Searching for "big data library"

Libraries Big Data

Libraries Look to Big Data to Measure Their Worth—And Better Help Students

 Jeffrey R. Young     Nov 17, 2017

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-11-17-libraries-look-to-big-data-to-measure-their-worth-and-better-help-students

counting how many times students use electronic library resources or visit in person, and comparing that to how well the students do in their classes and how likely they are to stay in school and earn a degree. And many library leaders are finding a strong correlation, meaning that students who consume more library materials tend to be more successful academically.

carefully tracking how library use compares to other metrics, and it has made changes as a result—like moving the tutoring center and the writing lab into the library. Those moves were designed not only to lure more people into the stacks, but to make seeking help more socially-acceptable for students who might have been hesitant.

a partnership between the library, which knows what electronic materials students use, and the technology office, which manages other campus data such as usage of the course-management system. The university is doing a study to see whether library usage there also equates to student success.

The issue of privacy also emerged during a session on libraries and data at the annual Educause conference earlier this month.

SCSU at 2018 LITA Library Technology Forum

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On behalf of the 2018 LITA Library Technology Forum Committee, I am pleased to notify you that your proposal, “Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) for Library Orientation: A Scalable Approach to Implementing VR/AR/MR in Education”, has been accepted for presentation at the 2018 LITA Library Technology Forum in Minneapolis, Minnesota (November 8-10).
++++++++++++++
Mark Gill and Plamen Miltenoff will participate in a round table discussion Friday. November 9, 3:30PM at Haytt Regency, Minneapolis, MN. We will stream live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InforMediaServices/

SCSU Augmented Reality Library Tour from Plamen Miltenoff

++++++++++++++++

Notes from the Forum

Risk and Reward: Public Interest and the Public Good at the Intersection of Law, Tech, and Libraries

https://thatandromeda.github.io/forum18_schedule/

Blog: Copyright Librarian; Twitter: @CopyrightLibn

U of MN has a person, whose entire job is to read and negotiate contracts with vendors. No resources, not comfortable to negotiate contracts and vendors use this.

If you can’t open it, you don’t own it. if it is not ours… we don’t get what we don’t ask for.

libraries are now developing plenty, but if something is brought in, so stop analytics over people. Google Analytics collects data, which is very valuable for students. bring coherent rink of services around students and show money saving. it is not possible to make a number of copyright savings. collecting such data must be in the library, not outside. Data that is collected, will be put to use. Data that is collected, will be put to uses that challenge library values. Data puts people at risk. anonymized data is not anonymous. rethink our relationship to data. data sensitivity is contextual.

stop requiring MLSs for a lot of position. not PhDs in English, but people with specific skills.

perspective taking does not help you understand what others want.  connection to tech. user testing – personas (imagining one’s perspective). we need to ask, better employ the people we want to understand. in regard of this, our profession is worse then other professions.

pay more is important to restore value of the profession.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lLHP2TZnmrRodSdulPPOruEeF20iwF5zw6h5aOV8ogg/edit

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Library System Migrations: Issues and Solutions 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=109w_NU3zki_A6Fukpa50zzGJdgazbVSKqf7zAoYaKsc

from Sierra to Alma. SFX. number of challenges

Stanford – Folio, Cornell, Duke and several others. https://www.folio.org/ Alma too locked up for Stanford.

Easy Proxy for Alma Primo

Voyager to OCLC. Archive space from in-house to vendor. Migration

Polaris, payments, scheduling, PC sign up.  Symphony, but discussing migration to Polaris to share ILS. COntent Diem. EasyProxy, from Millenium no Discovery Layer to Koha and EDS. ILL.

WMS to Alma. Illinois State – CARLY – from Voyager to Alma Primo. COntent Diem, Dynex to Koha.

Princeton: Voyager, migrating Alma and FOlio. Ex Libris. Finances migrate to PeopleSoft. SFX. Intota

RFPs – Request for Proposals stage. cloud and self-hosted bid.

Data Preparation. all data is standard, consistent. divorce package for vendors (preparing data to be exported (~10K). the less to migrate, the better, so prioritize chunks of data (clean up the data)

Data. overwhelming for the non-tech services. so a story is welcome. Design and Admin background, not librarian background, big picture, being not a librarian helps not stuck with the manusha (particular records)

teams and committees – how to compile a great team. who makes the decision. ORCHID integration. Blog or OneNote place to share information. touch base with everyone before they come to the meeting. the preplanning makes large meetings more productive.

+++++++++++++

Using Design Thinking — Do we really want a makerspace? 

makerbot replicator 3d printer

one touch studio 4 ready record studio. data analytics + several rooms to schedule.

lighting turned on when USB drive inserted.

++++++++++++++

Article Shortcuts 

2:30 – 2:50

Talk To the Phone (Because the Human Is Overwhelmed) 

Google physical web beacons, NFC lables, QR codes, Augmented Reality. magnetic position. nearby navigations

 

library of congress twitter

Library Of Congress Will No Longer Archive Every Tweet

SCSU library digitizing VHS

SCSU library digitizing VHS tapes

  1. plan
    1. hardware and software
    2. digitizing process
    3. archiving process
    4. issues
  2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen
  3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”
  4. Plan
  • collecting (Identifying VHS to digitize)
  • clearing (Digitize or not digitize?):
    • duplicates (Checking collection for content in other formats)
    • establishing if DVD can be purchased (Availability for sale new)
    • clearing copyrights etc. (Copyright / fair use review )
  • Digitizing the tapes
  • Adobe Premiere CC
    • Capture
    • metadata
      Metadata screen
    • this why  metadata was entered in the post-processed MP4 file using the VLC player

metadata VLC-

 

  • export
    H.264 . /   iPAD 480p 29.9 fps

Shortcuts:

If you are using Premiere CC: 1. File/New/Sequence. 2. Ctrl M is the shortcut to export (M is for media)

Issues
the two Apple/Macs will deliver error messages with both the export to the MP4 format and for burning the CDs and DVDs.
e.g.

