Searching for "education technology"

contemplative computing, contemplative pedagogy and getting “unplugged”

Mark Zuckerberg’s Sister Published A Book About A Child Whose Mom Takes Her iPad Away
http://www.businessinsider.com/randi-zuckerbergs-kids-book-dot-2013-11#ixzz2jmchiAAf

social media etiquette

unplug

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/03/books/review/randi-zuckerbergs-dot-complicated-and-dot.html

Contemplative Pedagogy and Dealing with Technology
Dan Barbezat, Amherst College; David Levy, University of Washington

https://docs.google.com/viewer?pid=sites&srcid=cG9kbmV0d29yay5vcmd8d2lraXBvZGlhfGd4OjY4MDVkOTRlNGQyODY0ZjY&docid=9ffbca34d1874ac24b0a339bd01f94cf%7Cbeba8a8cdb041811cbd3136e0fdbd53b&a=bi&pagenumber=45&w=800

The accelerating pace of life is reducing the time for thoughtful reflection and in particular for contemplative scholarship, within the academy. The loss of time to think is occurring at exactly the moment when scholars, educators, and students have gained access to digital tools of great value to scholarship. This interactive session reviews research on technology’s impacts and demonstrates some contemplative practices that can respond to them. Contemplative pedagogy can offset the distractions of our multi-tasking, multi-media culture, and show how the needs of this generation of students can be met through innovative teaching methods that integrate secular practices of contemplation.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Walking the Labyrinth: Contemplative Instructional Techniques to Enhance Learner Engagement
Carol Henderson and Janice Monroe, Ithaca College

Bringing ancient traditional meditative skills into the contemporary classroom, con-templative learning techniques serve as an effective counterbalance to the speedi-ness and distractions of today’s fast-paced technology-based cultural environment.  Applicable to both faculty development programs and to faculty working directlywith students, contemplative methods create a richer, more engaging learningenvironment by allowing participants to quiet their minds and focus deeply on the material at hand. This interactive session provides instruction and practice in con-templative techniques, offers examples of their use, and supports the integration of these techniques into any discipline or subject area.

Topics: Faculty Professional Development, Teaching & Learning

Contemplative Computing and Our Future of Education

Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, Stanford University

A generation of educators have spent their professional lives hearing that technol-
ogy is changing the world, transforming the way we think, and that higher educa-
tion must evolve or become obsolete. In case you didn’t get the message in the

1960s and 1970s, with cassette tapes, television and mainframe computers, it was

repeated in the 1980s when personal computers appeared; repeated again in the

1990s, with CD-ROMs (remember those) and the World Wide Web; repeated again

in the early 2000s with blogs and wikis; and recently, repeated once again in the

wake of social media, YouTube and the real-time Web.

This language of technological revolution and institutional reaction is backward. It

gives too much credit and agency to technology, and makes today’s changes seem

unprecedented and inevitable. Neither is actually true. Contemplative computing—

the effort to design technologies and interactions that aren’t perpetually demanding

and distracting, but help users be more mindful and focused—provides a language

for talking differently about the place of technology in teaching, learning, and edu-
cation. We think of today’s technologies as uniquely appealing to our reptilian, dopa-
mine- and stimulation-craving brains. In reality, distraction is an ancient problem,

and the rise of contemplative practices and institutions (most notably monasteries

and universities) is a response to that problem. Abandoning our traditional role as

stewards of contemplative life is as dangerous for the societies we serve as it is

short-sighted and counterproductive. Contemplative computing argues that even

today, people have choices about how to interact with technologies, how to use

them, and how to make the parts of our extended minds; and that part of our job

as educators is to show students how to exercise that agency.

10 +1 Excellent platforms to create your class website

10 Excellent platforms to create your class website

  1. Wix
  2. Google Sites
  3. Weebly for Education
  4. Yola
  5. SchoolRack
  6. Blogger
  7. WordPress
  8. Edublog
  9. KidBlog
  10. Glogster Edu

 

Should Coding be the “New Foreign Language” Requirement?

