Searching for "data library"

library web page and heat map

Usability of the library web page

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Amy Kimura <amy.kimura@rutgers.edu>
Subject: [lita-l] Qualitative analytics tools

Hi everyone,

Is anyone out there using CrazyEgg, Hotjar, Mouseflow or the like as a source of analytic data?

If so, I’d love to hear about what you’re using, how you’re using it, what you’ve been able to get out of it. I’m convinced that it will be useful for informing content contributors about how their content is being (or more likely not being) consumed by users — but I’m particularly interested in other ways to utilize the tools and the data they provide.

Thanks so much! Amy

————
Amy Kimura
Web Services Librarian, Shared User Services
Rutgers University Libraries
amy.kimura@rutgers.edu
p: 848.932.5920

My response to Amy:

In my notes: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/07/library-technology-conference-2017/

Here is the 2016 session and contact information to the three fellows, who did an excellent presentation not only how, but why exactly these tools:  http://sched.co/69f2

Here is the link to the 2017 session, which seems closest to your question. http://sched.co/953o Again, the two presenters most probably will be able to help you with your questions, if they have not seen already your posting on the LITA listserv and responded.

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CrazyEgg, Hotjar, Mouseflow




altmetrics library Lily Troia

Taking Altmetrics to the Next Level in Your Library’s Systems and Services

Instructor: Lily Troia, Engagement Manager, Altmetric
October 31, 2017, 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central time

Register here, courses are listed by date

This 90 minute webinar will bring participants up to speed on the current state of altmetrics, and focus in on changes across the scholarly ecosystem. Through sharing of use cases, tips, and open discussion, this session will help participants to develop a nuanced, strategic framework for incorporating and promoting wider adoption of altmetrics throughout the research lifecycle at their institution and beyond.

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https://www.force11.org/sites/default/files/d7/presentation/1/fsci_mt9_altmetrics_day1.pdf

Definition by National Information Standards Organization NISO (http://www.niso.org/home/): Altmetrics is a broad term that encapsulates the digital collection, creation, and use of multiple forms of assessment that are derived from activity and engagement among diverse stakeholders and scholarly outputs in the research ecosystem.”

Altmetrics are data that help us understand how often and by whom research objects are discussed, shared, and used on the social Web.”

PlumX Metrics – Plum Analytics

Altmetric Explorer

https://www.altmetric.com/login.php

How are researchers & institutions using Altmetric?

  • Research and evaluation services – Identify & track influential research; assess impact & reach
  • Grants and reporting – Target new grants & grantees; demonstrate value to stakeholders
  • Communications and reputation management – Track press/social media; connect to opinion leaders
  • Marketing and promotion – Highlight vital findings; benchmark campaigns and outreach
  • Collaboration and partnerships – Discover disciplinary intersections & collaborative opportunities

DISCOVERY • Find trending research • Unearth conversations among new audiences • Locate collaborators & research opportunities • Identify key opinion leaders • Uncover disciplinary intersection

SHOWCASING • Identifying research to share • Share top mentions • Impact on public policy • Real-time tracking • Identifying key researchers • Recognizing early-career researchers

REPORTING • Grant applications • Funder reporting • Impact requirements • Reputation management • Benchmarking and KPIs (Key performance indicators) • Recruitment & review • Integration into researcher profiles/repositories

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https://www.force11.org/sites/default/files/d7/presentation/1/fsci_mt9_altmetrics_day_2.pdf

https://www.force11.org/sites/default/files/d7/presentation/1/fsci_mt9_altmetrics_fridaysummary.pptx

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more on altmetrics in the library in this IMS blog
https://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=altmetrics+library

SPED library instruction

Library instruction Information Literacy Digital Literacy

Instructor, Michael Pickle.  September 26, 4-5:30PM for SPED 204

short link to this blog entry: http://bit.ly/scsusped204

My name is Plamen Miltenoff and I will be leading your digital literacy instruction today: Here is more about me: http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/ and more about the issues we will be discussing today: http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/
As well as my email address for further contacts: pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