  • other issues
    regular restart required for new capture
    error messages e.g.
    error message Premiere CC

 

 

 

 

 

 

other issues:

audio. Audio synchronization during the digitization is off. Solution: possible solution is the last of this thread : https://forums.adobe.com/thread/2217377

open in in QT Pro copy an segment then past it into a new QT file and save. It then plays normally in Adobe products. 

old Apple desktops. needed to be rebuild and reformatted.
Apple burner issues. issues with Premiere license (bigger organization, bigger bureaucracy – keep the licenses within the library, not with IT or the business department)

old VCRs – one of the VCRs was recording bad audio signal

old VHS tapes: the signal jump makes the digital recording stop, thus requiring a constant attendance of the digitization, instead of letting it be digitized and working on something else

burn CD error

Upon upload to MediaSpace,

upload MediaSpace

 

 

the person who is uploading the digitized VHS movies can “Add Collaborator”

add collaborator

 

 

 

The collaborator can be “co-editor” and / or “co-publisher”

co editor

Thus, at the moment, Tom Hegert has been designated to a digitized VHS video as Co-:Publisher and Rhonda Huisman as “Co-Editor.”

Please DO log in into MediaSpace with your STAR ID and confirm that you can locate the video and you can, respectively edit its metadata.

If you can edit the video, this means that the proposed system will work, since the Library can follow the same pattern to “distribute” the videos to the instructors, who these videos are used by; and, respectively these instructors can further control the distribution of the videos in their classes.

  • issues:
    sharing the videos from the generic Library account for MediaSpace to the MediaSPace account of the faculty who had requested the digitization either through sending the link to the video or publish in channel (we called our channel “digitized VHS”)

MediaSpace Channel

 

 

 

  •  issue: ripping off content from DVD.
    Faculty (mostly teaching online / hybrid courses) want to place teaching material from DVD to MediaSpace. Most DVDs are DRM protected.
    Handbreak (https://handbrake.fr/) does not allow ripping DRM-ed DVDs.
    handbreak DRMto bypass this Handbreak issue, we use DVD Decrypter before we run the file through Handbreak
    Solutions:

From: “Lanska, Jeremiah K” <Jeremiah.Lanska@ridgewater.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 10:03 AM
I use a software on a MAC called MacX DVD Video Converter Pro.
https://www.macxdvd.com/
I convert videos to MP4 with this and it just works for just about any DVD. Then upload them to MediaSpace.

Jer Lanska  Media Services Ridgewater College Jeremiah.lanska@ridgewater.edu 320-234-8575

From: “Docken, Marti L” <Marti.Docken@saintpaul.edu>
Date: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 at 8:17 AM

Good morning Plamen.  Here at Saint Paul College, we are asked to get permission from owner when we are looking at making any alterations to a video, tape, etc.  This is true of adding closed captioning as well.  The attached are forms given by Minnesota State which they may have an updated form.
Thank you and have a wonderful day.
Marti Docken Instructional Technology Specialist 651.846.1339 marti.docken@saintpaul.edu

Permission Request Form to Add Closed Caption-288flgx

Memo Closed Captioning Copyright FINAL 10 03 2011-1065jox

From: Geri Wilson
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 3:23 PM
What I do with DVDs is give a warning to the faculty that the MediaSpace link with the captions I’ve created should not be widely shared and should be treated as if it were still a DVD that can be shown in the classroom, but not posted on D2L. Because even if we use those forms, I don’t believe it gives us the right to use the video in a broader way. However, a safer approach might be to burn a new DVD with captions, so that it’s still in the same format that can’t be misused as easily.

Just my 2 cents. Geri

From: “Hunter, Gary B” <Gary.Hunter@minnstate.edu>
Date: Friday, September 14, 2018 at 2:55 PM
To: Plamen Miltenoff_old <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Process of ripping DVD video to mount it on MediaSpace

I’ll assume the contents of the DVDs are movies/films unless I hear otherwise from you.  There’s a lot we need to consider from a copyright perspective. Let me know a day and time that we can touch base via a phone call.  Next week my schedule is flexible, so let me know what day and time work for you.  Until we speak, here’s some of the information related to making copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit teaching purposes.

There are two sections of the Copyright Act that authorize “copying” of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  It doesn’t matter if the copyrighted works are being copied from DVDs, CDs, flash drives, a computer’s hard drive, etc., the same sections of the Copyright Act apply.

  1. Section 110(2), also known as the TEACH Act, allows nonprofit educational institutions to make a digital copy of a nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to a server for online and hybrid teaching.  I have a TEACH Act checklist on the IP Tools & Forms webpage at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/forms.html.  The checklist identifies the few things that may not be copied under this section of the Copyright Act.  If an instructor meets the various requirements on the checklist, than you can make a digital copy of the entire nondramatic copyrighted work and save it to MediaSpace. For nondramatic works, all MinnState instructors should be able to complete the TEACH Act checklist successfully, so I wouldn’t request a completed checklist from them.

Under the TEACH Act, nonprofit educational institutions are only permitted to make a digital copy of reasonable and limited portions of dramatic copyrighted works.  Movies and films are usually dramatic works.   Most people in higher education interpret “reasonable and limited portions” to mean something less than the whole and not the entire movie/film.  There are several guidance documents on the TEACH Act on the IP Tools & Forms webpage that go into greater detail as to what is reasonable and limited portions.  Unfortunately, this section only authorizes the copying of part of the movie/film and not the entire thing.

  1. Section 107 Fair Use of the Copyright Act is the second section that permits copying of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes.  Fair Use is used more than any other section to make copies of copyrighted works for nonprofit educational purposes. An instructor needs to complete a fair Use Checklist showing the proposed copying is authorized by fair use.  An instructor who completes a Fair Use Checklist that ends up being 50/50 or more in support of fair use for their proposed copying of a copyrighted work, should be able to make the digital copy.  Fair Use has some nuances in it for unique situations.  Let’s set up a phone call to further discuss them.  There is also a flow chart that may helpful at http://www.minnstate.edu/system/asa/academicaffairs/policy/copyright/docs/Flow%20Chart-Using%20video%20in%20Online%20-%20D2L%20Courses.pdf.

We also have to consider whether or not the movies/films were purchased with “personal use” rights or “public performance” rights.  Or if an educational license or some similar type of license gives us permission to make copies or publicly perform the movie/film.  More layers of the onion that need peeled back to address the copyright concerns.

