media skills that today’s journalist should know: http://www.siliconvalleywatcher.com/mt/archives/2008/03/ten_basic_new_m.php

  • HTML is not dead. QR codes are only one new technology, which can revive it. But:
  • WordPress might be preferable to Adobe Dreamweaver.
  • PPT is not enough. Prezi does not replace it. Then what? Desktop/lpatop versus tablet (Stampsy). Or the Cloud m(VoiceThread)? Does Media skills = presentation skills?
  • iMovie | Movie Maker (local) versus YouTube (Cloud)
  • Flickr (Cloud) versus Photoshop (local).

Sources:

Mihailidis, P. (2008). Are We Speaking the Same Language? Assessing the State of Media Literacy in U.S. Higher Education. Simile8(4), 1-14. doi:10.3138/sim.8.4.001 http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=40303609

Hobbs, R. (2011). EMPOWERING LEARNERS WITH DIGITAL AND MEDIA LITERACY. Knowledge Quest39(5), 12-17. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=61819923

http://www.knightcomm.org/digital-and-media-literacy-a-plan-of-action/

Koltay, T. (2011). The media and the literacies: media literacy, information literacy, digital literacy. Media, Culture & Society33(2), 211-221. doi:10.1177/0163443710393382  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=59569702

“Victor” CHEN, D., WU, J., & WANG, Y. (2011). Unpacking New Media Literacy. Journal Of Systemics, Cybernetics & Informatics9(2), 84-88. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=83259046

Sourbati, M. (2009). Media Literacy and Universal Access in Europe. Information Society25(4), 248-254. doi:10.1080/01972240903028680  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=43050924

GRIFFIN, M. (2008). Visual competence and media literacy: can one exist without the other?. Visual Studies,23(2), 113-129. doi:10.1080/14725860802276255  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=33944793

Jeong, S., Cho, H., & Hwang, Y. (2012). Media Literacy Interventions: A Meta-Analytic Review. Journal Of Communication62(3), 454-472. doi:10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01643.x http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=76349359

Yates, B. L. (2002). Media education’s present and future: A survey of teachers. Simile2(3), N.PAG. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=10537377

Technology Literacy and Skills

Technology Literacy

definition:

consider this: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/chri1010/TLI/023958.html

Technology Literacy is the ability to responsibly use appropriate technology to communicate, solve problems, and access, manage, integrate, evaluate, and create information to improve learning in all subject areas and to acquire lifelong knowledge and skills in the 21st century.

http://www.coloradotechliteracy.org/org/documentation/module1/definition.htm
http://www.setda.org/toolkit/nlitoolkit/tla/tla02.htm 

Technology literacy is the ability of an individual, working independently and with others, to responsibly, appropriately and effectively use technology tools to access, manage, integrate, evaluate, create and communicate information.

http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/departments/techlit/docs/Definition%20of%20Technology%20Literacy.pdf

“Technological Literacy is the ability to use, manage, assess, and understand technology” (Gallop Poll, 2004, p. 1). “Technological literacy encompasses three interdependent dimensions: (1) knowledge, (2) ways of thinking and acting; and (3) capabilities” (Technically Speaking, 2006, p.1).

http://cms.bsu.edu/-/media/WWW/DepartmentalContent/Senate/AgendasMinutes/200708/techlit2.pdf

Comprehension of technological innovation and the impact of technology on society — may include the ability to select and use specific innovations appropriate to one’s interests and needs.

http://www.education.com/definition/technological-literacy/

Technological Literacy Reconsidered: http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v4n2/waetjen.jte-v4n2.html

ICT literacy, which is increasingly referred to as the fourth literacy, is neither as well defined nor as readily assessed as reading, writing, and arithmetic (Mirray and Perez, 2010).

The importance for the public and educators to be proficienttechnology users since technology literacy is one of the important skills in the 21st century (Eisenberg et al, 2010).

Technology literacy is hampered by well-intentioned educators who are trying to develop checklists and tests (Miners, 2007).

Technology Skills:

Sources:

http://www.p21.org/overview/skills-framework/350

Pérez, J., & Murray, M. (2010). Generativity: The New Frontier for Information and Communication Technology Literacy. Interdisciplinary Journal Of Information, Knowledge & Management5127-137.  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=58079824

Eisenberg, M., Johnson, D., & Berkowitz, B. (2010). Information, Communications, and Technology (ICT) Skills Curriculum Based on the Big6 Skills Approach to Information Problem-Solving. Library Media Connection28(6), 24-27. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=50728714

Miners, Z., & Pascopella, A. (2007). The NEW Literacies. District Administration43(10), 26-34. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=27024204

NAEP Will Include Technology Literacy in 2012. (Cover story). (2008). Electronic Education Report15(20), 1-7.  http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=62828392

Heller-Ross, H. (2004). Reinforcing information and technology literacy. College & Research Libraries News65(6), 321-325. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=13541089

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Do you have ideas and materials regarding Media and Technology Literacy and Skills? Pls contribute…

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