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/coding-new-foreign-language-requirement-helen-mowers

Coding, Cognition and Communication

In terms of cognitive advantages, learning a system of signs, symbols and rules used to communicate — that is, language study — improves thinking by challenging the brain to recognize, negotiate meaning and master different language patterns. Coding does the same thing. Students who speak English and Mandarin are better multitaskers because they’re used to switching between language structures. Coding, likewise, involves understanding and working within structures.

Foreign language instruction today emphasizes practical communication — what students can do with the language. Similarly, coding is practical, empowering and critical to the daily life of everyone living in the 21st century.

Coding is Ubiquitous

Programming is the global language, more common than spoken languages like English, Chinese or Spanish.

5 Reasons Why You Should Teach Kids to Code ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/10/5-reasons-why-you-should-teach-kids-to.html

http://blog.stcloudstate.edu/ims/2013/11/19/finland-eyes-programming-classes-for-elementary-school-students/

Why We’re Learning about Coding in Our 6th Grade Writing Class

http://www.middleweb.com/11559/learning-coding-in-writing-class/

Should coding replace foreign language requirements?

http://www.educationdive.com/news/should-coding-replace-foreign-language-requirements/361398/

Washington state and Kentucky have both proposed legislation that mirrors this trend, with Washington asking that students be allowed to count two years of computer science courses as two years of foreign language studies.
In an October post, Washington Post columnist Valerie Strauss wrote that coding is something like “cursive 2.0” — a practice that will soon become compulsory in schools across the nation.

Collaborative cloud-based tools to consider, Real-Time Collaboration Tools

5 Free Cloud-Based Document Collaboration Tools to Power Your Productivity

http://ow.ly/qkji8

  1. Evernote
    Learn More about Evernote with These Excellent Video Tutorials ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning 
  2. Google Docs
    Kaizena: add audio comments to the  content of your Google documents http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/10/a-great-tool-to-add-audio-feedback-to.html 
  3. MindMeister (paid, might want to skip it)
  4. Trello
  5. WordPress

http://www.21things4teachers.net/3—collaboration-tools.html#!

Lino

Doodle  – Meeting Wizard

Google Drive, formerly known as Google Docs

The 10 best powerPoint Alternatives!
http://www.powtoon.com/blog/10-best-powerpoint-alternatives/

33 Highly Useful Presentation Tools
http://smallbiztrends.com/2009/09/33-useful-presentation-tools.html#!

Prezi http://philpresents.wordpress.com/2011/08/30/two-reasons-i-dont-recommend-prezi/

http://popplet.com/
http://stampsy.com
https://www.slideshark.com

20 Options for Real-Time Collaboration Tools

http://edtechreview.in/news/news/products-apps-tools/825-20-options-for-real-time-collaboration-tools

Neat Chat: It is one of the easiest and fastest ways to have online conversations with a group of friends or colleagues. It provides a clean, fast and robust chat room where you can share files, send private messages and even access conversations that happened in your absence.

Today’s Meet: Allows you to have quick conversations in private online chat rooms. It has a back channel which gives you the ability to adjust your audience’s needs and emotions. In your chat room you can use live stream to make comments, ask questions and use that feedback to tailor your presentations to address your audience’s needs

Zoho Writer: Is a powerful rich text-editor for Android devices, which allows you to create documents seamlessly with a rich feature-set. You can either save these docs in local devices or cloud devices like Zoho Docs. Zoho Docs workspace is a collaboration tool, which allows you to share work on the same doc with other people in real-time.

Scriblink: Is a free digital whiteboard that users can share online in real-time. It can be used by up to 5 users at the same time. It can be used just for fun or for more practical things like layout planning, concept diagramming, or tutoring a friend.

Stinto: Is for creating free chats and inviting others to join just by sending a simple link. It allows you to share photos and images with others. You can upload photos, sketches, diagrams, etc. to your chat for others to view.

