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technology use among teachers

Technology Use Among Teachers Strong and Growing

By David Nagel 11/17/16

https://thejournal.com/articles/2016/11/17/technology-use-among-teachers-strong-and-growing.aspx

The study, conducted by adaptive learning provider Front Row Education, found that 75 percent of teachers use technology with students on a daily basis and that a bit more than half have a 1-to-1 ratio of devices to students in their classrooms (up 10 points from last year’s survey). That increase in student devices is helping to drive an increase in the use of technology, with about 60 percent of teachers surveyed saying they expect to increase the use of technology in the 2016–2017 school year.

60 percent of teachers have access to Chromebooks, up 15 percent from last year; 64 percent have access to iPads, down 5 percent from last year. iPads tend to be the tool of choice in lower grades (75 percent in K–2), while Chromebooks dominate the middle school years (66 percent). Interestingly,

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more on technology use among teachers in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+teachers

teachers don’t use technology

11 Reasons why teachers don’t use technology

Lack of training

Training teachers to keep up technological change needs to be constant and if possible self directed so teachers can get the training they need to achieve the goals they want to achieve.

Wrong kind of training – Technical rather than pedagogical

Training needs to be delivered by pedagogical experts who can give teachers hands on experience of using technology to learn.

Wrong kind of training – Not relevant to teaching context

Training examples need to be applied to the materials and content that teachers actually need and have to teach as part of their syllabus.

Wrong trainer

Training needs to be balanced with a critical eye so that teachers also understand the pitfalls, problems and limitations that accompany the use of technology.

Wrong tech

Schools need to be wary edtech hardware vendors. The lifetime of most edtech hardware tends to be pretty short and like mobile phones, the new model can make previous models look tired and old fashioned very quickly.

Lack of syllabus integration

Technology can’t be an add on or extra work. It has to be integrated into and help them with the material they have to cover in the classroom with their students.

Lack of consultation

Teachers need to be part of the selection and procurement process to ensure that they are getting the technology they want and need.

Lack of support at the chalkface

Tech support needs to be delivered in a way that serves and supports the teachers rather than the other way around. Teachers do need to be trained in how to articulate and describe teach problems with accuracy.

Lack of infrastructure

Before investing in classroom hardware schools need to make sure they have sufficient connectivity infrastructure to support the modes of use that teachers will apply with it.

Unrealistic expectations

Technology needs to be applied with an understanding of how it can enable a transformation in students’ pedagogical experience and teachers’ pedagogical practices.

Unnecessary

In many cases teachers see the technology as a hindrance or unnecessary to achieving their aims and in some cases this may be correct.

Wearable Technology: How Teachers Could Use it with Students

Wearable Technology: How Teachers Could Use it with Students – See more at: http://www.tabletsforschools.org.uk/wearable-technology-how-teachers-could-use-it-with-students/#sthash.d7njCEYD.dpuf

Wearable Technology: How Teachers Could Use it with Students

Teachers on Pinterest – A Great Resource for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Teachers on Pinterest – A Great Resource for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/10/teachers-on-pinterest-great-resource.html

Videos Explaining BYOD for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Excellent Videos Explaining BYOD for Teachers and Students ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning:

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/11/excellent-videos-explaining-byod-for.html

Bring Your Own Device/Technology is an initiative meant to increase students learning opportunities through technology.

ICT information and communication technology literacy

The Role of Librarians in Supporting ICT Literacy

May 9, 2019,

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2019/5/the-role-of-librarians-in-supporting-ict-literacy

Academic librarians increasingly provide guidance to faculty and students for the integration of digital information into the learning experience.

TPACK: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

Many librarians have shied away from ICT literacy, concerned that they may be asked how to format a digital document or show students how to create a formula in a spreadsheet. These technical skills focus more on a specific tool than on the underlying nature of information.

librarians have begun to use an embedded model as a way to deepen their connection with instructors and offer more systematic collection development and instruction. That is, librarians focus more on their partnerships with course instructors than on a separate library entity.

