Searching for "screencast"

Screencast O Matic

My Favorite Screencasting Tool Now Works on Chromebooks

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2018/02/my-favorite-screencasting-tool-now.html

There is a free version and a paid “pro” version of Screencast-o-Matic. The free version will let you record for up to 15 minutes, record as many videos as you like, save to your Google Drive or local drive, and use your webcam while recording a screencast. The pro version removes the time limit, removes the Screencast-o-Matic watermark, enables cursor highlighting (that yellow circle you see on my screencast videos), enables drawing tools, and enables access to the offline editor.

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more on screen capture and screencast in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=screencast

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

Loom screencast

Loom – Screencast on Chromebooks, Macs, and PCs

https://www.useloom.com/

http://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/09/loom-screencast-on-chromebooks-macs-and.html

Loom – Screencast on Chromebooks, Macs, and PCshttp://www.freetech4teachers.com/2017/09/loom-screencast-on-chromebooks-macs-and.html

Posted by Free Technology for Teachers on Friday, September 1, 2017

Please share your impressions and comparisons to the MnSCU available MediaSpace (AKA Kaltura):

https://idpstarid.mnscu.edu/idp/Authn/UserPassword

https://scsu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/

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more on lecture capture in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=lecture+capture

“whiteboard screencasting” and “lecture capture” apps: please enter your choices and suggestions

Greg Jorgensen emailed us with his new darling:

Explain Everything – https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.morriscooke.explaineverything

and raises a very good question:

What do we know and how do we organize our tools and apps for whiteboard screencasting and lecture capture?

Screencasting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-learning#Screencasting

Screencast
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screencast

Greg’s choice of the day is atop of a list from the Ed Tech/y and Mobile Learning web site:
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/6-useful-ipad-apps-for-creating.html

next on that top-6-list are

Teach

Show Me

Educreations Interactive Whiteboard

Doodlecast Pro

Pixntell

Doceri (http://doceri.com/) is a very promissing app, which Bob Lessinger was pushing to be installed on campuos computers (being free), but it is ONLY iPAD-bound (not even iPHone or iTouch)
In addition to Doceri: Stage : Interactive Whiteboard and Document Camera and Splashtop Whiteboard per: 3 Apps to Turn Your iPad into Interactive Whiteboard ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Here is a neat table about the compatibility (iOS and Android) for several of these apps:
http://www.elcamino.edu/administration/staffdev/training/whiteboardscreencasting.pdf

Here is another good resource from Alaska. The screencasting apps reviewed are the same as above, but other good sources regarding a pedagogy involving the technology.

A broader approach to this issue (Presentation & Screencasting Apps) on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/itechservices/presentation-screencasting-apps/

More apps and possibilities, as well as “how-to” directions here:
http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com/2011/06/07/how-i-make-screencasts-the-whiteboard-screencast/

Here is an useful blog entry, comparing  ExlpainEverything with Educreation —
http://freebiologyschool.blogspot.com/2013/04/explaineverything-app-better-than.html

More apps:

Lecturnity ( http://www.lecturnity.com )

Tegrity http://tegr.it/

FlySketch http://flyingmeat.com/flysketch/

http://presentationtube.com/
a lengthy review is available here: http://smorgastech.blogspot.com/?goback=%2Egde_2038260_member_5807615489219772416#%21

subtitles screencast coursecapture

Below is informative exchange on how to subtitle course capture (screencast):

Are we talking Camtasia Studio or Relay?

 

Relay no longer publishes to Flash – it was replaced with MP4 and a “Smart Player” – and the subtitling is stored in an XML file that is dynamically read by the Smart Player.

 

I can confirm that Studio burns the captions into an MP4, as Steve points out.

 

-Jeremy

 

   Jeremy Anderson

Instructional Technologist

203.582.3792 | jjanderson@quinnipiac.edu

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Covello, Steve
Sent: Friday, May 10, 2013 2:52 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Subtitling Screencasts

 

Camtasia captioning is burn-in, as far as I know (at least in Mac 2). So I don’t think Flash is an aspect of it unless that is the format you are exporting it as.