Mind42: Allows collaborative online mind-mapping and brainstorming. It runs in your browser and allows you to manage your ideas alone or while working in a group. It allows you to quickly create, manage and edit the data structure required for mind maps.

Scribblar: Offers you an online whiteboard, real-time audio, document upload, text-chat and more. It is a perfect online-tutoring platform. You can use it to revise artwork and images; create brainstorming, product demos, interviews and tests.

CoSketch: Is a multi-user online whiteboard designed to give you the ability to quickly visualize and share your ideas as images. Anything you paint is shared in real-time and can be saved and embedded on forums, blogs, etc.

Twiddla: Is a real-time online collaboration tool, which allows text and audio chat in real-time. It also allows you to review websites within the application.

Etherpad: Is an open source online editor providing collaborative editing in real-time. You can write articles, press releases, to-do lists and more along with your friends or colleagues all working on the same doc at the same time.

Tinychat: It lets you create a private chat room in an instant, the URL of which can be emailed to others to participate in real-time. It is very easy to use and also has features to support video capability.

FlashMeeting: Is an easy-to-use online meeting application. A meeting is pre-booked by a registered user and a URL, containing a unique password for the meeting, is returned by the FlashMeeting server, which is passed on to the people who want to participate.

BigMarker: It combines messaging, file sharing and video calls into one place. BigMarker communities have features for conferencing for up to 100 people, presenting PowerPoints and other docs, sharing your screen, recording, storing, exporting sessions and more.

Meetin.gs: Is a web and mobile meeting organizer which brings the benefits of online collaboration to both online and offline meetings. It provides a dedicated online meeting space for scheduling, material sharing and agenda setting.

Conceptboard: It provides instant whiteboards to create a platform for you to communicate with your team. Feedback on visual content is easy and there is support for tasks, reports and more. It simplifies and improves collaboration on visual content and accelerates collaboration processes within your team.

Speek: Allows you to simply organize conference calls. Speek uses a personal or business link instead of a phone number and PIN for conference calls. Participants can join or start a call from their phone, web or mobile browser. You can see who’s joined, who’s talking, share files, use call controls and more.

Draw It Live: Is a free application that allows you to work together with other people to draw in real-time. You can create a whiteboard and share its URL with other people to let them join.

LiveMinutes: Is an online conferencing app. A unique URL address is created for your conference that you can share with people you want to connect with. You can share audio, virtual whiteboards, documents, etc. and a feature to share videos is coming soon.

FlockDraw: Is an online whiteboard based painting and drawing tool. It makes it easy to draw online free with multiple people participation. There can be unlimited people in a room with drawing updates in real-time.

VIDquik: Is a video-conferencing platform where you can connect and talk with anyone you want. You just need to enter the Email of the person you want to call, they click on the link and the two of you are in a web-based video call.

bibliography list of peer-reviewed literature on “flipped classroom”

list of peer reviewed literature on “flipped classroom”

Findlay-Thompson, S., & Mombourquette, P. (2013). EVALUATION OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN AN UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS COURSE. Global Conference On Business & Finance Proceedings, 8(2), 138-145.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=buh&AN=89496806

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=keh&AN=88785048

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology Research & Development, 61(4), 563-580. doi:10.1007/s11423-013-9305-6
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=keh&AN=88785048

Missildine, K., Fountain, R., Summers, L., & Gosselin, K. (2013). Flipping the Classroom to Improve Student Performance and Satisfaction. Journal Of Nursing Education, 52(10), 597-599. doi:10.3928/01484834-20130919-03
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=rzh&AN=2012318677

Butt, A. (2014). STUDENT VIEWS ON THE USE OF A FLIPPED CLASSROOM APPROACH: EVIDENCE FROM AUSTRALIA. Business Education & Accreditation, 6(1), 33-43.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=buh&AN=90567007