  1. How do we search?
    1. Google and Google Scholar (more focused, peer reviewed, academic content)
    2. Digg http://digg.com/, Reddit https://www.reddit.com/ , Quora https://www.quora.com/
    3. SCSU Library search, Google, Professional organization, (e.g. NASET), Stacks of magazines, SCSU library info, but need to know what all of the options mean on that page
    4. http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/02/publish-metrics-ranking-and-citation-info/
  2. Custom Search Engine:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/11/17/google-custom-search-engine/
  3. Basic electronic (library) search information and strategies. Library research services

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

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  • Searching SCSU library

https://www.stcloudstate.edu/library/

library research guide

here is the link to SPED:
https://stcloud.lib.minnstate.edu/subjects/guide.php?subject=SPED

50 min : http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/bi/ 

5 min to introduce and make a connection

Plan 1. Introduction to the library (for library novices: Virtual Reality library orientation and gamified library instruction ) 

15 min for a Virtual Reality tours of the Library + quiz on how well they learned the library:
http://bit.ly/VRlib

and 360 degree video on BYOD:

Play a scavenger hunt IN THE LIBRARY: http://bit.ly/learnlib

data visualization for librarians

Eaton, M. E. (2017). Seeing Seeing Library Data: A Prototype Data Visualization Application for Librarians. Journal of Web Librarianship, 11(1), 69–78. Retrieved from http://academicworks.cuny.edu/kb_pubs

Visualization can increase the power of data, by showing the “patterns, trends and exceptions”

Librarians can benefit when they visually leverage data in support of library projects.

Nathan Yau suggests that exploratory learning is a significant benefit of data visualization initiatives (2013). We can learn about our libraries by tinkering with data. In addition, handling data can also challenge librarians to improve their technical skills. Visualization projects allow librarians to not only learn about their libraries, but to also learn programming and data science skills.

The classic voice on data visualization theory is Edward Tufte. In Envisioning Information, Tufte unequivocally advocates for multi-dimensionality in visualizations. He praises some incredibly complex paper-based visualizations (1990). This discussion suggests that the principles of data visualization are strongly contested. Although Yau’s even-handed approach and Cairo’s willingness to find common ground are laudable, their positions are not authoritative or the only approach to data visualization.

a web application that visualizes the library’s holdings of books and e-books according to certain facets and keywords. Users can visualize whatever topics they want, by selecting keywords and facets that interest them.

Primo X-Services API. JSON, Flask, a very flexible Python web micro-framework. In addition to creating the visualization, SeeCollections also makes this data available on the web. JavaScript is the front-end technology that ultimately presents data to the SeeCollections user. JavaScript is a cornerstone of contemporary web development; a great deal of today’s interactive web content relies upon it. Many popular code libraries have been written for JavaScript. This project draws upon jQuery, Bootstrap and d3.js.

To give SeeCollections a unified visual theme, I have used Bootstrap. Bootstrap is most commonly used to make webpages responsive to different devices

D3.js facilitates the binding of data to the content of a web page, which allows manipulation of the web content based on the underlying data.

 

scsu library position proposal

Please email completed forms to librarydeansoffice@stcloudstate.edu no later than noon on Thursday, October 5.

According to the email below, library faculty are asked to provide their feedback regarding the qualifications for a possible faculty line at the library.