++++++++++++++

  • Issue: confidentiality
    All digitized material is backedup on DVDs, whether faculty wants a DVD or not.
    Some video content is confidential (e.g. interviews with patients) and faculty does not want any extra copies, but the DVD submitted to them. How do we archive / do we archive the content then?

error msg upload MediSpaceBurning (Archiving)

  • where to store the burned DVDs? their shelf life is 12 years.
  • DVD’s must be labeled with soft tip perm marker, not labels. labels glue ages quickly.
  • all our desktops are outdated (5+ years and older). We used two Apple/Macs. OS El Captain, Version 10.11.6, 2.5 Gxz Intel Core i5. 8GB memory, 1333 MHz DDR3, Graphic Card AMD Radeon HD 6750 MD 512 MB

 

Question about the process of archiving the CDs and DVDs after burning. What is the best way to archive the digitized material? Store the CD and DVDs? Keep them in the “cloud?”

Question about the management of working files: 1. Premiere digitizes the original hi-quality file in .mov format and it is in GB. The export is in .mp4 format and it is in MB. Is it worth to store the GB-size .mov format and for how long, considering that the working station has a limited HDD of 200GB

we decided to export two types of files using Adobe Premiere: a) a low end .MP4 file about several hundred megabites, which respectively is uploaded in SCSU Media Space (AKA Kaltura) and b) one high-end (better quality) one the realm of several GBs, which was the archived copy

digital preservation vhs tapes-workflow

We placed a request for two 2TB HDD with the library dean and 10TB file space with the SCSU IT department. Idea being to have the files for MediaSpace readily available on the hardrives, if we have to make them available to faculty and the high-end files being stored on the SCSU file server.

 

++++++++++++++++++

2. correspondence among Greg J, Tom H and Plamen

email correspondence Greg, Tom, Plamen regarding Kaltura account:

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:32 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Question Kaltura

Plamen,

Channels are not required using this workflow.  Just the collaboration change.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:31 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Question Kaltura

Greg,

About the channel:

Do I create one channel (videos)?

It seems to be a better idea to create separate channels for each of faculty, who’s videotapes are digitized.

Your take?

p

 

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:28 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

You can now sign in here: https://scsu.mediaspace.kaltura.com/  with SCSULibraryVideo as the user and whatever password you selected.

Upload a video.

Click the edit button:

Choose the collaboration ‘tab’:

Add a collaborator:

Just type in part of their name:

Add them as co-editor and co-publisher.

******* any user you wish to collaborate with, will need to first sign in to mediaspace in order to provision their account.****  After they have signed in, you will be able to add them as collaborator.

Once they’ve been added, they will have access to the video in their MedisSpace account.

Like so:

From the My Media area:

Click ‘Filters’:

Then choose either media I can publish, or media I can edit:

If you want to simply change ownership to the requestor (for video available only to a single person), just choose change media owner on the collaboration tab.

The process above will allow for any number of collaborators, in a fashion similar to ‘on reserve’.

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: FW: Supplemental Account Request Status

Tom,

I submitted the request to Greg with the “SCSULibraryVideo” name

Greg, I submitted, Tom, Rachel W and Rhonda H (and you) as “owners.”
Pls, if possible, do not assigned to Tom ownership rights yet and add him later on.

I also received your approval, so I am starting to work on it

Txs

p

—————-

 

From: Husky Tech <huskytech@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:16 AM
To: Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Supplemental Account Request Status

Plamen,

This message confirms your request for a new Supplemental Account with the requested username of SCSULibraryVideo. Please allow 2-3 business days for processing. You will be notified by email when your request is approved or denied. You may also check the status of your request by returning to the Supplemental Accounts Maintenance site.

Thank you for your request and please contact us with questions or concerns.

HuskyTech
720 4th Avenue South
St. Cloud, MN 56301
(320) 308-7000
HuskyTech@stcloudstate.edu

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:11 AM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>, Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

 

Plamen, (or Tom)

 

Go here and request one: https://huskynet.stcloudstate.edu/myHuskyNet/supplemental-acct.asp

Once you’ve done that, just let me know the name of the account.  (LibraryVideoDrop, SCSULibraryVideo, etc….)

I’ll then add it to the Mediaspace access list.

 

If there’s already an account to which you have access, we can use that, too.  Remember, though, credentials will be shared at least between the two of you.

 

–g–

 

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:08 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Well, that is a good question. Do we need a “STAR ID” type of account for the library?
If so, who will be the person to talk to. After Diane Schmitt, I do not know who to ask

Tom, can you ask the library dean’s office for any “generic” account?

Greg, for the time being, is it possible to have me as the “owner” of that account? Would that conflict with my current Kaltura account/content?

Can I participate for this project with my student account (as you helpled me several weeks ago restore it for D2L usage)?

p

—————-

Plamen Miltenoff, Ph.D., MLIS

Professor

320-308-3072

pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu

http://web.stcloudstate.edu/pmiltenoff/faculty/

Knowledge is built from active engagement with conflicting and confounding ideas that challenge older, pre-existing knowledge (Piaget, 1952).

From: Greg <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 11:04 AM
To: Thomas Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, Plamen Miltenoff <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Tom – I think we can accommodate that, too….

I like Plamen’s idea of a test.

Plamen – is there a library dept supplemental account we should also use as part of the test?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:50 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Yes, except that there may be needs for multiple faculty to access the files. Think of it as analogous to DVDs on reserve or even in the general collection.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:29 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Hmmm…..

Would this be the process:

  • VHS digitized
  • File placed in Mediaspace (SCSULibrary supplemental acct, for example, would be the ‘owner’/uploader)
  • Link sent to original faculty requestor for review of file (if it was edited/correct edits made, CC burned in for open captions, etc…)
  • Ownership transfer to requesting faculty so they can share link/embed, etc… as they need.

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:24 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

Send someone the link, probably allow downloads by faculty, absolutely stream via MediaSpace

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Friday, November 17, 2017 at 10:22 AM
To: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>, “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

Share, as in send someone the link? Or share, as in, let others upload/download from the location?

Do these things need to stream from the location (as in Mediaspace), or is this more of a file drop?

–g–

From: Hergert, Thomas R.
Sent: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:19 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>; Miltenoff, Plamen <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Re: Kaltura’s account for the library

I think we’re hoping for an account from which we can share Library resources such as the digitized versions of VHS tapes that Plamen and I are creating. As I understand it, a closed channel is probably not the best answer. We need a common repository that can have open access to SCSU Kaltura users.

Tom

From: “Jorgensen, Greg S.” <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Date: Thursday, November 16, 2017 at 2:03 PM
To: “Miltenoff, Plamen” <pmiltenoff@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Tom Hergert <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: RE: Kaltura’s account for the library

A single account can’t really be shared in the way you’re asking, but we can easily add a dept. supplemental account to Mediaspace.  I just need the name of the account.