 

– Steve

 

Steve Covello

Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor

Granite State College

603-513-1346

Skype: steve.granitestate

Scheduling: http://meetme.so/stevecovello

 

 

From: Frank Lowney <frank.lowney@GCSU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Friday, May 10, 2013 2:42 PM
To: BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU” <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [BLEND-ONLINE] Subtitling Screencasts

 

 

Both ScreenFlow (Mac-only) and Camtasia (Mac/Win) support subtitling.  Both are excellent screencast applications but I prefer ScreenFlow because it creates MPEG-4 files whereas Camtasia requires Flash for subtitles and that pretty much rules out mobile.

 

If these screencastsare made with some other, less expensive apps, I suggest using free, open source apps.  There are many but I prefer Jubler for creating subtitles and Subler for installing them in MPEG-4 files. These are Mac apps.

 

I’ve recently come across CapScribe which is free to education and plan to look it over carefully.  It looks very promising: http://www.inclusivemedia.ca/services/capscribe.shtml This is also Mac-only.

 

 

On May 10, 2013, at 12:00 AM, BLEND-ONLINE automatic digest system <LISTSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU> wrote:

 

Hello!

In creating accessible online and blended courses, one of the challenges we
are dealing with is making sure faculty created videos (narrated
PowerPoints, screencasts, etc.) are accessible.  I would love to hear how
others are handling this.  Do you recommend/require that these videos be
closed captioned?  If so, who is responsible for creating the closed
captions?  Do you have staff on campus that do this or is it the faculty
member’s responsibility?  Or do you use a service?  Can you recommend any
software that helps someone easily create closed captions or a service that
can provide this?

Thank you so much,
Andrea

Andrea Milligan
Director of Instructional Technology and Design
North Shore Community College
1 Ferncroft Road
Danvers, MA 01923
978-739-5425

==================================================================

Dr. Frank Lowney  Georgia College & State University

Projects Coordinator, Digital Innovation Group @ Georgia College

   Chappell Hall 212 (CBX 106)

Web SiteBlog, GCSU Email, iCloud Email

My latest book: The Coming ePublishing Revolution in Higher Education

Voice: (478) 445-1344

NOTICE: Please be advised that I am hearing impaired and communicate most effectively via e-mail.  Follow-up summaries of telephone conversations by e-mail are most appreciated.

 

Video editing software

https://www.facebook.com/groups/onlinelearningcollective/permalink/576281399669229/

Recommendations for Video editing software (easy & cheap) to edit, cut, splice, voice/ sound over videos. I need better than a free phone app, but I’m also not looking to make Hollywood level movie productions either.

Responses: Camtasia, Active Presenter, DaVinci Resolve, Screencast-o-matic

feedback w technology

How to Give Your Students Better Feedback With Technology ADVICE GUIDE

y Holly Fiock and Heather Garcia

https://www.chronicle.com/interactives/20191108-Advice-Feedback

students continue to report dissatisfaction with the feedback they get on assignments and tests — calling it vague, discouraging, and/or late.

The use of technology in the classroom (both in face-to-face and online environments)

  • Rubrics: online scoring guides to evaluate students’ work.
  • Annotations: notes or comments added digitally to essays and other assignments.
  • Audio: a sound file of your voice giving feedback on students’ work.
  • Video: a recorded file of you offering feedback either as a “talking head,” a screencast, or a mix of both.
  • Peer review: online systems in which students review one another’s work.

Two main types of feedback — formative and summative — work together in that process but have different purposes. Formative feedback occurs during the learning process and is used to monitor progress. Summative feedback happens at the end of a lesson or a unit and is used to evaluate the achievement of the learning outcomes.

Good feedback should be: Frequent, Specific, Balanced, Timely

guide on inclusive teaching, frequent, low-stakes assessments are an inclusive teaching practice.

Time-Saving Approaches: rubrics and peer-reviews.

When to Use Audio or Video Tools for Feedback: personalize your feedback, convey nuance, demonstrate a process, avoid miscommunication

Faculty interest in classroom innovation is on the rise. Professors are trying all sorts of new techniques to improve the first few minutes of class, to make their teaching more engaging, to hold better class discussions. Buzzwords like active learningauthentic assessmenttechnology integration, and case-based learning are more and more a part of faculty discussions.

Don’t assume technology will solve every problem.

Avoid making long videos

Video and audio feedback doesn’t have to be perfect.

There is such a thing as too much information.

Have a plan.