Strayer, J. F. (2012). How Learning in an Inverted Classroom Influences Cooperation, Innovation and Task Orientation. Learning Environments Research, 15(2), 171-193.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=eric&AN=EJ977852

Critz, C. M., & Knight, D. (2013). Using the Flipped Classroom in Graduate Nursing Education. Nurse Educator, 38(5), 210-213. doi:10.1097/NNE.0b013e3182a0e56a
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=rzh&AN=2012296027

Herreid, C., & Schiller, N. A. (2013). Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom. Journal Of College Science Teaching, 42(5), 62-66.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=keh&AN=86988365

Jottings by Saquarrah. (2013). Medical Teacher, 35(6), 532-533.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=aph&AN=89131643

search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=tfh&AN=85672747

Brunsell, E., & Horejsi, M. (2013). Science 2.0. Science Teacher, 80(2), 8.
http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip&db=sch&AN=85127911

 

“whiteboard screencasting” and “lecture capture” apps: please enter your choices and suggestions

Greg Jorgensen emailed us with his new darling:

Explain Everything – https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.morriscooke.explaineverything

and raises a very good question:

What do we know and how do we organize our tools and apps for whiteboard screencasting and lecture capture?

Screencasting
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-learning#Screencasting

Screencast
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screencast

Greg’s choice of the day is atop of a list from the Ed Tech/y and Mobile Learning web site:
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/6-useful-ipad-apps-for-creating.html

next on that top-6-list are

Teach

Show Me

Educreations Interactive Whiteboard

Doodlecast Pro

Pixntell

Doceri (http://doceri.com/) is a very promissing app, which Bob Lessinger was pushing to be installed on campuos computers (being free), but it is ONLY iPAD-bound (not even iPHone or iTouch)
In addition to Doceri: Stage : Interactive Whiteboard and Document Camera and Splashtop Whiteboard per: 3 Apps to Turn Your iPad into Interactive Whiteboard ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Here is a neat table about the compatibility (iOS and Android) for several of these apps:
http://www.elcamino.edu/administration/staffdev/training/whiteboardscreencasting.pdf

Here is another good resource from Alaska. The screencasting apps reviewed are the same as above, but other good sources regarding a pedagogy involving the technology.

A broader approach to this issue (Presentation & Screencasting Apps) on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/itechservices/presentation-screencasting-apps/

More apps and possibilities, as well as “how-to” directions here:
http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com/2011/06/07/how-i-make-screencasts-the-whiteboard-screencast/

Here is an useful blog entry, comparing  ExlpainEverything with Educreation —
http://freebiologyschool.blogspot.com/2013/04/explaineverything-app-better-than.html

More apps:

Lecturnity ( http://www.lecturnity.com )

Tegrity http://tegr.it/

FlySketch http://flyingmeat.com/flysketch/

http://presentationtube.com/
a lengthy review is available here: http://smorgastech.blogspot.com/?goback=%2Egde_2038260_member_5807615489219772416#%21

Digital Identity and Digital Citizenship

5 Excellent Videos to Teach Your Students about Digital Citizenship ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

bibliography:

Ramspott’s blog entry best written for my personal taste, but here is a long list of additional and similar opinions:

Bramman, R. (n.d.). Digital Identity Essentials: Understanding Online Etiquette and the Rules Social Media Engagement. Research Personal Branding. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/