Depending on what you intend, maybe a closed channel? Create a closed channel and add individuals as needed?

–g–

From: Miltenoff, Plamen
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 11:41 AM
To: Jorgensen, Greg S. <gsjorgensen@stcloudstate.edu>
Cc: Hergert, Thomas R. <trhergert@stcloudstate.edu>
Subject: Kaltura’s account for the library

Greg,

Can you help me create a MediaSpace account for the library use.
How can it be tight up to the STAR ID login specifications?

Is it possible, let’s say Tom and I to use our STAR ID to login into such account?
Any info is welcome…

Plamen

++++++++++++

3. correspondence on the LITA listserv regarding “best practices for in house digital conversion”

 

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Sharona Ginsberg <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:07 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

I’m at an academic rather than public library, but you can see what we offer for digital conversion here: https://www.oswego.edu/library/digital-conversion. We’ve been generally happy with our equipment, and I especially think the Elgato Video Capture device (VHS to digital) is a good tool.

– Sharona

From: <lita-l-request@lists.ala.org> on behalf of Molly Schwartz <mschwartz@metro.org>
Reply-To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 10:03 AM
To: “lita-l@lists.ala.org” <lita-l@lists.ala.org>
Subject: Re: [lita-l] best practices for in house digital conversion

Hi Stew,

We are not a public library, but we did recently set up an AV media transfer rack here in METRO’s studio in partnership with the XFR Collective. There is a full list of the media formats we can transfer here on our website, as well as a lot more great information in the documentation.

 

I would also definitely recommend DCPL’s Memory Lab and the project to build a Memory Lab Network, which is more applicable to public libraries.

 

best,

Molly

 

On Tue, Nov 21, 2017 at 10:49 AM, Stewart Wilson <SWilson@onlib.org> wrote:

Hi all,

I know there is a lot of information already out here, but is anyone up for a conversation about media conversion technologies for public library patrons?

 

I’m interested in best practices and recommended technologies or guides that you use in your system.

 

Anything that converts projector slides, 35mm, VHS, photographs, cassette, etc.

 

We are building a new PC for this and 3D rendering, so any recommendations for things like soundcards or video capture cards are also useful.

 

Thanks for your help; this group is the best.​

 

Stew Wilson

Paralibrarian for Network Administration and Technology

Community Library of Dewitt & Jamesville

swilson@onlib.org

315 446 3578
To maximize your use of LITA-L or to unsubscribe, see http://www.ala.org/lita/involve/email

Molly C. Schwartz

Studio Manager

http://metro.org/services/599studio

mschwartz@metro.org

212-228-7132

esummit 2018 prsentation
https://www.slideshare.net/aidemoreto/scsu-library-digitizing-archiving-vhs-tapes-105758307

SCSU library digitizing/ archiving VHS tapes from Plamen Miltenoff

++++++++
more on digitizing in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=digitizing

scsu library position proposal

Please email completed forms to librarydeansoffice@stcloudstate.edu no later than noon on Thursday, October 5.

According to the email below, library faculty are asked to provide their feedback regarding the qualifications for a possible faculty line at the library.

  1. In the fall of 2013 during a faculty meeting attended by the back than library dean and during a discussion of an article provided by the dean, it was established that leading academic libraries in this country are seeking to break the mold of “library degree” and seek fresh ideas for the reinvention of the academic library by hiring faculty with more diverse (degree-wise) background.
  2. Is this still the case at the SCSU library? The “democratic” search for the answer of this question does not yield productive results, considering that the majority of the library faculty are “reference” and they “democratically” overturn votes, who see this library to be put on 21st century standards and rather seek more “reference” bodies for duties, which were recognized even by the same reference librarians as obsolete.
    It seems that the majority of the SCSU library are “purists” in the sense of seeking professionals with broader background (other than library, even “reference” skills).
    In addition, most of the current SCSU librarians are opposed to a second degree, as in acquiring more qualification, versus seeking just another diploma. There is a certain attitude of stagnation / intellectual incest, where new ideas are not generated and old ideas are prepped in “new attire” to look as innovative and/or 21st
    Last but not least, a consistent complain about workforce shortages (the attrition politics of the university’s reorganization contribute to the power of such complain) fuels the requests for reference librarians and, instead of looking for new ideas, new approaches and new work responsibilities, the library reorganization conversation deteriorates into squabbles for positions among different department.
    Most importantly, the narrow sightedness of being stuck in traditional work description impairs  most of the librarians to see potential allies and disruptors. E.g., the insistence on the supremacy of “information literacy” leads SCSU librarians to the erroneous conclusion of the exceptionality of information literacy and the disregard of multi[meta] literacies, thus depriving the entire campus of necessary 21st century skills such as visual literacy, media literacy, technology literacy, etc.
    Simultaneously, as mentioned above about potential allies and disruptors, the SCSU librarians insist on their “domain” and if they are not capable of leading meta-literacies instructions, they would also not allow and/or support others to do so.
    Considering the observations above, the following qualifications must be considered:
  3. According to the information in this blog post:
    http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2016/06/14/technology-requirements-samples/
    for the past year and ½, academic libraries are hiring specialists with the following qualifications and for the following positions (bolded and / or in red). Here are some highlights:
    Positions
    digital humanities
    Librarian and Instructional Technology Liaison

library Specialist: Data Visualization & Collections Analytics

Qualifications

Advanced degree required, preferably in education, educational technology, instructional design, or MLS with an emphasis in instruction and assessment.

Programming skills – Demonstrated experience with one or more metadata and scripting languages (e.g.Dublin Core, XSLT, Java, JavaScript, Python, or PHP)
Data visualization skills
multi [ meta] literacy skills

Data curation, helping students working with data
Experience with website creation and design in a CMS environment and accessibility and compliance issues
Demonstrated a high degree of facility with technologies and systems germane to the 21st century library, and be well versed in the issues surrounding scholarly communications and compliance issues (e.g. author identifiers, data sharing software, repositories, among others)

Bilingual

Provides and develops awareness and knowledge related to digital scholarship and research lifecycle for librarians and staff.

Experience developing for, and supporting, common open-source library applications such as Omeka, ArchiveSpace, Dspace,

 

Responsibilities
Establishing best practices for digital humanities labs, networks, and services

Assessing, evaluating, and peer reviewing DH projects and librarians
Actively promote TIGER or GRIC related activities through social networks and other platforms as needed.
Coordinates the transmission of online workshops through Google HangoutsScript metadata transformations and digital object processing using BASH, Python, and XSLT

liaison consults with faculty and students in a wide range of disciplines on best practices for teaching and using data/statistical software tools such as R, SPSS, Stata, and MatLab.