  1. In the fall of 2013 during a faculty meeting attended by the back than library dean and during a discussion of an article provided by the dean, it was established that leading academic libraries in this country are seeking to break the mold of “library degree” and seek fresh ideas for the reinvention of the academic library by hiring faculty with more diverse (degree-wise) background.
  2. Is this still the case at the SCSU library? The “democratic” search for the answer of this question does not yield productive results, considering that the majority of the library faculty are “reference” and they “democratically” overturn votes, who see this library to be put on 21st century standards and rather seek more “reference” bodies for duties, which were recognized even by the same reference librarians as obsolete.
    It seems that the majority of the SCSU library are “purists” in the sense of seeking professionals with broader background (other than library, even “reference” skills).
    In addition, most of the current SCSU librarians are opposed to a second degree, as in acquiring more qualification, versus seeking just another diploma. There is a certain attitude of stagnation / intellectual incest, where new ideas are not generated and old ideas are prepped in “new attire” to look as innovative and/or 21st
    Last but not least, a consistent complain about workforce shortages (the attrition politics of the university’s reorganization contribute to the power of such complain) fuels the requests for reference librarians and, instead of looking for new ideas, new approaches and new work responsibilities, the library reorganization conversation deteriorates into squabbles for positions among different department.
    Most importantly, the narrow sightedness of being stuck in traditional work description impairs  most of the librarians to see potential allies and disruptors. E.g., the insistence on the supremacy of “information literacy” leads SCSU librarians to the erroneous conclusion of the exceptionality of information literacy and the disregard of multi[meta] literacies, thus depriving the entire campus of necessary 21st century skills such as visual literacy, media literacy, technology literacy, etc.
    Simultaneously, as mentioned above about potential allies and disruptors, the SCSU librarians insist on their “domain” and if they are not capable of leading meta-literacies instructions, they would also not allow and/or support others to do so.
    Considering the observations above, the following qualifications must be considered:
  3. According to the information in this blog post:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/14/technology-requirements-samples/
    for the past year and ½, academic libraries are hiring specialists with the following qualifications and for the following positions (bolded and / or in red). Here are some highlights:
    Positions
    digital humanities
    Librarian and Instructional Technology Liaison

library Specialist: Data Visualization & Collections Analytics

Qualifications

Advanced degree required, preferably in education, educational technology, instructional design, or MLS with an emphasis in instruction and assessment.

Programming skills – Demonstrated experience with one or more metadata and scripting languages (e.g.Dublin Core, XSLT, Java, JavaScript, Python, or PHP)
Data visualization skills
multi [ meta] literacy skills

Data curation, helping students working with data
Experience with website creation and design in a CMS environment and accessibility and compliance issues
Demonstrated a high degree of facility with technologies and systems germane to the 21st century library, and be well versed in the issues surrounding scholarly communications and compliance issues (e.g. author identifiers, data sharing software, repositories, among others)

Bilingual

Provides and develops awareness and knowledge related to digital scholarship and research lifecycle for librarians and staff.

Experience developing for, and supporting, common open-source library applications such as Omeka, ArchiveSpace, Dspace,

 

Responsibilities
Establishing best practices for digital humanities labs, networks, and services

Assessing, evaluating, and peer reviewing DH projects and librarians
Actively promote TIGER or GRIC related activities through social networks and other platforms as needed.
Coordinates the transmission of online workshops through Google HangoutsScript metadata transformations and digital object processing using BASH, Python, and XSLT

liaison consults with faculty and students in a wide range of disciplines on best practices for teaching and using data/statistical software tools such as R, SPSS, Stata, and MatLab.

 

In response to the form attached to the Friday, September 29, email regarding St. Cloud State University Library Position Request Form:

 