Braunstein, D. (2013, March 20). Digital Identities: Who Are You When You’re Online? Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/danya-braunstein/digital-identities-who-ar_b_2904211.html
Dalton, J. C., & Crosby, P. C. (2013). Digital Identity: How Social Media Are Influencing Student Learning and Development in College. Journal of College and Character, 14(1), 1–4. doi:10.1515/jcc-2013-0001
Death and the Social Network: The Persistence of Digital Identity. (n.d.). Jed Brubaker. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.jedbrubaker.com/death-and-the-social-network-the-persistence-of-digital-identity/
Digital identity. (2013, October 3). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_identity&oldid=575355398
Digital Identity – Social Media and You. (n.d.). Altan Khendup. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://altankhendup.com/altankhendupblog/2013/6/6/digital-identity-social-media-and-you
Digital Identity and Social Media CFC. (n.d.). Liquid Learning. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://warburton.typepad.com/liquidlearning/2009/09/digital-identity-and-social-media-cfc.html
Digital Identity, Social Media, Privacy, Balance, and Being Radical. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://eduniverse.org/digital-identity-social-media-privacy-balance-and-being-radical
fsubeccaramspott. (n.d.). 2013: The Year of Digital Identity Development in Higher Education. CASE Blog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://blog.case.org/2013/01/15/2013-the-year-of-digital-identity-development-in-higher-education/
Higher Ed Live – Digital Identity Development. (n.d.). Higher Ed Live. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://higheredlive.com/higher-ed-live-digital-identity-development/
Manage Your Digital Identity | Inside Higher Ed. (n.d.). Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/gradhacker/manage-your-digital-identity
News: Social Media Thought Leader Eric Stoller to Speak About Digital Identity and Higher Education at Kent State, Feb. 14. (n.d.). Kent State University. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.kent.edu/news/newsdetail.cfm?newsitem=CAB2045F-0159-B0DC-526E15EFB8C5A416
Stewart, B. (n.d.). Digital Identities: Six Key Selves of Networked Publics. The Theoryblog. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from http://www.reachpersonalbranding.com/digital-identity-essentials-understanding-online-etiquette-and-the-rules-social-media-engagement/
Stroller, E. (n.d.). Digital Identity and Social Media // Speaker Deck. Retrieved October 3, 2013, from https://speakerdeck.com/ericstoller/digital-identity-and-social-media
Warburton, S., & Hatzipanagos, S. (Eds.). (2012). Digital Identity and Social Media: IGI Global. Retrieved from http://www.igi-global.com/book/digital-identity-social-media/63892

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Teach Digital Citizenship with … Minecraft

http://askatechteacher.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/teach-digital-citizenship-with-minecraft/

In the summer, there was an article about physics professor using Minecraft, but that’s not new because an MIT physics professor was using rap in the down of podcasting to teach physics and then another one later on was using Second Life. All of them gone by now…

From: Ewing, M Keith
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 4:43 PM
Subject: Eric Stoller on Digital Identity

A couple of interesting links to comments by Eric Stoller on “digital identity” – which he defines as “made up of their online interactions and exchanges.”

Character Clearinghouse – Interview with Eric Stoller, 2013 Jon C. Dalton Institute on College Student Values, Keynote Speaker

https://characterclearinghouse.fsu.edu/index.php/jon-c-dalton-institute-on-college-student-values/keynote-speakers/925-stoller

Digital Identity Keynote at Curry College (full video is about 63 minutes; includes transcript of the Twitter stream about his talk)

http://ericstoller.com/blog/2013/06/21/digital-identity-keynote-at-curry-college/

Eric might make a good speaker to students (and faculty) …

my (Plamen) note: Keith’s email and his suggestions for readings, e.g.

http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jcc.2013.14.issue-1/jcc-2013-0001/jcc-2013-0001.xml

connects with “contemplative computing” and Turkle’s disconnect, so I am entering as tags

Free Slideshow Presentation and Creation Tools for Teachers

The 5 Best Free Slideshow Presentation and Creation Tools for Teachers

http://elearningindustry.com/the-5-best-free-slideshow-presentation-and-creation-tools-for-teachers

A List of 20 Free Tools for Teachers to Create Awesome Presentations and Slideshows ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2012/05/list-of-20-free-tools-for-teachers-to.html
1-  SlideShare

It Offers  users the ability to upload and share publicly or privately PowerPoint presentations, Word documents and Adobe PDF Portfolios.

2-  Animoto  ( no option for collaboration)
Animoto turns your photos and video clips into professional video slideshows in minutes.