 

In response to the form attached to the Friday, September 29, email regarding St. Cloud State University Library Position Request Form:

 

  1. Title
    Digital Initiatives Librarian
  2. Responsibilities:
    TBD, but generally:
    – works with faculty across campus on promoting digital projects and other 21st century projects. Works with the English Department faculty on positioning the SCSU library as an equal participants in the digital humanities initiatives on campus
  • Works with the Visualization lab to establish the library as the leading unit on campus in interpretation of big data
  • Works with academic technology services on promoting library faculty as the leading force in the pedagogical use of academic technologies.
  1. Quantitative data justification
    this is a mute requirement for an innovative and useful library position. It can apply for a traditional request, such as another “reference” librarian. There cannot be a quantitative data justification for an innovative position, as explained to Keith Ewing in 2015. In order to accumulate such data, the position must be functioning at least for six months.
  2. Qualitative justification: Please provide qualitative explanation that supports need for this position.
    Numerous 21st century academic tendencies right now are scattered across campus and are a subject of political/power battles rather than a venue for campus collaboration and cooperation. Such position can seek the establishment of the library as the natural hub for “sandbox” activities across campus. It can seek a redirection of using digital initiatives on this campus for political gains by administrators and move the generation and accomplishment of such initiatives to the rightful owner and primary stakeholders: faculty and students.
    Currently, there are no additional facilities and resources required. Existing facilities and resources, such as the visualization lab, open source and free application can be used to generate the momentum of faculty working together toward a common goal, such as, e.g. digital humanities.

 

 

 

 

NMC Horizon Report 2017 Library

NMC Horizon Report > 2017 Library Edition

http://www.nmc.org/publication/nmc-horizon-report-2017-library-edition/

PDF file 2017-nmc-horizon-report-library-EN-20ml00b

p. 26 Improving Digital Literacy

As social networking platforms proliferate and more interactions take place digitally, there are more opportunities for propagation of misinformation, copyright infringement, and privacy breaches.
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-3/
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2017/03/28/fake-news-resources/

p. 34 Embracing the need for radical change

40% of faculty report that their students ” rarely” interact with campus librarians.

Empathy as the Leader’s Path to Change | Leading From the Library, By on October 27, 2016, http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2016/10/opinion/leading-from-the-library/empathy-as-the-leaders-path-to-change-leading-from-the-library/

Empathy as a critical quality for leaders was popularized in Daniel Goleman’s work about emotional intelligence. It is also a core component of Karol Wasylyshyn’s formula for achieving remarkable leadership. Elizabeth Borges, a women’s leadership program organizer and leadership consultant, recommends a particular practice, cognitive empathy.

Leadership in disruptive times, , First Published September 27, 2016, http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0340035216658911

What is library leadership?  a library leader is defined as the individual who articulates a vision for the organization/task and is able to inspire support and action to achieve the vision. A manager, on the other hand, is the individual tasked with organizing and carrying out the day-to-day operational activities to achieve the vision.Work places are organized in hierarchical and in team structures. Managers are appointed to administer business units or organizations whereas leaders may emerge from all levels of the hierarchical structures. Within a volatile climate the need for strong leadership is essential.  

Leaders are developed and educated within the working environment where they act and co-work with their partners and colleagues. Effective leadership complies with the mission and goals of the organization. Several assets distinguish qualitative leadership:

Mentoring. Motivation. Personal development and skills. Inspiration and collaboration. Engagement. Success and failure. Risk taking. Attributes of leaders.

Leaders require having creative minds in shaping strategies and solving problems. They are mentors for the staff, work hard and inspire them to do more with less and to start small and grow big. Staff need to be motivated to work at their optimum performance level. Leadership entails awareness of the responsibilities inherent to the roles of a leader. However, effective leadership requires the support of the upper management.

p. 36. Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries

http://horizon.wiki.nmc.org/Horizon+Topics

  1. consumer technologies
  2. Digital strategies are not so much technologies as they are ways of using devices and software to enrich teaching, learning, research and information management, whether inside or outside the library. Effective Digital strategies can be used in both information and formal learning; what makes them interesting is that they transcended conventional ideas to create something that feels new, meaningful, and 21st century.
  3. enabling technologies
    this group of technologies is where substantive technological innovation begins to be visible.
  4. Internet technologies.
  5. learning technologies
  6. social media technologies. could have been subsumed under the consumer technology category, but they have become so ever-present and so widely used in every part of society that they have been elevated to their own category. As well-established as social media is, it continues to evolve at a rapid pace, with new ideas, tools, and developments coming online constantly.
  7. Visualization technologies.  from simple infographics to complex forms of visual data analysis. What they have in common is that they tap the brain’s inherent ability to rapidly process visual information, identify patterns, and sense order in complex situations. These technologies are a growing cluster of tools and processes for mining large data sets, exploring dynamic processes, and generally making the complex simple.

new horizon report 2017 technologies

 

 

p. 38 Big Data
Big data has significant implications for academic libraries in their roles as facilitators and supporters of the research process. big data use in the form of digital humanities research. Libraries are increasingly seeking to recruit for positions such as research data librarians, data curation specialists, or data visualization specialists

p. 40  Digital Scholarship Technologies

digital humanities scholars are leveraging new tools to aid in their work. ubiquity of new forms of communication including social media, text analysis software such as Umigon is helping researchers gauge public sentiment. The tool aggregates and classifies tweets as negative, positive, or neutral.

p. 42 Library Services Platforms

Diversity of format and materials, in turn, required new approaches to content collection and curation that were unavailable in the incumbent integrated library systems (ILS), which are primarily designed for print materials. LSP is different from ILS in numerous ways. Conceptually, LSPs are modeled on the idea of software as a service (SaaS),which entails delivering software applications over the internet.

p. 44 Online Identity.
incorporated  the  management of digital footprints into their programming and resources

simplify the idea of digital footprint as“data about the data” that people are searching or using online. As resident champions for advancing digital literacy,304 academic and research libraries are well-positioned to guide the process of understanding and crafting online identities.