  1. Title
    Digital Initiatives Librarian
  2. Responsibilities:
    TBD, but generally:
    – works with faculty across campus on promoting digital projects and other 21st century projects. Works with the English Department faculty on positioning the SCSU library as an equal participants in the digital humanities initiatives on campus
  • Works with the Visualization lab to establish the library as the leading unit on campus in interpretation of big data
  • Works with academic technology services on promoting library faculty as the leading force in the pedagogical use of academic technologies.
  1. Quantitative data justification
    this is a mute requirement for an innovative and useful library position. It can apply for a traditional request, such as another “reference” librarian. There cannot be a quantitative data justification for an innovative position, as explained to Keith Ewing in 2015. In order to accumulate such data, the position must be functioning at least for six months.
  2. Qualitative justification: Please provide qualitative explanation that supports need for this position.
    Numerous 21st century academic tendencies right now are scattered across campus and are a subject of political/power battles rather than a venue for campus collaboration and cooperation. Such position can seek the establishment of the library as the natural hub for “sandbox” activities across campus. It can seek a redirection of using digital initiatives on this campus for political gains by administrators and move the generation and accomplishment of such initiatives to the rightful owner and primary stakeholders: faculty and students.
    Currently, there are no additional facilities and resources required. Existing facilities and resources, such as the visualization lab, open source and free application can be used to generate the momentum of faculty working together toward a common goal, such as, e.g. digital humanities.

 

 

 

 

measuring library outcomes and value

THE VALUE OF ACADEMIC LIBRARIES
A Comprehensive Research Review and Report. Megan Oakleaf

http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/issues/value/val_report.pdf

Librarians in universities, colleges, and community colleges can establish, assess, and link
academic library outcomes to institutional outcomes related to the following areas:
student enrollment, student retention and graduation rates, student success, student
achievement, student learning, student engagement, faculty research productivity,
faculty teaching, service, and overarching institutional quality.
Assessment management systems help higher education educators, including librarians, manage their outcomes, record and maintain data on each outcome, facilitate connections to
similar outcomes throughout an institution, and generate reports.
Assessment management systems are helpful for documenting progress toward
strategic/organizational goals, but their real strength lies in managing learning
outcomes assessments.
to determine the impact of library interactions on users, libraries can collect data on how individual users engage with library resources and services.
increase library impact on student enrollment.
p. 13-14improved student retention and graduation rates. High -impact practices include: first -year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing – intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, Value of Academic Libraries diversity/global learning, service learning/community -based learning, internships, capstone courses and projects

p. 14

Libraries support students’ ability to do well in internships, secure job placements, earn salaries, gain acceptance to graduate/professional schools, and obtain marketable skills.
librarians can investigate correlations between student library interactions and their GPA well as conduct test item audits of major professional/educational tests to determine correlations between library services or resources and specific test items.
p. 15 Review course content, readings, reserves, and assignments.
Track and increase library contributions to faculty research productivity.
Continue to investigate library impact on faculty grant proposals and funding, a means of generating institutional income. Librarians contribute to faculty grant proposals in a number of ways.
Demonstrate and improve library support of faculty teaching.
p. 20 Internal Focus: ROI – lib value = perceived benefits / perceived costs
production of a commodity – value=quantity of commodity produced × price per unit of commodity
p. 21 External focus
a fourth definition of value focuses on library impact on users. It asks, “What is the library trying to achieve? How can librarians tell if they have made a difference?” In universities, colleges, and community colleges, libraries impact learning, teaching, research, and service. A main method for measuring impact is to “observe what the [users] are actually doing and what they are producing as a result”
A fifth definition of value is based on user perceptions of the library in relation to competing alternatives. A related definition is “desired value” or “what a [user] wants to have happen when interacting with a [library] and/or using a [library’s] product or service” (Flint, Woodruff and Fisher Gardial 2002) . Both “impact” and “competing alternatives” approaches to value require libraries to gain new understanding of their users’ goals as well as the results of their interactions with academic libraries.
p. 23 Increasingly, academic library value is linked to service, rather than products. Because information products are generally produced outside of libraries, library value is increasingly invested in service aspects and librarian expertise.
service delivery supported by librarian expertise is an important library value.
p. 25 methodology based only on literature? weak!
p. 26 review and analysis of the literature: language and literature are old (e.g. educational administrators vs ed leaders).
G government often sees higher education as unresponsive to these economic demands. Other stakeholder groups —students, pa rents, communities, employers, and graduate/professional schools —expect higher education to make impacts in ways that are not primarily financial.