If TPACK is applied to instruction within a course, theoretically several people could be contributing this knowledge to the course. A good exercise is for librarians to map their knowledge onto TPACK.

Large dotted line circle labelled Contexts. Inside large circle are three smaller circles overlapping to create a Venn diagram. Pink Circle: Technological Knowledge (TK). Blue Circle: Content Knowledge (CK). Yellow Circle: Pedagogical Knowledge (PK). Pink/Blue overlap: Technological Content Knowledge (TCK). Blue/Yellow Overlap: Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK). Yellow/Pink Overlap: Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK). Center where all 3 overlap: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK).

ICT reflects the learner side of a course. However, ICT literacy can be difficult to integrate because it does not constitute a core element of any academic domain. Whereas many academic disciplines deal with key resources in their field, such as vocabulary, critical thinking, and research methodologies, they tend not to address issues of information seeking or collaboration strategies, let alone technological tools for organizing and managing information.

Instructional design for online education provides an optimal opportunity for librarians to fully collaborate with instructors.

The outcomes can include identifying the level of ICT literacy needed to achieve those learning outcomes, a task that typically requires collaboration between the librarian and the program’s faculty member. Librarians can also help faculty identify appropriate resources that students need to build their knowledge and skills. As education administrators encourage faculty to use open educational resources (OERs) to save students money, librarians can facilitate locating and evaluating relevant resources. These OERs not only include digital textbooks but also learning objects such as simulations, case studies, tutorials, and videos.

Reading online text differs from reading print both physically and cognitively. For example, students scroll down rather than turn online pages. And online text often includes hyperlinks, which can lead to deeper coverage—as well as distraction or loss of continuity of thought. Also, most online text does not allow for marginalia that can help students reflect on the content. Teachers and students often do not realize that these differences can impact learning and retention. To address this issue, librarians can suggest resources to include in the course that provide guidance on reading online.

My note – why specialist like Tom Hergert and the entire IMS is crucial for the SCSU library and librarians and how neglecting the IMS role hurts the SCSU library
Similarly, other types of media need to be evaluated, comprehended, and interpreted in light of their critical features or “grammar.” For example, camera angles can suggest a person’s status (as in looking up to someone), music can set the metaphorical tone of a movie, and color choices can be associated with specific genres (e.g., pastels for romances or children’s literature, dark hues for thrillers). Librarians can explain these media literacy concepts to students (and even faculty) or at least suggest including resources that describe these features

My note – on years-long repetition of the disconnect between SCSU ATT, SCSU library and IMS
instructors need to make sure that students have the technical skills to produce these products. Although librarians might understand how media impacts the representation of knowledge, they aren’t necessarily technology specialists. However, instructors and librarians can collaborate with technology specialists to provide that expertise. While librarians can locate online resources—general ones such as Lynda.com or tool-specific guidance—technology specialists can quickly identify digital resources that teach technical skills (my note: in this case IMS). My note: we do not have IDs, another years-long reminder to middle and upper management. Many instructors and librarians have not had formal courses on instructional design, so collaborations can provide an authentic means to gain competency in this process.

My note: Tom and I for years have tried to make aware SCSU about this combo –
Instructors likely have high content knowledge (CK) and satisfactory technological content knowledge (TCK) and technological knowledge (TK) for personal use. But even though newer instructors acquire pedagogical knowledge (PK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), and technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK) early in their careers, veteran instructors may not have received this training. The same limitations can apply to librarians, but technology has become more central in their professional lives. Librarians usually have strong one-to-one instruction skills (an aspect of PK), but until recently they were less likely to have instructional design knowledge. ICT literacy constitutes part of their CK, at least for newly minted professionals. Instructional designers are strong in TK, PK, and TPK, and the level of their CK (and TCK and TPK) will depend on their academic background. And technology specialists have the corner on TK and TCK (and hopefully TPK if they are working in educational settings), but they may not have deep knowledge about ICT literacy.