Libraries are becoming integral players in helping students understand how to create and manage their online identities. website includes a social media skills portal that enables students to view their digital presence through the lens in which others see them, and then learn how they compare to their peers.

p. 46  Artificial Intelligence

https://www.semanticscholar.org/

p. 48 IoT

beacons are another iteration of the IoT that libraries have adopted; these small wireless devices transmit a small package of data continuously so that when devices come into proximity of the beacon’s transmission, functions are  triggered based on a related application.340 Aruba Bluetooth low-energy beacons to link digital resources to physical locations, guiding patrons to these resources through their custom navigation app and augmenting the user experience with location-based information, tutorials, and videos.

students and their computer science  professor  have  partnered  with   Bavaria’s State Library to develop a library app that triggers supplementary information about its art collection or other points of interest as users explore the space

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more on Horizon Reports in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=horizon+report

computers in library conference

computers in libraries conference

March 28-30 preconference workshops March 27 hyatt regency crystal city
arlington, va
http://conferences.infotoday.com/documents/221/CIL2017-Advance-Program.pdf

W5: Want Media Coverage? Add Press Room to Your Website

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Kathy Dempsey, Editor, Marketing Library Services newsletter Owner, Libraries Are Essential consultancy

Library marketers crave media attention and coverage, but most don’t know how to get it. The first step is having a Press Room as part of your library’s website. This workshop, led by a member of the media who’s also a library marketing expert, shows you how to build a Press Room that works. It includes how your library benefits from having an online Press Room, even if you don’t have a marketing department; where it belongs in your website hierarchy; what content members of the press expect to find there; SEO basics and PR tactics to lead reporters to your online Press Room; why building relationships with the media is vital; how press coverage affects your library’s usage, funding, brand recognition, and position in the community. Help ensure positive coverage by adding this strategic tool to your website.

W8: Video: Hands-On Learning & Practice

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Jennifer E. Burke, President, IntelliCraft Research, LLC

In this half-day workshop, a former advertising executive and trainer of strategic storytelling in marketing shares secrets on how to create video that has an impact on your community. Join her to shoot, edit, and polish a video while gathering tips, techniques, and strategies to create your own video-a medium which grabs communities in exciting new ways!

W10: Implementing an Internet of Things Infrastructure & Apps

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

May Chang, Assistant Director, LibraryTechnology, East Carolina University
Mehdi Mohammadi, Graduate Assistant, Western Michigan University

The Internet of Things (IoT) is becoming widespread in academia as well as industry. It refers to connecting smart objects with built-in unique identifiers and sensors to communicate with each other autonomously. This enables actionable insights and ultimately makes the environment around us smarter. This workshop looks at how libraries can incorporate the IoT and reviews different aspects of developing an IoT infrastructure and creating your own application. It is based on four layers of IoT application architecture: the physical layer, the communications layer, application and services layer, and data analytics. Speakers discuss the potentials and challenges of IoT applications, including the footprint of IoT applications, i.e., a high volume of sensory data, the tools and methods for data analytics. As a case study, they focus on location-aware applications using iBeacons and smartphone sensors to show how all the IoT elements work together. Gain a better understanding of the usefulness of IoT in libraries, learn the main elements and underlying technologies of IoT applications, and understand the difference between a wide range of IoT devices, protocols and technologies to choose the right ones for your IoT application. Get budget and resource estimates and more. Come with a basic understanding of JavaScript/ HTML5/ CSS and your laptop for hands-on development practice. An instruction document will be provided for the attendees to prepare their system before the workshop.

W15: Tech Trends for Libraries in 2017 & Beyond

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

David Lee King, Digital Services Director, Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library and Publisher, davidleeking.com

Technology has changed the face of libraries and is continuing to change how we work and how we deliver services to customers. This workshop introduces emerging technology trends and shows how those trends are reshaping library services. Examples are provided of how to incorporate these evolving trends into libraries. Attendees learn what trends to look for, find out the difference between a technology trend and a fad, and get ideas on how their library can respond to technology as it emerges.

 

W16: UX Design for Broader Discovery

1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Stephanie Rosso, Principal Web Developer, Hennepin County Library
Amy Luedtke, Senior Librarian, Information Programs and Services, Hennepin County Library
Iain Lowe, BiblioCommons Inc.

While patrons have embraced using online technology to access their public library, most of these interactions are limited to borrowing transactions. If libraries are to be truly relevant in the digital world, we need to nudge patrons out of the well-worn pattern of log-in/transact /log-out and find ways to get them to linger long enough to discover the richness the library has to offer beyond borrowing items, while offering them opportunities to add their own voice to the library’s online community. This workshop explores design patterns and techniques for introducing content to patrons at appropriate moments in their learned workflows. It considers how to encourage patrons to add their voice to the library community and overcome concerns about privacy and security. It shares research and experience from BiblioCommons and Hennepin County Public Library’s efforts and looks at analogs from other domains. Workshop participants will be asked to participate actively in a hands-on session to solve a specific design challenge in teams.

My note: Ha. Even the public library understands that service goes beyond “borrowing items” and must have “patrons to add their voice.” Only in the academic library, prevails the opinion that librarians are those omnipotent and all-knowing lecturing types.

B103: Website Redesign: Techniques & Tools

1:15 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Dana Haugh, Web Services Librarian, Stony Brook University
Roy Degler, Associate Professor, Digital Library Services, Digital Resources and Discovery Services, Oklahoma State University
Emily R Mitchell, Librarian / Webmaster, SUNY Oswego

Join three web experts to learn about tips, tools, and techniques for taking the pain out of website redesigns. Haugh provides advice on the visual design of your next site and shows some examples of library web redesigns. Degler takes a look at why many libraries are using popular, free, CSS-based frameworks such as Bootstrap; explains how the grid layout works; and shows how the built-in responsive design layouts can deliver a site that works on desktop, smartphones, and tablets. Often the biggest challenge in redesign isn’t the visual design, content management system or coding. It’s the people and politics. Everyone thinks they know what the library website should look like, but no two people—let alone groups—can ever agree. How do you move ahead with a library redesign when you’re facing conflicting demands from the administration, co-workers, users, and stakeholders? Mitchell tackles this challenge head on and points out the weapons that we have at hand—from data to documentation; and discusses how to wield those weapons effectively to win (almost) any fight in order to build a great website. Grab lots of insights and ideas from this experienced panel.