p. 29

Because institutional missions vary (Keeling, et al. 2008, 86; Fraser, McClure and
Leahy 2002, 512), the methods by which academic libraries contribute value vary as
well. Consequently, each academic library must determine the unique ways in which they contribute to the mission of their institution and use that information to guide planning and decision making (Hernon and Altman, Assessing Service Quality 1998, 31) . For example, the University of Minnesota Libraries has rewritten their mission and vision to increase alignment with their overarching institution’s goals and emphasis on strategic engagement (Lougee 2009, allow institutional missions to guide library assessment
Assessment vs. Research
In community colleges, colleges, and universities, assessment is about defining the
purpose of higher education and determining the nature of quality (Astin 1987)
.
Academic libraries serve a number of purposes, often to the point of being
overextended.
Assessment “strives to know…what is” and then uses that information to change the
status quo (Keeling, et al. 2008, 28); in contrast, research is designed to test
hypotheses. Assessment focuses on observations of change; research is concerned with the degree of correlation or causation among variables (Keeling, et al. 2008, 35) . Assessment “virtually always occurs in a political context ,” while research attempts to be apolitical” (Upcraft and Schuh 2002, 19) .
 p. 31 Assessment seeks to document observations, but research seeks to prove or disprove ideas. Assessors have to complete assessment projects, even when there are significant design flaws (e.g., resource limitations, time limitations, organizational contexts, design limitations, or political contexts); whereas researchers can start over (Upcraft and Schuh 2002, 19) . Assessors cannot always attain “perfect” studies, but must make do with “good enough” (Upcraft and Schuh 2002, 18) . Of course, assessments should be well planned, be based on clear outcomes (Gorman 2009, 9- 10) , and use appropriate methods (Keeling, et al. 2008, 39) ; but they “must be comfortable with saying ‘after’ as well as ‘as a result of’…experiences” (Ke eling, et al. 2008, 35) .
Two multiple measure approaches are most significant for library assessment: 1) triangulation “where multiple methods are used to find areas of convergence of data from different methods with an aim of overcoming the biases or limitations of data gathered from any one particular method” (Keeling, et al. 2008, 53) and 2) complementary mixed methods , which “seek to use data from multiple methods to build upon each other by clarifying, enhancing, or illuminating findings between or among methods” (Keeling, et al. 2008, 53) .
p. 34 Academic libraries can help higher education institutions retain and graduate students, a keystone part of institutional missions (Mezick 2007, 561) , but the challenge lies in determining how libraries can contribute and then document their contribution
p. 35. Student Engagement:  In recent years, academic libraries have been transformed to provide “technology and content ubiquity” as well as individualized support
My Note: I read the “technology and content ubiquity” as digital literacy / metaliteracies, where basic technology instructional sessions (everything that IMS offers for years) is included, but this library still clenches to information literacy only.
National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) http://nsse.indiana.edu/
http://nsse.indiana.edu/2017_Institutional_Report/pdf/NSSE17%20Snapshot%20%28NSSEville%20State%29.pdf
p. 37 Student Learning
In the past, academic libraries functioned primarily as information repositories; now they are becoming learning enterprises (Bennett 2009, 194) . This shift requires academic librarians to embed library services and resources in the teaching and learning activities of their institutions (Lewis 2007) . In the new paradigm, librarians focus on information skills, not information access (Bundy 2004, 3); they think like educators, not service providers (Bennett 2009, 194) .
p. 38. For librarians, the main content area of student learning is information literacy; however, they are not alone in their interest in student inform ation literacy skills (Oakleaf, Are They Learning? 2011).
My note: Yep. it was. 20 years ago. Metaliteracies is now.
p. 41 surrogates for student learning in Table 3.
p. 42 strategic planning for learning:
According to Kantor, the university library “exists to benefit the students of the educational institution as individuals ” (Library as an Information Utility 1976 , 101) . In contrast, academic libraries tend to assess learning outcomes using groups of students
p. 45 Assessment Management Systems
Tk20
Each assessment management system has a slightly different set of capabilities. Some guide outcomes creation, some develop rubrics, some score student work, or support student portfolios. All manage, maintain, and report assessment data
p. 46 faculty teaching
However, as online collections grow and discovery tools evolve, that role has become less critical (Schonfeld and Housewright 2010; Housewright and Schonfeld, Ithaka’s 2006 Studies of Key Stakeholders 2008, 256) . Now, libraries serve as research consultants, project managers, technical support professionals, purchasers , and archivists (Housewright, Themes of Change 2009, 256; Case 2008) .
Librarians can count citations of faculty publications (Dominguez 2005)
.