 3- VUVOX ( side is down)

VUVOX allows you to create interactive slideshows and presentations from photos, video and music from Flickr, Picasa Web Albums, YouTube, Facebook and more.

 4- Knovio

Knovio gives life to static slides and with a simple click you will be able to turn them into rich video and audio presentations that you can share with your friends and colleagues via email or popular social media websites. Knovio does not require any software installation or download, it is all web based.

 5- Ahead

 

Ahead is a great presentation tool for educators. It  works in such a way that it instantly transforms your layouts into a zooming presentation. Check it out its is great.

6- HelloSlide

 

HelloSlide is a cool web tool that allows its users to create awesome slides together with voice narration.

7- Jux
Jux is one of the best showcase for your stories. You can embed videos and photos from your hard drive or from a URL.
8-  Slidestaxx
Slidestaxx is a great presentation tool. It allows its users to create amazing social media slideshows. You can now gather media from different sources and put them together in an engaging slideshow using Slidestaxx to embed it in your blog, website or wiki.
9- Present.me
It allows its users to record and share their presentations using their webcams.

 10- PhotoPeach

 

PhotoPeach is a free  online service that allows it users to create media rich slideshows.What i like the most about this tool is the fact that it supports background music .Integrating audio into photo slideshows makes them quite engaging and presentable

11- Slideboom

12-  Zentation

13- Empressr

14- VoiceThread

15- Slidesix

16- Zoho Show

17- Prezentit

18- Popplet

19- AuthorStream
20- SlideRocket

21- Prezi

“Best Presentations of the Decade”

http://portal.sliderocket.com/sliderocket/Best-Presentations-of-the-Decade

 

8 Best PowerPoint Presentations: How to Create Engaging Presentations

https://www.udemy.com/blog/best-powerpoint-presentations/

 

Make PowerPoint Presentations Using Movie Maker

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieDTmRgb3-Y

 

Creating Presentations in Windows Movie Maker

http://www.kidsnetsoft.com/global/moviemaker.pdf

 

How to Make a PowerPoint video presentation in Windows Movie Maker

http://movie-maker.wonderhowto.com/how-to/make-powerpoint-video-presentation-windows-movie-maker-322520/

 

Using Windows Movie Maker to Edit or Compile Media for Use with Presentations and Classroom Activities

http://matnonline.pbworks.com/f/Movie+Maker+presentation+pdf.pdf

 

Create Interactive Infographics

http://infogr.am/

 

visual.ly

http://visual.ly/

 

Piktochart

http://piktochart.com/

1001Freefonts.com

http://pf.kizoa.com/
Kizoa is neat but expensive. It does most of what iMovie does, including direct posting to social media. However, one needs to pay in order to do that.

The MOOC Is Dead! Long Live Open Learning!

http://diyubook.com/2013/07/the-mooc-is-dead-long-live-open-learning/

We’re at a curious point in the hype cycle of educational innovation, where the hottest concept of the past year–Massive Open Online Courses, or MOOCs–is simultaneously being discovered by the mainstream media, even as the education-focused press is declaring them dead. “More Proof MOOCs are Hot,” and “MOOCs Embraced By Top Universities,” said the Wall Street Journal and USA Today last week upon the announcement that Coursera had received a $43 million round of funding to expand its offerings;
“Beyond MOOC Hype” was the nearly simultaneous headline in Inside Higher Ed.

Can MOOCs really be growing and dying at the same time?

The best way to resolve these contradictory signals is probably to accept that the MOOC, itself still an evolving innovation, is little more than a rhetorical catchall for a set of anxieties around teaching, learning, funding and connecting higher education to the digital world. This is a moment of cultural transition. Access to higher education is strained. The prices just keep rising. Questions about relevance are growing. The idea of millions of students from around the world learning from the worlds’ most famous professors at very small marginal cost, using the latest in artificial intelligence and high-bandwidth communications, is a captivating one that has drawn tens of millions in venture capital. Yet, partnerships between MOOC platforms and public institutions like SUNY and the University of California to create self-paced blended courses and multiple paths to degrees look like a sensible next step for the MOOC, but they are far from that revolutionary future. Separate ideas like blended learning and plain old online delivery seem to be blurring with and overtaking the MOOC–even Blackboard is using the term.