C102: Digital Literacy & Coding Program Models

11:15 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Karen Walker, E-Services & Digital Access Manager, Jacksonville Public Library
Brandy McNeil, Associate Director – Tech Education & Training, The New York Public Library
Steven Deolus, Technology Training Program Coordinator, TechConnect (Technology Training Program Department), The New York Public Library

This session looks at how one library created a technology class and programming model that spans a 21-branch, 844-square-mile library system. It discusses mobile classrooms and how Chromebooks, MacBooks, tablets, and other equipment are used to create “classrooms” throughout the system. It shares how the library is focusing on members and programming for the community, for instance, the development of Spanish language, 50+ and immigrant/refugee programming. It looks at developing new programs and instructors using the 3D model from printer to pens, from tablets to coding, from core expertise to everyone. NYPL speakers discuss how coding is the new black! They discuss how to launch a coding program at your library, how to expand the age range of current coding programs, how to promote events related to your program to gain participants, how to get staff buy-in, how to educate staff, and how to create partnerships with some of the biggest names in the game. The NYPL Tech- Connect program will help you plan out all your needs to take your existing or non-existing coding programs further.

My note: one more proof that digital literacy is not “information literacy dressed in the new verbal cloth” of “digital literacy,” but entails way more topics, skills and knowledge. Information Literacy is a 1990s concept. Time to upgrade to 2016 concepts and recognize that digital literacy requires skills beyond handling information. Moreover, information today is way more complex then the skills being taught, since information from social media is more complex then information from news media and it entails technology skills, which one does not have to preside upon for handling news media

E104: From Textbook to Activism: Engaging Students in Social Issues They Care About

2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Janie Pickett, Head Librarian, Eureka High School, Eureka, Mo.
Anna Gray, Social Studies Teacher, Eureka High School, Eureka, Mo.

recent collaborative effort between a high school social studies teacher and a school librarian transformed a “same-old” unit on social movements in the 20th century into a dynamic study of effective social activism—and how students can become effective activists. Using both primary and secondary resources, students learned to analyze social issues, then to identify the type of activism that proved effective for those issues. Next, students selected social situations important to them, analyzed the changes they sought to effect, and determined a means of activism to effect that change in practical—and often surprising—ways. The project’s design and implementation is straightforward and replicable. This session provides concrete steps to follow, specific patterns for locating learning resources, and reproducible forms that educators can carry back to their own campuses.

B202: Managing Tech & Innovation

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Jen Baum Sevec, Senior Metadata and Acquisitions Librarian, Library Of Congress
Brett Williams, Systems & Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Mississauga

Sevec offers leaders at any level the opportunity to up their game by learning current management strategies for technology and innovation. Library leaders and constituents engage in the nearly constant interplay of enabling technology and innovations to explore a wealth of information and greater depth of data in the Information Age. A framework for managing this interplay is provided as well as an understanding of the dynamic lifecycle inherent in technological innovations and constituent demands. Williams provides an introduction to Wardley Value Chain Mapping, an innovative IT planning processes discussed by Simon Wardley on his blog Bits and Pieces. He shares specific examples of how this tool can be used by systems librarians, library administrators, and library IT decision makers.

B203: Finding Your Social Media Voice

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Meghan Kowalski, Head, Preservation, The Catholic University of America
Kirsten Mentzer, Technology Specialist, Northern Virginia Community College’s Medical Education Campus
Alexandra Radocchia Zealand, Web Editor, New Media Developer and Video Producer, Web Team, Arlington Public Library PLA, VLA, ALA, LLAMA
Lennea R. Bower, Program Specialist, Virtual Services, Montgomery County Public Libraries

This session provides an in-depth look at how to speak in social media. Each institution and organization’s social media accounts has a personality. How you say something is just as important as what you say and why you say it. Your voice on social media says a lot to your followers. If done well, your tone will help to attract and keep an audience. The wrong kind of voice will turn people away. Finding the right voice can be difficult and involves a lot of trial and error. Speakers provide tips for finding the right voice and presenting the best personality for your intended followers. Social media is no longer the “new kid on the block,” and the panel highlights the best ways to communicate content, being real, tone, and more. They showcase what kinds of tones can be used and how to find the “real voice” for your accounts, why those voices are (or are not) successful for those accounts; and how to make your chosen voice sustainable and consistent across your accounts.

C203: Migrating & Developing With Drupal

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

June Yang, Senior Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Linda Venable, Systems Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Elizabeth Zoby, Information Specialist, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)
Billy Mathews, Web Developer, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)

Migrating to a new ILS system is not easy, and it is even more challenging when faced with a very tight deadline. Presenters share the recent experience of migrating from SirsiDynix Symphony to Alma within 5 months: what worked, what didn’t, lessons learned, and what to prepare in advance of the migration. They also share some insight about post migration work related to data cleanup, workflows review, etc. Zoby and Mathews share their development of the NIC micro-sites using Drupal, an open-source content management software, to create dynamic websites that make accessing material easy and user-friendly. Instead of having to download and shift through large PDF documents, users can access the content on easily searchable websites which can be edited by authorized users. See how the NIC Information Center is using these sites to help customers and the public access information in innovative ways.

D202: Funding Opps for Digital Library Initiatives

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist, Office of Strategic Initiatives, Library Of Congress
Nicole Ferraiolo, Program Officer, Scholarly Resources, Council on Library & Information Resources
Joel Wurl, Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities

Discovering and deciphering guidelines for grant programs is a daunting and challenging process. This session provides an opportunity to directly hear from and ask questions about grant opportunities for digital libraries’ initiatives to program officers from different government and private funders. Following brief overviews of the relevant funding opportunities at their organizations, panelists discuss the kinds of projects that best fit their specific programs. Get suggestions on how to develop a competitive proposal and insights on the application and review process. Panelists consider themes and trends from the digital library projects that have received funding, such as digitization, open educational resources, linked data, crowdsourcing, open access publishing, emulation and virtualization, and data visualization. By bringing together representatives from different funders, this session offers a unique opportunity to connect directly with program officers and identify new opportunities and approaches for funding.

A301: Augmented Reality & Learning

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Ashley Todd-Diaz, Head, Special Collections & University Archives, Towson University
Earl Givens, Head, Systems & Technology, Catawba College
Art Gutierrez, Head, Technical Services, Emporia State University
Bethanie O’Dell, Virtual Learning Librarian, Emporia State University

Just when you thought the battle of augmented reality (AR) was over with Pokémon GO, libraries across the nation have been exploring additional AR options in order to meet the needs of the mobile learners walking through their doors. With the use of free AR software, four individuals team up to become the ultimate masters of AR. Hear from a panel of closely networked professionals, each with a unique story of embedding AR into specific library services directed for higher education. These stories range from embedding AR with liaison departments to incorporating AR into information literacy sessions (both online and face-to-face).