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Tenopir, C. (2012). Beyond usage: measuring library outcomes and value. Library Management33(1/2), 5-13.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d70921798%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

methods that can be used to measure the value of library products and services. (Oakleaf, 2010; Tenopir and King, 2007): three main categories

  1. Implicit value. Measuring usage through downloads or usage logs provide an implicit measure of value. It is assumed that because libraries are used, they are of value to the users. Usage of e-resources is relatively easy to measure on an ongoing basis and is especially useful in collection development decisions and comparison of specific journal titles or use across subject disciplines.

do not show purpose, satisfaction, or outcomes of use (or whether what is downloaded is actually read).

  1. Explicit methods of measuring value include qualitative interview techniques that ask faculty members, students, or others specifically about the value or outcomes attributed to their use of the library collections or services and surveys or interviews that focus on a specific (critical) incident of use.
  2. Derived values, such as Return on Investment (ROI), use multiple types of data collected on both the returns (benefits) and the library and user costs (investment) to explain value in monetary terms.

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more on ROI in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2014/11/02/roi-of-social-media/

infographics library

Qualey, E. e. (2014). What Can Infographics Do for You?. AALL Spectrum18(4), 7-8.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d97765379%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

Infographics for Advocacy

Infographics for Marketing

Infographics for Data

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more on inforgraphics in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=infographics

academic library and student retention

Demonstrating academic library impact to faculty: a case study

peer-review for the digital library perspective

notes available upon request

library data should focus on “impact”, not “size” to engage faculty.

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more on attrition and retention in academic in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=retention

Privacy & Security in Today’s Library

Privacy & Security in Today’s Library by Amigos Library Services

The virtuality of privacy and security on the from Plamen Miltenoff

From: Jodie Borgerding [mailto:Borgerding@amigos.org]
Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 3:07 PM
To: Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Nicole Walsh <WALSH@AMIGOS.ORG>
Subject: Proposal Submission for Privacy & Security Conference

Hi Plamen,

Thank you for your recent presentation proposal for the online conference, Privacy & Security in Today’s Library, presented by Amigos Library Services. Your proposal, The role of the library in teaching with technology unsupported by campus IT: the privacy and security issues of the “third-party,” has been accepted. I just wanted to confirm that you are still available to present on September 21, 2017 and if you have a time preference for your presentation (11 am, 12 pm, or 2 pm Central). If you are no longer able to participate, please let me know.

Nicole will be touch with you shortly with additional details and a speaker’s agreement.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks!
___________________

Jodie Borgerding Consulting & Education Services Manager Amigos Library Services 1190 Meramec Station Road, Suite 207 | Ballwin, MO  63021-6902 800-843-8482 x2897 | 972-340-2897(direct) http://www.amigos.org | borgerding@amigos.org

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Bio

Dr. Plamen Miltenoff is an Information Specialist and Professor at St. Cloud State University. His education includes several graduate degrees in history and Library and Information Science and terminal degrees in education and psychology.

His professional interests encompass social media, multimedia, Web development and design, gaming and gamification, and learning environments (LEs).

Dr. Miltenoff organized and taught classes such as LIB 290 “Social Media in Global Context” (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib290/) and LIB 490/590 “Digital Storytelling” (http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/lib490/) where issues of privacy and security are discussed.