The time seems to be ripe for a reconsideration of the “Massive” impact of “Online” and “Open” learning. TheReclaim Open Learning initiative is a growing community of teachers, researchers and learners in higher education dedicated to this reconsideration. Supporters include the MIT Media Lab and the MacArthur Foundation-supported Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. I am honored to be associated with the project as a documentarian and beater of the drum.

Entries are currently open for our Innovation Contest, offering a $2000 incentive to either teachers or students who have projects to transform higher education in a direction that is connected and creative, is open as in open content and open as in open access, that is participatory, that takes advantage of some of the forms and practices that the MOOC also does but is not beholden to the narrow mainstream MOOC format (referring instead to some of the earlier iterations of student-created, distributed MOOCscreated by Dave Cormier, George Siemens, Stephen Downes and others.)

Current entries include a platform to facilitate peer to peer language learning, a Skype-based open-access seminar with guests from around the world, and a student-created course in educational technology. Go hereto add your entry! Deadline is August 2. Our judges include Cathy Davidson (HASTAC), Joi Ito (MIT), and Paul Kim (Stanford).

Reclaim Open Learning earlier sponsored a hackathon at the MIT Media Lab. This fall, September 27 and 28, our judges and contest winners will join us at a series of conversations and demo days to Reclaim Open Learning at the University of California, Irvine. If you’re interested in continuing the conversation, join us there or check us out online.

July 18, 2013

On Millennials

Millennials comprise the largest generational sector since the baby boomers. As this group enters the job market, training organizations will be forced to find new innovative ways to reach this new audience.

http://www.allencomm.com/3-strategies-to-engage-millennials-get-results/

Schaffhauser, D. (2015). American Millennials Not Terribly Bright When It Comes to Pretty Much Everything That Matters, Analysis Finds. Campus Technology. Retrieved from http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/03/04/american-millennials-not-terribly-bright.aspx
America’s Skills Challenge: Millennials and the Future” actually examines data from a couple of years ago that came out of the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) to compare the United States to 21 other member countries in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

American PISA Scores Drop

12/03/13

http://thejournal.com/articles/2013/12/03/american-pisa-scores-drop.aspx
The numbers are in from the latest Programme for International Student Assessment(PISA), and for American students, as United States Department of EducationSecretary Arne Duncan put it, “It is a picture of educational stagnation.”
The problem is not that our 15-year-olds are performing worse today than before. The problem is that they’re simply not making progress. Students in many other nations are advancing instead of standing still. In a knowledge-based global economy where education is more important than ever before, both to individual success and collective prosperity, our students are basically losing ground. We’re running in place as other high performing countries start to lap us.”
Daniel Domenech, executive director of AASA, theSchool Superintendents Association. “The problem we find in American education isn’t that schools are ‘falling behind,’ it is that schools are ‘pulling apart.’ Poverty in America is the real issue behind today’s education gap.
Among the findings: Top-performing countries, primarily those in Asia, place great emphasis on selecting and training teachers, encourage them to work together and prioritize investment in teacher quality. They also set clear targets and give teachers autonomy in the classroom to achieve them.

American Millennials Not Terribly Bright When It Comes to Pretty Much Everything That Matters, Analysis Finds

http://campustechnology.com/articles/2015/03/04/american-millennials-not-terribly-bright.aspx

American Millennials Not Terribly Bright
American Millennials Not Terribly Bright

“This report suggests that far too many are graduating high school and completing postsecondary educational programs without receiving adequate skills,” the report stated. “If we expect to have a better educated population and a more competitive workforce, policy makers and other stakeholders will need to shift the conversation from one of educational attainment to one that acknowledges the growing importance of skills and examines these more critically.”

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