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more on feedback in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=feedback

handwriting to text

OneNote
OneNote is the obvious choice for anyone who is using a Microsoft Surface or other Windows-based tablet. It is also available to use on iPads and on Android tablets. The option to have handwriting converted to text is an outstanding feature.

Google Keep
If you’re a G Suite for Education user, Google Keep. It doesn’t have the handwriting-to-text function that OneNote offers.

Zoho Notebook
Zoho Notebook doesn’t have the name recognition of OneNote or Keep. Zoho Notebook has the most intuitive design or organization options of the three digital notebooks featured here.

The downside to Zoho Notebook is that the handwriting option only appears on the Android and iOS platforms. If the handwriting option worked in the Chrome or Edge web browsers,

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more on screencasting lecturecapture in this iMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=touch+screen

Flipgrid Live

You're in the right place! Holly Clark's Flipgrid Feature: Empowering Gen Z debuts LIVE right here at 7:00 PM CT!Check…

Posted by Flipgrid on Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Recording available here: https://vimeo.com/302720572/a2d799560f

#GridTip: Flipgrid + Screencastify

https://blog.flipgrid.com/news/screencastify

Screencastify is a tool that allows students and educators to personalize their learning experience through sharing their voice via a screen recording. The app is a Chrome extension, meaning the tool is always at the ready whenever you want to capture some magic!

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More about Flipgrid in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=flipgrid

video length for online courses

From: The EDUCAUSE Blended and Online Learning Constituent Group Listserv <BLEND-ONLINE@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU> on behalf of Robert, Jenay <jrr296@PSU.EDU>
Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2018 9:58:49 AM

Dear colleagues,

I am collaborating on a project comparing the efficacy of two types of instructional videos. We are looking for literature that describes similar research. For example, a study might compare students who have watched voice-over ppt slides and students who have watched Khan-style videos, examining students’ content knowledge and/or some affective constructs. Alternatively, a study might compare the lengths or speeds of only one type of video.

Given the dearth of literature addressing these variables, I am hoping this community can help us uncover some additional research for our literature review. I am happy to compile and share everything that is shared with me over the coming days.

Jenay Robert, Ph.D. Research Project Manager Teaching and Learning with Technology  The Pennsylvania State University

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Clossen, A. S. (2018). Trope or Trap? Roleplaying Narratives and Length in Instructional Video. Information Technology & Libraries37(1), 27-38.

It is impossible to please everyone all the time—at least that is what survey results suggest. There are several takeaways to this study: Video length matters, especially as a consideration before the video is viewed. Timestamps should be included in video creation, or it is highly likely that the video will not be viewed. The video player is key here, as some video players include video length, while others do not. Videos that exceed four minutes are unlikely to be viewed unless they are required. Voice quality in narration matters. Although preference in type of voice inevitably varies, the actor’s voice is noticed over production value. It is important that the narrator speaks evenly and clearly. For brief how-to videos, there is a small preference for screencast instructional videos over a narrative roleplay scenario. The results of the survey indicate that roleplay videos should be wellproduced, brief, and high quality. However, what constitutes high quality is not very well established.15 Finally, screencast videos should include an example scenario, however brief, to ground the viewer in the task.

Lin, S., Aiken, J. M., Seaton, D. T., Douglas, S. S., Greco, E. F., Thoms, B. D., & Schatz, M. F. (2017). Exploring Physics Students’ Engagement with Online Instructional Videos in an Introductory Mechanics Course. Physical Review Physics Education Research13(2), 020138-1.

Kruse, N. B., & Veblen, K. K. (2012). Music teaching and learning online: Considering YouTube instructional videos. Journal Of Music, Technology & Education5(1), 77-87. doi:10.1386/jmte.5.1.77_1

Buzzetto-More, N. A. (2014). An Examination of Undergraduate Student’s Perceptions and Predilections of the Use of YouTube in the Teaching and Learning Process. Interdisciplinary Journal Of E-Learning & Learning Objects1017-32.

Chekuri, C., & Tiecheng, L. (2007). Extracting content from instructional videos by statistical modelling and classification. Pattern Analysis & Applications10(2), 69-81.

My note; too old as data but interesting as methodology

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more on chunk theory in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=chunk+theory

specifically Adobe’s “findings” : http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/01/17/microlearning-instructional-design/

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