Twitter handle @SCSUtechinstruc

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

The virtuality of privacy and security on the modern campus:

The role of the library in teaching with technology unsupported by campus IT: the privacy and security issues of the “third-party software” teaching and learning

Abstract/Summary of Your Proposed Session

The virtualization reality changes rapidly all aspects of learning and teaching: from equipment to methodology, just when faculty have finalized their syllabus, they have to start a new, if they want to keep abreast with content changes and upgrades and engagement of a very different student fabric – Millennials.

Mainframes are replaced by microcomputers, microcomputers by smart phones and tablets, hard drives by cloud storage and wearables by IoT. The pace of hardware, software and application upgrade is becoming unbearable for students and faculty. Content creation and methodology becomes useless by the speed of becoming obsolete. In such environment, faculty students and IT staff barely can devote time and energy to deal with the rapidly increasing vulnerability connected with privacy and security.

In an effort to streamline ever-becoming-scarce resources, campus IT “standardizes” campus use of applications. Those are the applications, which IT chooses to troubleshoot campus-wide. Those are the applications recommended to faculty and students to use.

In an unprecedented burgeoning amount of applications, specifically for mobile devices, it is difficult to constraint faculty and students to use campus IT sanctioned applications, especially considering the rapid pace of such applications becoming obsolete. Faculty and students often “stray” away and go with their own choice. Such decision exposes faculty and students, personally, and the campus, institutionally, at risk. In a recent post by THE Journal, attention on campuses is drown to the fact that cyberattacks shift now from mobile devices to IoT and campus often are struggling even with their capability to guarantee cybersecurity of mobile devices on campus. Further, the use of third-party application might be in conflict with the FERPA campus-mandated policies. Such policies are lengthy and complex to absorb, both by faculty and students and often are excessively restrictive in terms of innovative ways to improve methodology and pedagogy of teaching and learning. The current procedure of faculty and students proposing new applications is a lengthy and cumbersome bureaucratic process, which often render the end-users’ proposals obsolete by the time the process is vetted.

Where/what is the balance between safeguarding privacy on campus and fostering security without stifling innovation and creativity? Can the library be the campus hub for education about privacy and security, the sandbox for testing and innovation and the body to expedite decision-making?

Abstract

The pace of changes in teaching and learning is becoming impossible to sustain: equipment evolves in accelerated pace, the methodology of teaching and learning cannot catch up with the equipment changes and atop, there are constant content updates. In an even-shrinking budget, faculty, students and IT staff barely can address the issues above, less time and energy left to address the increasing concerns about privacy and security.

In an unprecedented burgeoning amount of applications, specifically for mobile devices, it is difficult to constraint faculty and students to use campus IT sanctioned applications, especially considering the rapid pace of such applications becoming obsolete. Faculty and students often “stray” away and go with their own choice. Such decision exposes faculty and students, personally, and the campus, institutionally, at risk. In a recent post by THE Journal (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/06/06/cybersecurity-and-students/), attention on campuses is drawn to the fact of cyberattacks shifting from mobile devices to IoT but campus still struggling to guarantee cybersecurity of mobile devices on campus. Further, the use of third-party applications might be in conflict with the FERPA campus-mandated policies. Such policies are lengthy and complex to absorb, both by faculty and students and often are excessively restrictive in terms of innovative ways to improve methodology and pedagogy of teaching and learning. The current procedure of faculty and students proposing new applications is a lengthy and cumbersome bureaucratic process, which often render the end-users’ proposals obsolete by the time the process is vetted.

Where/what is the balance between safeguarding privacy on campus and fostering security without stifling innovation and creativity? Can the library be the campus hub for education about privacy and security, the sandbox for testing and innovation and the body to expedite decision-making?