A304: Multimodal Learning: From Textbooks to Playlists

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Laurie Burruss, Professor, Pasadena City College

Colleges, universities, and libraries are considering adding video making, or visual literacy, as a core skill. Preparing individuals for a highly visual communication landscape requires critical thinking to offset consumerism as well as multimodal learning and cognitive skills. Researching, creating, and sharing video playlists are important ways to create personalized learning pathways and promote continuous learning. Explore a number of case studies that demonstrate the positive learning outcomes of multimodal learning in academic and corporate settings and discover how to create playlists that can be annotated, edited, and shared across teams.

B304: Raspberry Pi

2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

David Bennett, Systems Librarian, Robert Morris University

Raspberry Pi is an inexpensive computing tool that is ideal for new projects within libraries. It’s a powerful single board computer that plays high-definition video, yet it’s only the size of a credit card. The Raspberry Pi 3 was released in February of 2016, and the built-in networking options make it an exciting fit for library applications. Learn how Raspberry Pi can be used as a people counter, a dedicated OPAC, a social media tool, and more.

D302: Upping Our “Gamification”: Speaking Millennials’ Language

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

David Folmar, Emerging Technology Librarian, Main Branch, Richmond Public Library Author, Game It Up! Using Gamification to Incentivize Your Library

Be tech-smart and culture-savvy by using game-design thinking and gaming activities to connect with current users in a fun way and draw in new ones. Hear from a library communicator who literally wrote the book on this topic. Online games are incredibly popular; libraries, book apps, and learning institutions are leveraging this to bring in new audiences and engage with existing ones in new ways. Why are they doing this, what is the benefit, and how do you make it work to promote your library? Get the answers here!

D303: Library Story in Video

1:45 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Jennifer E. Burke, President, IntelliCraft Research, LLC

Video is a powerful, emotional storytelling medium that plays well in social media, and its use is still fast-growing. Video can spread your library’s story, and you can do it without hiring an expensive pro. A tech-savvy info pro shares basic video facts, along with her favorite tools, tips, and techniques that almost anyone can use for creating short, compelling videos to promote library services, staffers, and resources.

My note: my mouth ran dry to repeat this to the SCSU library. In vain. 1. make a low-cost social-media type of movie of 30 sec each week/month. 2. post on a prominent place on the library web page. 3. Have web form harvest info from patrons on the issu[s] reflected in the video 4. mirror video on the social media 5. aim as ultimate goal patrons (students, faculty, staff) furbishing the video footage instead of library staff
Why is it soooo difficult to comprehend?

E302: Zero to Maker: Invention Literacy & Mobile Memory Lab

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Dominique China, Information Services Librarian, Brampton Library
Colleen Dearborn, Adult Services Librarian, Alsip-Merrionette Park Library, Alsip, Ill.

Invention literacy is not just about understanding how a thing is made or how it works; it is also the ability to use that knowledge to bring one’s own ideas into reality. China gives examples of how one public library is empowering children, teens, and adults to become “invention-literate” through its maker programming. Find out how a combination of high- and low-tech equipment, safe and accessible learning environments, and a unique community partnership is nurturing invention, creative confidence, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Sparked by the CIL 2016 Hawkins and Mears talk about personal digital archiving and the DCPL Memory Lab, Dearborn shares her library’s inexpensive journey to create a mobile memory lab program. She discusses the acquisition of equipment and technology, the demo classes, lesson plans about personal archiving, outreach to other community organizations, and providing classes on related topics, such as saving and uploading images, backing up files and using cloud storage, writing and self-publishing memoirs, conducting oral interviews with veterans and other family memories, coding and saving memories on a website, etc. Future plans include digitizing local history documents, a community website with links to these documents, as well as to our patrons’ digitized images, videos, interviews and memoirs.

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more on technology in library in this IMS blog
http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims?s=technology+library

big data and LRS door counters

LITA discussion (attached below) on how one can easily do real-time but also big-data like estimate of patrons’ attendance in the library.

GitHub https://github.com/ and listuser@chillco.com Cary, for wifi connected counter

From: Cary Gordon [mailto:listuser@chillco.com]
Sent: Sunday, March 29, 2015 9:35 AM
To: lita-l@lists.ala.org
Subject: [lita-l] Re: patron/door counter

I am not an expert on door counters, but I think that it would be pretty simple — no, really — to make your own system using a small, inexpensive computer like a Raspberry Pi with a wifi adapter and connect it to your current counter. It would take a little programming, but the result could be something that the community could share.

If you are interested in this, we could create a project on GitHub. I would be happy to help.

Cary

On Mar 28, 2015, at 2:49 PM, Mason Yang <hyang@marymount.edu> wrote:

Hi,

We have a old door counter which can only be checked manually. We are looking for a new door counter system which can help us to find out how many patrons come in during certain hours. I found a couple systems online and would like know if some libraries recently installed any door counter systems and what’s your experience with them. I made a short list of questions below. If you can take a few minutes to answer those questions or just drop a line or two of your comments to reply to this email, I will really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance for your time and inputs!

  1. what’s the model and the brand of the door counter system?
  1. Wired to your network or wireless connected to the internet?
  1. Does the system count the number of entries/exists hourly?
  1. Dose the system generate reports,if any, automatically?
  1. What’s your general experience of the system?
  1. Will you recommend the system to other libraries?

 

Thanks,

Mason Yang

Electronic Services Librarian

Library & Learning Services

Marymount University

 

Phone: 703-526-6844

Fax: 703-284-1685

mason.yang@marymount.edu

free “big data” sources

The Free ‘Big Data’ Sources Everyone Should Know

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141210080103-64875646-the-free-big-data-sources-everyone-should-know

Data.gov, click here.
US Census Bureau click here.
European Union Open Data Portal, click here.
Data.gov.uk, click here.
The CIA World Factbook, click here.
Healthdata.gov, click here.
NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre, click here.
Amazon Web Services public datasets, click here.
Facebook Graph, click here.
Gapminder, click here.
Google Trends, click here.
Google Finance, click here.
Google Books Ngrams, click here.
National Climatic Data Center, click here.
DBPedia, click here.
Topsy, click here.
Likebutton, click here.
New York Times, click here.
Freebase, click here.
Million Song Data Set, click here.

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