Therefore, an ideal team for ICT literacy integration consists of the instructor, the librarian, the instructional designer, and the technology specialist. Each member can contribute expertise and cross-train the teammates. Eventually, the instructor can carry the load of ICT literacy, with the benefit of specific just-in-time support from the librarian and instructional designer.

My note: I have been working for more then six years as embedded librarian in the doctoral cohort and had made aware the current library administrator (without any response) about my work, as well as providing lengthy bibliography (e.g. http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/08/24/embedded-librarian-qualifications/ and have had meeting with the current SOE administrator and the library administrator (without any response).
I also have delivered discussions to other institutions (http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/04/12/embedded-librarian-and-gamification-in-libraries/)
Librarians should seriously consider TPACK as a way to embed themselves into the classroom to incorporate information and ICT literacy.

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more about academic library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=academic+library

more on SAMR and TRACK models in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2018/05/17/transform-education-digital-tools/

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2015/07/29/mn-esummit-2015/

K12 Immersive Technology

K–12 Teachers Use Augmented and Virtual Reality Platforms to Teach Biology

Immersive technology allows students to explore the world firsthand on a molecular level.

Eli Zimmerman

https://edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2019/03/k-12-teachers-use-augmented-and-virtual-reality-platforms-teach-biology-perfcon

t universities and medical schools, students are already using AR and VR

Originally, AR and VR lesson plans revolved around the virtual field trip.with the HTC Vive, for example, can take a detailed, 3D-rendered journey. 

In May 2018, Google announced a partnership with Labster, a virtual lab simulator, to develop immersive high school and college biology and anatomy courses.

by Intel last year, Middle Township High School in New Jersey embraced the idea of using Oculus Rift headsets to examine virtual frogs. In California, a new bill introduced in the state legislature would swap out real animals in schools for virtual replacements to teach biology more humanely.

 

 

disrupting education with technology

Nancy Bailey: Disrupting Education with Technology is Unhealthy for Children

https://dianeravitch.net/2018/11/18/nancy-bailey-disrupting-education-with-technology-is-unhealthy-for-children/

Veteran teacher Nancy Bailey warns about the danger that technology poses to child development. 

Technology is a helpful tool, but it won’t provide that sense of stability. It’s a cold machine. School districts push technology over teachers. They don’t stop to think about what it will mean to children and their development.

the idea that instruction should be disrupted using technology is putting students and the country at risk. It destroys the public school curriculum that has managed to educate the masses for decades.

Early childhood teachers express concern that tech is invading preschool education. We know that free play is the heart of learning.

But programs, like Waterford Early Learning, advertise online instruction including assessment for K-2. Their Upstart program advertises, At-home, online kindergarten readiness program that gives 4- and 5-year-old children early reading, math, and science lessons.

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more on technology in education in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+education

more on Clay Christensen disruption theory in this IMS blog:
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/12/19/clayton-christensen-disruption-theory/

Teaching history with technology

Teaching history with technology

http://www.edteck.com/dbq/more/analyzing.htm

http://teachingprimarysources.illinoisstate.edu/MCTPS/PD_Guide/Section_4.pdf

https://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/worksheets

https://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/

Analysis worksheets, evidence, and primary documents

https://conference.iste.org/uploads/ISTE2017/HANDOUTS/KEY_108132637/29732_flyer_CP_DocAnaly.pdf

https://www.iste.org/explore/articleDetail?articleid=15&category=Set-the-standard&article=
(see rubric)

https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/MEDLIT-excerpt.pdf
(see rubric)

  • Using technology to help students analyze historical/ primary source documents.
  • Making artifacts interactive.
  • Hosting online history discussions
  • The importance of structure and expectations.
  • Using audio in history lessons
  • Recording history with students
  • Hearing history
  • Creating multimedia timelines with students.
  • Simple to complex options for every grade level.
  • Creating multimedia maps
  • Search Strategies for History Students
  • Saving and sharing search results.
  • Google Maps and Earth are not your only options.
  • Creating videos and teaching with video.
  • Making and using virtual tours.
  • Virtual Reality tours.
  • Augmented Reality tours.

Thinglink, Google Expeditions, Poly, 3D printing

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