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/06/06/cybersecurity-and-students/

Anything else you would like to add

3 take-aways from this session:

  • Discuss and form an opinion about the education-pertinent issues of privacy and security from the broad campus perspective, versus the narrow library one
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the role of the library on campus in terms of the greater issues of privacy and security

Re-examine the thin red line of the balance between standardization and innovation; between the need for security and privacy protection a

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presentation:
https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/the-virtuality-of-privacy-and-security-on-the 

chat – slide 4, privacy. please take 2 min and share your definition of privacy on campus. Does it differ between faculty and students?  what are the main characteristics to determine privacy

chat – slide 5, security. please take 2 min and share your definition of security on campus regarding electronic activities. Who’s responsibility is security? IT issue [only]?

poles: slide 6, technology unsupported by campus IT, is it worth considering? 1. i am a great believer in my freedom of choice 2. I firmly follow rules and this applies to the use of computer tools and applications 3. Whatever…

chat –  slide 6, why third party applications? pros and cons. E.g. pros – familiarity with third party versus campus-required

pole, slide 6, appsmashing. App smashing is the ability to combine mobile apps in your teaching process. How do you feel about it? 1. The force is with us 2. Nonsense…

pole slide 7 third party apps and the comfort of faculty. How do you see the freedom of using third party apps? 1. All I want, thank you 2. I would rather follow the rules 3. Indifference is my middle name

pole slide 8 Technology standardization? 1. yes, 2. no, 3. indifferent

chat slide 9 if the two major issues colliding in this instance are: standardization versus third party and they have impact on privacy and security, how would you argue for the one or the other?

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notes from the conference

 

 

Measuring Library Vendor Cyber Security: Seven Easy Questions Every Librarian Can Ask

http://journal.code4lib.org/articles/11413

Bill Walker: http://www.amigos.org/innovating_metadata

 

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more on security in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=security

more on privacy in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=privacy

tablets library

Bornett, C. C. (2016). Leseförderung digital genial: WieTablets die Bibliothekspädagogik verändern / Tipps nicht nur für Bilderbuch-Apps. (German). Bub: Forum Bibliothek Und Information, 68(10), 606-608.

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d118913547%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite 

Šorgo, A., Bartol, T., Dolničar, D., & Podgornik, B. B. (2017). Attributes of digital natives as predictors of information literacy in higher education. British Journal Of Educational Technology, 48(3), 749-767. doi:10.1111/bjet.12451   http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d122273174%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite
(PDF available through ILL)
Biology, IT faculty Maribor, Slovenia. None of them is a librarian

Correlation and regression analysis based on survey data revealed that the attributes of digital natives are poor predictors of IL. information and communication technologies (ICT) experiences expressed as the sum of the use of different applications do not necessarily contribute to IL; some applications have a positive and some a negative effect; personal ownership of smartphones, portable computers and desktop computers has no direct effect on IL, while ownership of a tablet computer is actually a negative predictor; personal ownership of ICT devices has an impact on ICT experiences and Internet confidence, and, therefore, an indirect impact on IL; and ICT-rich university courses (if not designed to cultivate IL) have only a marginal impact on IL, although they may have some impact on ICT experiences and Internet confidence. The overall conclusion is that digital natives are not necessarily information literate, and that IL should be promoted with hands-on and minds-on courses based on IL standards.

Sharman, A. (2014). Roving Librarian: The Suitability of Tablets in Providing Personalized Help Outside of the Traditional Library. New Review Of Academic Librarianship, 20(2), 185-203. doi:10.1080/13614533.2014.914959

http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dkeh%26AN%3d96764510%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

McRae, L. l. (2015). TEACHING IN AN AGE OF UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING: A DECELERATED CURRICULUM. Digital Culture & Education, 7131-145.
http://login.libproxy.stcloudstate.edu/login?qurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ebscohost.com%2flogin.aspx%3fdirect%3dtrue%26db%3dllf%26AN%3d110123216%26site%3dehost-live%26scope%3dsite

 

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more on mobile devices in the library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=mobile+devices+library

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